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It's time to finally retire....

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  • It's time to finally retire....

    ...My calculator.


    The stainless bezel is falling off, the case is splitting apart, and the buttons are worn, but It's lived in my apron pocket for well over a decade now and had a good life. Bon voyage Casio.

    And you guys probably thought I won the lotto or something and was finally hanging it up. I wish. $3 though, I remember when dollar store calculators were actually a dollar lol.

  • #2
    I can't imagine having a shop calculator that can't do trig functions. For a few dollars more you could have trig functions, their inverse and the ability to do arithmetic with fractions directly.

    https://www.amazon.com/Casio-Scienti...s%2C141&sr=8-1
    Regards, Marv

    Home Shop Freeware - Tools for People Who Build Things
    http://www.myvirtualnetwork.com/mklotz

    Location: LA, CA, USA

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    • #3
      My phone does trig functions when I need to. I just need something small for my front pocket for simple calculations on the floor. It leads a rough and dirty life, hence the dollar store version. I have a fancy graphing HP calculator on my desk, but honestly barely ever use it.

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      • #4
        D.D. At first glance, you were showing a TExas Instrument TI-1766II. Mine is mirror of your Casio. No way mine has been carried every day, but bought it in 1980, or so, for about 3 bux. Duct tape holds the cover on and 5 minutes open in bright light brings up readout. Good iron——-

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        • #5
          Back in the early '70's, my wife bought me desktop calculator for my office. Had nixie tube readouts. Had one oddity, divided 22 by 7, started dividing the answer by 1,000 to see how far it would go. Got bored after a few minutes when I was about 30 decimal points off to the right. Still got that little gem, should check it against my computer to see if it's correct.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by mklotz View Post
            I can't imagine having a shop calculator that can't do trig functions. For a few dollars more you could have trig functions, their inverse and the ability to do arithmetic with fractions directly.

            https://www.amazon.com/Casio-Scienti...s%2C141&sr=8-1
            I haven't done much trig since I learned CAD in 1991. I had a fantastic unique Casio that had a horizontal aspect ratio, a 40 digit display, 10 programmable variable keys, and most important, a back key. Even the damn computer and phone calculators don't have a simple back key!
            Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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            • #7
              I was hoping it was you, Dan, that was retiring! But NO!!!

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              • #8
                Before I retired I used my Construction Master 5 every day. Still use it on occasion.

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                • #9
                  Still got the slide rule I inherited from my dad-
                  I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                  • #10
                    I have the exact same one.
                    Never gets lost.
                    Nothing ever falls on it.
                    I don't think it cost me $3 though.
                    Mike

                    My Dad always said, "If you want people to do things for you on the farm, you have to buy a machine they can sit on that does most of the work."

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                    • #11
                      I've only had great experience with the Casio brand. My programmable scientific model has been a faithful companion since around 1990. Thing is still smarter than me.

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                      • #12
                        I have my dads slide rule from his years at the University of Washington and my Sharp EL-5100 from college. Well my sharp is a replacement as the first one was stolen at a job site. The 5100 is much like Gelflex's Casio. It is a horizontal that is programmable with algebraic entry. It also has cursor back and delete that allows for easy formula change on the fly. I have not found anything that is as easy to use today.
                        Robin

                        Happily working on my second million Gave up on the first

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                        • #13
                          I keep a TI solar 30 I've had since 1985. It's a reminder of hard times after a divorce and no job in the same week. Then finding a new job I needed it and had to finance it over several payments.

                          The thing was only 50 bucks.

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                          • #14
                            I have 3 or 4 cheap scientific calculators around my shop stationed at different machines and toolboxes. That way I don't ever have to reach very far to have one in hand. They are so inexpensive it just makes sense. I have a nice scientific on my smart phone that does most anything I can imagine, has the ability to edit entries and all of that, but most of what I need in the shop is the four basic math functions and trig functions.

                            I do have a retired android phone in the shop (typically free if you ask around of your friends and family) that is not activated but works fine on my wifi for looking stuff up and as a tool for use with a borescope camera, an OBD scanner, vibration sensor, and who knows what else. It keeps me from risking messing up my regular cellphone with my clumsy greasy hands, etc.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by rdfeil View Post
                              I have my dads slide rule from his years at the University of Washington . . .
                              I still have my mahogany K&E slide rule from when I started at the University of Washington in 1959. In 2006 I showed it to a young engineer at Orbital Science. He remarked that that he'd heard of slide rules, but had never seen one!

                              Allan Ostling

                              Phoenix, Arizona

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