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  • #16
    My friend says it has a high enough heat resistance you can use it like body filler on something you will powdercoat. I haven't tried it though.
    I cut it off twice; it's still too short
    Oregon, USA

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Tim Clarke View Post
      My friend says it has a high enough heat resistance you can use it like body filler on something you will powdercoat. I haven't tried it though.
      I've done this, and it works fine, but I found that even after the 24 hour JB cure time, I had to pre-bake the filled piece after sanding. If I didn't do that, the JB Weld would outgas during PC curing, giving a rough finish. Maybe a longer air cure time for the JB would have worked as well.

      Ed
      For just a little more, you can do it yourself!

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      • #18
        I used to use LPS Rapid Strong Steel. It was a two part mix 50/50. Same stuff that came in the gas tank repair kits. I guess the company discontinued it so I found this at the local auto parts store, same stuff.

        https://duckduckgo.com/?q=permatex%2...fab&atb=v224-1

        JL.............

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        • #19
          A quick search (uk) and I'm seeing J-B HighHeat resistant 8297. Also Marine version 8272, Clear weld 50112, 8265 Cold weld, 8267 steel Stik putty, Funnily the 'genuine pro size' looks the same size as the others but is one fifth the price on ebay.

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          • #20
            I've found JB to be good- the usual practices apply of course- proper cleaning of the surfaces, a 1 to 1 mixing ratio, and enough cure time. It seems that the bond is much stronger after 48 hours than it is at 24 hours. As far as cleaning the surfaces, I often use brake clean- but I don't think it leaves a perfectly clean result. A final wipe with acetone seems to be better.

            I don't think I've ever seen a JB bond break within the JB- it's always been where the JB has released from one of the surfaces. That tells the story right there- surface prep is very important.

            And one more thing- you must resist the urge to wipe your fingers across the cleaned areas. That's such an easy and common thing to do- but what you are actually doing is adding a release agent where you don't want it.
            Last edited by darryl; 04-25-2022, 07:32 PM.
            I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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            • #21
              Rather than telling someone a repair was performed with JB Weld, say that the job was done with an Additive Machining process that utilized composite materials.

              Based on Doozer's positive experience with building up cylinder bores, a challenge for one of the HSM members is to build an operating scale model engine featuring cylinders and cases machined from JB-W castings.

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              • #22
                I’m surprised/impressed that worked on engine bores.

                I used JB successfully on a badly gouged bore of a hydraulic cylinder. Goal was a smooth surface for seals to ride but I feared it would flake as the tube strained. Years later and all good.

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                • #23
                  J-B weld actually carries some pretty fair numbers as far as two part epoxy adhesives and fillers go. I like 3M 2216 for stuff I care about, but that is $100 a kit.
                  One kink I use for metal applications is to mix into the epoxy sifted cast iron milling fines. Cuts down on the "running out" as the stuff kicks, and makes for a easily machined material with good color. Very useful!

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by SVS View Post
                    I’m surprised/impressed that worked on engine bores.

                    I used JB successfully on a badly gouged bore of a hydraulic cylinder. Goal was a smooth surface for seals to ride but I feared it would flake as the tube strained. Years later and all good.
                    I used "filled J-B) to repair a gouged hydraulic actuator in an automatic transmission.(4L30e) Worked perfectly for over ten years while I had the rig. Sold the vehicle a year ago, I hear all is well still....

                    Heat, much over 260 degrees would give me worries. Epoxy has a quality called the "glass transition temperature" It starts moving around under stress. Even if it remains "strong", it's just not stiff.
                    Last edited by CalM; 04-26-2022, 12:34 AM.

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                    • #25
                      Don't you folks know that JB Weld is only used by hillbillies, youtube "content creators", and folks with "mullet" haircuts? It's a marker for the "hold my beer and watch this" crowd.......
                      4357 2773 5647 3671 3645 0087 1276

                      CNC machines only go through the motions

                      "There's no pleasing these serpents"......Lewis Carroll

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                      • #26
                        Does redneck and had a mullet for a year during college count?

                        I do feel a bit naughty using JB…….



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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by SVS View Post
                          .............................................

                          I do feel a bit naughty using JB…….
                          Feeling guilty is the first step towards freedom from addiction.................

                          BTW, rednecks usually know how to do things. That's different from the "hold my beer" bunch.
                          4357 2773 5647 3671 3645 0087 1276

                          CNC machines only go through the motions

                          "There's no pleasing these serpents"......Lewis Carroll

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                          • #28
                            😁😁😁

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                            • #29
                              I needed a high temperature repair a while back and I did some research on the various epoxies that are commonly available and do not require a second mortgage on the house. JBWeld is the one that came out on top. And yes, the slow cure version, not the quick one. That repair came out OK and is still going strong after a year or so.
                              Paul A.
                              SE Texas

                              And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                              You will find that it has discrete steps.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Doozer View Post
                                I have used JB Weld, and the 2 part black and white LocTite epoxy mix
                                (same thing, both methacrylate esters) on the worn cylinder bores of
                                small engines. Think engines that are not worth much, but need fixing.
                                I have done aluminum bore Briggs and Tecumseh engines with great
                                success. Rough up the bores with a hone, clean with lacquer thinner
                                until a white towel remains clean, and apply the epoxy with a wood stick.
                                When it is cured, use a coarse stone to knock down the high lumps, and
                                use lots of WD40 as not to load up the stones. You are left with a filled in
                                wear area of the cylinder, and you can see the unworn area left that is
                                above the rings area. Use new standard size rings, file fit and run it.
                                I have done this to maybe 4 or 5 engines over the years. Tear them down
                                some years later, and the epoxy is still there and holding up well. Seriously.
                                I have even built up the pitted and worn areas of shafts where an oil lip seal
                                rides. Works great on the pitman shaft of power steering boxes.
                                An iron block might be worth boring and getting oversize piston(s).
                                But aluminum blocks that you don't want to spend too much money on,
                                the epoxy trick works surprisingly well. I actually could not believe how well
                                it lasts, until I took the head off to inspect it years later. WB weld is not a
                                magic bullet. It won't repair threads that you expect to be strong again.
                                But for some things, it works well.

                                --Doozer
                                Back in the day, Ford had a run of 302 blocks that had porous spots on the outside of the water jacket. The factory repair kit was epoxy that looked and smelled just like JB Weld. Drain, heat, clean, apply, cure, refill, and go.

                                BTW- Briggs say to never hone their aluminium bore.YMMV.

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