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  • JB Weld

    Used some JB weld on the non piston end of this.
    In general, I view JB as a mistake fixer. In this case that’s exactly what it was. I turned the piston shaft too small to press into the cross head part!
    I’ve got to say, I was impressed. I left the part .005 large to turn concentric to the shaft. After letting it cure overnight, I put it in the lathe snd turned to size. It held up even with the interrupted cutting, all be it, only .005.
    I think I’ll still cross pin it just in case.

    Sid
    Last edited by sid pileski; 04-24-2022, 07:36 PM.

  • #2
    I think it's pretty good within it's limits. It's not very strong, doesn't stick super well, but can be extremely useful. I've fixed a ton of stuff with it. I especially like how it "slumps" into joints, even more so with a little heat. Makes it easier to get a complete fill and bond.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by sid pileski View Post
      Used some JB weld on the non piston end of this.
      In general, I view JB as a mistake fixer. In this case that’s exactly what it was.

      I think I’ll still cross pin it just in case.

      Sid
      Yeah well, I think that is what a lot of us folks here do. Fix things in one fashion or another. I like your fix, thanks for the post.. I like the idea of doing a pin, Id pin it before too much use otherwise if slipping happens it might ruin the JB, dunno. Thanks. JR

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      • #4
        I thought JB Weld was in the same camp as Duct Tape. Until I used it to fasten a piece of .125 diameter rod on the edge of some .125 thick plate. The plate was a finger for a small press brake I built. It has made a good number of radiused bends in steel sheet metal. I think the overnight cure is important.

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        • #5
          The back of the package used to have user testimonials. Maybe still does. I was especially fond of the comment from a farmer who claimed it's better than bailing wire. High praise indeed.

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          • #6
            Sid--Was there supposed to be a picture with this post? If so, I'm not seeing it. I use J B Weld, but treat it more as a machinists body-fill. It does hide a lot of sin.
            Brian Rupnow
            Design engineer
            Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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            • #7
              Originally posted by brian Rupnow View Post
              Sid--Was there supposed to be a picture with this post? If so, I'm not seeing it. I use J B Weld, but treat it more as a machinists body-fill. It does hide a lot of sin.
              Yes, there is supposed to be a photo.
              Tried to use the photo app here. Hmmmm apparently I didn’t get it to work.

              Hmmmmmm.

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              • #8
                JB is good stuff to have around for repairs etc. I was about out of it and took the easy way out and ordered it on Amazon. When looking around Amazon for it I found much larger tubes, they called it JB weld professional. The standard size was around $5-6 and the large tubes were $13. They pro size tubes are listed as 10oz ( unknown if that's ea tube or total when mixed). They are easily 4X the size of the standard tubes.

                Just something I thought I would pass on.

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                • #9
                  I've used JB Weld to repair a well pressure tank that developed a pinhole in the water side of the the tank and was spraying everywhere. Turned off the pump, bled the pressure down, dried the surface and cleaned with alcohol, mixed a spot of JB and stuck it on. I let it dry until we needed water (a couple of hours, I think) then called my plumber the following Monday (of course, it happened on a Saturday). The patch held fine for the two days it took to get a replacement tank installed. I also used it to plug/re-drill holes in an aluminum casting that where not lined up properly (from the Proxon factory, a long story).

                  Any product that Keith Appleton uses regularly can't be bad!
                  Avid Amateur Home Shop Machinist, Electronics Enthusiast, Chef, Indoorsman. Self-Proclaimed (Dabbler? Dilettante?) Renaissance (old) Man.

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                  • #10
                    While on the subject, some do not know that the 'quick' version is much weaker than the standard cure. If you need or want strength and adhesion, you've gotta wait for it.
                    Southwest Utah

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                    • #11
                      It's just an epoxy with metal powder in it, right?

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                      • #12
                        I've used it a good bit to fix any number of things. The original long cure type is the best IMO, the fast cure one isn't nearly as good. I've fixed a couple plastic radiator tanks with it and had good success. The trick I learned was to clean and rough up the surfaces involved, trowel on a layer of JB. Then embed a piece of screen wire into the wet JB and add another layer on top. That makes it very much stronger and actually able to take some pressure.
                        I just need one more tool,just one!

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                        • #13
                          I've seen a lot of engine cases, and case covers patched up at the race track to make the Sunday finals. I've never had to do it, but I know it works. Sucks for the welder that tries to fix it right afterwards though. I have been that guy though lol.

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                          • #14
                            I re furbished a steering wheel on my Power King last year. Took me about a week, but it look like new after a paint job and sealer.
                            Used one full professional tube of JB Weld.
                            olf20 / Bob
                            You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 2 photos.

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                            • #15
                              I have used JB Weld, and the 2 part black and white LocTite epoxy mix
                              (same thing, both methacrylate esters) on the worn cylinder bores of
                              small engines. Think engines that are not worth much, but need fixing.
                              I have done aluminum bore Briggs and Tecumseh engines with great
                              success. Rough up the bores with a hone, clean with lacquer thinner
                              until a white towel remains clean, and apply the epoxy with a wood stick.
                              When it is cured, use a coarse stone to knock down the high lumps, and
                              use lots of WD40 as not to load up the stones. You are left with a filled in
                              wear area of the cylinder, and you can see the unworn area left that is
                              above the rings area. Use new standard size rings, file fit and run it.
                              I have done this to maybe 4 or 5 engines over the years. Tear them down
                              some years later, and the epoxy is still there and holding up well. Seriously.
                              I have even built up the pitted and worn areas of shafts where an oil lip seal
                              rides. Works great on the pitman shaft of power steering boxes.
                              An iron block might be worth boring and getting oversize piston(s).
                              But aluminum blocks that you don't want to spend too much money on,
                              the epoxy trick works surprisingly well. I actually could not believe how well
                              it lasts, until I took the head off to inspect it years later. WB weld is not a
                              magic bullet. It won't repair threads that you expect to be strong again.
                              But for some things, it works well.

                              --Doozer
                              DZER

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