Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

I get a free mill!

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    Originally posted by The Metal Butcher View Post
    That looks like a winner to me. I think I have a right side bracket, but I'd just buy a power feed. For the Y, there should be an extension screwed into the screw, probably with locktite.
    I have a bracket and some parts from my Lagun if they fit. I will check once I am able to get into this one. Thank you for the offer! I'll keep it in mind.
    Andy

    Comment


    • #32
      Originally posted by CPeter View Post
      It had power feeders and they took them off. if everything else is ok, then then the money would be worth spending on.
      Peter
      From what I see so far I will definitely spend a couple dollars on it to get it back into shape. I don't even have a y axis power feed on my lagun yet. For now I think I will just try to get the missing dial and parts to get it back to functioning.
      Andy

      Comment


      • #33
        Originally posted by junkaddict View Post
        I thought the Frejoth I picked up was a deal at $400, but free, damn, definitely a you suck. About the same amount of grime, but cleaned up real nice. Love that mill. It has exceeded my expectations.
        I couldn't believe it myself when he said "just bring a trailer"! Free tools are always the best tools!
        Andy

        Comment


        • #34
          Originally posted by Doc Nickel View Post
          The big trick on the rust is a single-edge razor blade. Buy a pack of 'em, and maybe a holder if you want (I recommend it) and simply "shave" the rust off like you're scraping a sticker off a window.

          Do NOT "flip over" the blade, and when it gets dull, toss it and get a new one. They're cheap. I've done it dry, which I prefer but it makes a lot of dust, or I've misted it with WD-40 first, which makes a messy slurry, but it cleans up easily. Your grease will be about halfway in between.

          Once the bulk of the rust is off, use small sections of Scotchbrite and a liberal amount of WD-40, to scrub the remainder back to fairly bright.

          I know "they" say not to use abrasives on machined ways, but first, the rust has already damaged the ways, and second, you'll need a steam-powered and pressure-oiled elbow to remove even a full .001" off any given machined surface.

          Scrape, Scotchbrite, wipe up the schmutz. A little patience and you can have it all back to shiny in no time.

          Doc.
          Thanks for the tip, I will give it a try. From what I see when just brushing on the grease is most of it won't take much work at all to remove. Must have been very well oiled all the time. I am excited to see what the ways look like!
          Andy

          Comment


          • #35
            Originally posted by Doc Nickel View Post
            The big trick on the rust is a single-edge razor blade. Buy a pack of 'em, and maybe a holder if you want (I recommend it) and simply "shave" the rust off like you're scraping a sticker off a window.



            Doc.
            Doc what brand of Razors do you use,I’ve tried some cheap brands and refuse to buy them anymore,Richard brand are head and shoulders better than anything else I’ve used.

            Comment


            • #36
              FWIW I have not tried a razor but navel jelly works well for surface rust like that.
              Nice score!
              Cheers,
              jon

              Comment


              • #37
                Some people get lucky. A guy I know got a free surface grinder, this one. People even pitched in on the forums (a swedish one) to have it sent to him.

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by Tundra Twin Track View Post
                  Doc what brand of Razors do you use[?]
                  -Whatever Home Depot carries, though there's a couple other local suppliers I might grab a 100-pack from when I'm running low. Never really noticed a difference in quality or longevity- although admittedly, I keep the single-edges around kind of specifically for the ugly stuff. Rust removal, gasket scraping, slicing heavy cardboard, etc.

                  Doc.

                  Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    This method works great for cleaning rust off of machine tools. Have used it often.

                    Originally posted by Doc Nickel View Post
                    The big trick on the rust is a single-edge razor blade. Buy a pack of 'em, and maybe a holder if you want (I recommend it) and simply "shave" the rust off like you're scraping a sticker off a window.

                    Do NOT "flip over" the blade, and when it gets dull, toss it and get a new one. They're cheap. I've done it dry, which I prefer but it makes a lot of dust, or I've misted it with WD-40 first, which makes a messy slurry, but it cleans up easily. Your grease will be about halfway in between.

                    Once the bulk of the rust is off, use small sections of Scotchbrite and a liberal amount of WD-40, to scrub the remainder back to fairly bright.

                    I know "they" say not to use abrasives on machined ways, but first, the rust has already damaged the ways, and second, you'll need a steam-powered and pressure-oiled elbow to remove even a full .001" off any given machined surface.

                    Scrape, Scotchbrite, wipe up the schmutz. A little patience and you can have it all back to shiny in no time.

                    Doc.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Doing some quick searching around it seems very hard to find parts for this exact mill. Like many others this is obviously a Bridgeport clone. One of the things I noticed is the base piece for the belt housing is cracked. How likely is it that a base from a bridgeport would work on this mill?
                      Andy

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        I use blades like this one, commonly known as Stanley Knife blades in the UK. Holders can be found to use them as scrapers, but you can hold them in lots of ways. The rust can be scraped off cast irin without damaging the surface like abrasives would. I also use wire wool and oil which is very gentle on ground and machined surfaces. Click image for larger version

Name:	_IGP2940.jpg
Views:	323
Size:	401.1 KB
ID:	2000300

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Originally posted by vpt View Post
                          Doing some quick searching around it seems very hard to find parts for this exact mill. Like many others this is obviously a Bridgeport clone. One of the things I noticed is the base piece for the belt housing is cracked. How likely is it that a base from a bridgeport would work on this mill?
                          I recall seeing a magazine ad offering parts for off shore built clone machines like you have. I think the company was in California. The theory is most clones were probably made in the same factories so parts are interchangeable. The magazine might have been "CNC WEST" since that's the only trade mag I get any more. Give them a call.

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Originally posted by Doc Nickel View Post
                            The big trick on the rust is a single-edge razor blade. Buy a pack of 'em, and maybe a holder if you want (I recommend it) and simply "shave" the rust off like you're scraping a sticker off a window.

                            Do NOT "flip over" the blade, and when it gets dull, toss it and get a new one. They're cheap. I've done it dry, which I prefer but it makes a lot of dust, or I've misted it with WD-40 first, which makes a messy slurry, but it cleans up easily. Your grease will be about halfway in between.

                            Once the bulk of the rust is off, use small sections of Scotchbrite and a liberal amount of WD-40, to scrub the remainder back to fairly bright.

                            I know "they" say not to use abrasives on machined ways, but first, the rust has already damaged the ways, and second, you'll need a steam-powered and pressure-oiled elbow to remove even a full .001" off any given machined surface.

                            Scrape, Scotchbrite, wipe up the schmutz. A little patience and you can have it all back to shiny in no time.

                            Doc.
                            An old printers tip, stone just the very corner of the blade so it doesn’t dig in.
                            By the way, you suck dude!
                            Awesome score!!


                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Good photos and everything. I say that rates a loud,"YOU SUCK!", capital letters and all.

                              Have fun!

                              PS: The RV in the background reminds me of my years in Iowa.



                              Originally posted by vpt View Post
                              The free mill is home! I found a couple small broken bits, I feel from possibly being banged around with fork lifts and whatnot. I brushed on a layer of heavy grease for now as it will still have to sit outside for a bit while I make room in the shop for it. As I was brushing on the grease clean metal was being revealed in many spots! Gives me good hopes most if not all the rust that is there will come off with just a light scrubbing of a steel wool or scuff pad and some wd. Must have had power feeds pulled off of it. Also had a dro as the scales are still there as well as the cables. Has one shot lube system. Motor and spindle turns freely. Axis screws turn freely but I did not run anything far until I can clean the ways. I am excited for this one! Can't wait to dive into it!

                              Click image for larger version  Name:	KIMG4892.jpg Views:	173 Size:	2.40 MB ID:	2000181 Click image for larger version  Name:	KIMG4894.jpg Views:	174 Size:	2.68 MB ID:	2000182 Click image for larger version  Name:	KIMG4897.jpg Views:	172 Size:	3.24 MB ID:	2000183 Click image for larger version  Name:	KIMG4898.jpg Views:	171 Size:	2.55 MB ID:	2000184
                              Paul A.
                              SE Texas

                              And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                              You will find that it has discrete steps.

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Scanning eBay for hours I found the part I need in a big lot of parts. I messaged the seller and was able to buy just the part I need out of the lot. I don't have room for the whole mill in my shop quite yet. I think I am going to pull just the head off and bring it in the shop to go threw first.

                                I think I have a spot figured out in the shop for the mill to live but it will take a bunch of rearranging and taking out one small bench.
                                Andy

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X