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Modern note taking software

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  • MikeWI
    replied
    There's another one called Notion, that I want to like, but isn't quite ready for prime-time as far as what I need, but it's worth a look.

    Leave a comment:


  • RancherBill
    replied
    I use Google KEEP, it works well.

    Here's a comparison with MS OneNote which also has been mentioned in the thread.

    Google Keep and OneNote are two popular note-taking services. How do both differ? To find out, the blog post covers Google Keep vs. OneNote.

    Leave a comment:


  • RB211
    replied
    Screw it, just about every Windows programming tutorial series, either C# or C++ has you basically creating a note taking program. Think that's what I'll do, with C#. Stab the vultures in the back and create your own program, that's the only way to truly own your data. Well, besides paper and a pen.
    Last edited by RB211; 04-23-2022, 05:40 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tom S
    replied
    I've tried both Evernote and OneNote, both worked fine but I always end up gravitating back to pad and pencil. I've got a couple moleskine notebooks on the go for various things at work and also like the Field Notes books for a pocket sized memo book.

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul Alciatore
    replied
    God bless .txt files.

    I will bet that Microsoft can SELL you a translator.



    Originally posted by RB211 View Post
    I used OneNote a long time ago and saved all of my notes in the cloud. Fast forward today, after a many year hiatus from using it, the new OneNote will not open or read my old OneNote notes. Grrr

    Leave a comment:


  • Dan Dubeau
    replied
    Evernote was the first one I'd heard of when watching an Adam Savage video a few weeks ago. I live in a cave with most tech stuff and didn't really know something like this existed. It's more expensive than free, but apparently a bit better judging by a few ratings I've read. At this stage of my life ANY software is better than none, so we'll see how I do with one note for now. I brought some new jobs home from work to design this weekend on a memory stick, so already off to a good start lol. Old habits are hard to break.....

    If I knew anything about linux, and had any techie bone in my body I'd look into the info qwerty posted last page. I don't though. This stuff makes my head spin.

    Leave a comment:


  • MikeWI
    replied
    I use Evernote. It's by far the best of the ones that I've tried, and I've tried a lot of them. But then again I hate Onenote, so there you go. Different strokes etc. etc.

    Leave a comment:


  • Doozer
    replied
    Originally posted by Black Forest View Post
    I use an analog solution. Her name is Jane. If I didn't have her I wouldn't know where anything would be anywhere. Her filing system is great and I can find anything I need when she is not at work. She pretty much puts what I need where it needs to be before I need it. I hope she doesn't read this as she will be after me for a raise. And no Jane is not my wife and she doesn't take DICKtation. Strictly business. If I didn't have Jane I wouldn't be able to play on my farm and do all the piddly things I like to do. The best thing about having Jane is she screens my calls.
    That sounds really great.
    Here in America (I know you are from Texas)
    companies do not any longer have secretaries.
    Oh wait, too diminutive. Call them administrative assistants.
    Oh wait, the clerical work itself is too diminutive to segregate it
    to one person. Let's make the high paid engineers and managers
    do the diminutive book keeping, and interrupt their higher level
    thinking, and burden them with clerical work, because as mentioned
    before, it is degrading to have someone dedicated to attend to these
    kinds of tasks exclusively. We don't want to get sued for dumping
    tasks on people that someone else originated. Handing things off
    is discrimination and diminutive. It must be. Have the PhDs log in
    their receipts for buying lab chemicals. Have the engineers rectify
    their credit card statements for buying prototype parts. Heaven
    forbid they should concentrate on thinking or designs.
    Don't even get me going on the fact that NO company has someone
    to help you at the front door and no one to direct your phone call.
    No time or money for that. Visitors have to directly make appointments
    with managers or engineers, and then be met at the front gate, let in
    the door, force them to get their temperature scan, sign a waiver of
    liability, on and on and on. The system is structured to hassle you to
    death until you give up and refuse to take it any more.
    And they don't even see the entrapment of the web they weave.
    Jump on the train. Everyone does it, so that must make it Ok.


    --Doozer

    Leave a comment:


  • Black Forest
    replied
    I use an analog solution. Her name is Jane. If I didn't have her I wouldn't know where anything would be anywhere. Her filing system is great and I can find anything I need when she is not at work. She pretty much puts what I need where it needs to be before I need it. I hope she doesn't read this as she will be after me for a raise. And no Jane is not my wife and she doesn't take DICKtation. Strictly business. If I didn't have Jane I wouldn't be able to play on my farm and do all the piddly things I like to do. The best thing about having Jane is she screens my calls.

    Leave a comment:


  • RB211
    replied
    I used OneNote a long time ago and saved all of my notes in the cloud. Fast forward today, after a many year hiatus from using it, the new OneNote will not open or read my old OneNote notes. Grrr

    Leave a comment:


  • gellfex
    replied
    I use Google Keep, it sounds like the functionality is similar to OneNote. In addition to the to-do lists that take up most of my notes, it can draw, take a pic etc. The synching between the phone and desktop is insanely useful, I'll often use it to transfer some text from back and forth. Plus you never have to hit 'save', it's all saved. And my android phone takes great dictation, I dictate most of my texts.

    Leave a comment:


  • qwerty12345
    replied
    Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
    Inspired by this discussion and with a desk where I can not see more than a square inch of it's top, I just tried to open Onenote to see what it could do for me.

    The first thing it wanted was for me to sign in using my choice of accounts. That sets off the alarm bells in my bell tower. LOUD ONES! Why is this program free? Who or what pays for it?

    The cloud services that others above have touched on, like instantly on my other computers and devices, is a clue. I fear the answer is that Microsoft is gathering user's thoughts and selling them to advertisers for "targeted"* advertising. I don't know about you, but my e-mail IN basket is perpetually running out of storage space. Not to mention the "targeted" ads I get in the snail mail and on web sites I visit. I am certainly not going to expose myself to any of that.

    And if you encrypt your data before uploading it to the cloud, you must ask yourself WHO wrote the encryption software. Programmers are notorious for creating back doors. What they encrypt only you and the author of the encryption scheme can read. And anybody else that author has shared it with. And please don't tell me these things don't happen.

    And that is only one possible use for the data that they gather with these cloud services. The others are probably more nefarious. Frankly, if I were running a company I would absolutely forbid anyone from using any cloud service without my explicit permission on a case by case basis.

    * I put the word targeted in quotes above because their efforts at doing that are so pathetic. You mention something once or a few times and people like Google immediately put you on a list as a buyer of that thing. Worse yet, you make a one-in-ten-year purchase and then get bombarded with ads for that product. What that purchase really indicated was that the buyer is supplied with that product for many years to come and it is a total waste of resources to target him/her for another such purchase. Advertising people are STUUUUUPIIIIIIDDDDDDDDD! Actually super stupid.

    Paul, your concerns are right on the mark. In order to get out of the web of perverse incentives that cause these problems, you should do two basic things:

    1) Use open-source, ideally "Free" and open-source (FOSS) software. The "free" here is free as in Freedom, not free as in beer ("gratis", though it is usually free-as-in-beer too!). Sometimes called FLOSS (free/libre open-source software).

    An ".exe" file is usually a binary file--all 1s and 0s. You and I can't read the code, and many companies distribute only binaries specifically *because* they don't want people to know what it's doing. If you and everyone else have the source code, it can be inspected and you can see exactly what the software is doing. FOSS gives you that. Security by obscurity (what Microsoft, Google, Apple, etc. practice) is a bad plan, and incentivizes those companies to abuse their users. Don't trust them.

    A good start here is trying out a Linux distribution, like Mint or Ubuntu. You don't even need to install it, you can run it from a DVD or flash drive. They are modern and easy to use, and they won't hit you with ads, steal your data, or pester you constantly trying to get you to open your wallet.


    2) Don't use non-free network services like gmail, Facebook, etc. That's how they get you in to their walled gardens (escape is difficult!)

    3) Block all ads. You should almost never see an ad on the internet. Surf using Firefox and install uBlock Origin.


    As far as note-taking software, here are some non-abusive solutions:
    Bookstack
    Vikunja
    Joplin
    Cryptee
    Dokuwiki + Argon
    Tiddlywiki

    Check here for more stuff:
    The most reliable website for privacy tools since 2015. Software, services, apps and privacy guides to fight surveillance with encryption for better internet privacy.

    This is a collection of software, operating systems, and other miscellaneous tools to help the average user fight for their privacy and security online.


    Leave a comment:


  • Dan Dubeau
    replied
    I don't have a suggestion for you Paul. I must be an anomaly. I've had the same Hotmail address for over 20 years, and barely get any spam. It's mostly from sites I've signed up for, and they usually have an unsubscribe link down near the bottom somewhere. If you stay on top of it, it doesn't get out of hand. The rest go to my junkmail folder, and I might get 3-5 a day there. Most times less. It's honestly barely a problem.

    I'd start by opening the emails, and looking for the unsub link. The ones from Nigerian princes, go straight to the trash, don't open those ones... It's all empty promises

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul Alciatore
    replied
    Dan, I see your point. And if it works for you, then go for it.

    Perhaps you have a suggestion for cleaning out my IN box?

    Leave a comment:


  • R.Bolte.Jr
    replied
    Originally posted by lugnut View Post
    I think one of the best things I like about OneNote is when make an entry on one of your computers/devices, It is automatically updated on all your devices you have the program on.
    Thats the best part of "Notes" on Apple products...
    Start a shopping list on my laptop, stop for coffee and update it on the iPad, bust out the iPhone at the depot and check off stuff as I go.

    Leave a comment:

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