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Adding a 2k ohm resistor to drop 24v to 5v question

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  • #16
    My drives are 220v closed loop to three phase 20nm stepper motors. They are not Leadshine drives and motors.
    Click image for larger version

Name:	drive wiring.jpg
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ID:	1998251
    Location: The Black Forest in Germany

    How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

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    • #17
      Originally posted by mikey553 View Post
      Your wiring diagram shows a common anode connection of the stepper drives. All positive PUL, DIR and ENA terminals are connected together and go to V1 on the Meanwell RD-35B, which is +5VDC. Negative PUL, DIR and DENA terminals are connected to the Acorn board, which controls all stepper drives.

      So it looks like you have 5V control voltage for the drives and do not need any resistors in series. Where did you get the idea that you need them?
      What is the Meanwell device? Is it just a power supply to the Acorn and stepper drives?
      The Meanwell only powers the Acorn board and the homing switches.
      Location: The Black Forest in Germany

      How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

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      • #18
        https://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/02...-D508.pdf?2956
        Page 6 confirms my suspicion the series resistors are added when using a higher voltage to satisfy an opto coupler input current.
        Not needed for 5v as the resistor for 5v is internal.

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        • #19
          .dele

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Black Forest View Post
            My drives are 220v closed loop to three phase 20nm stepper motors. They are not Leadshine drives and motors.
            Click image for larger version

Name:	drive wiring.jpg
Views:	160
Size:	134.1 KB
ID:	1998251
            So you are saying that your wiring diagram showing 3 Leadshine drives is wrong? Where did you get the idea that stepper drives are powered by 220V?

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            • #21
              This is getting confusing? 🤔

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              • #22
                Had a similar experience using an adurino to control steeper motors. Ended up just using a usb charger cube and usb cable.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by no704 View Post
                  Had a similar experience using an adurino to control steeper motors. Ended up just using a usb charger cube and usb cable.
                  Arduino with stepper motor drive and motor is next for me. Actually Arduino can be powered via USB port (5 VDC), its power socket (7-12 VDC) or directly to the board. Connecting Arduino to the drive is another story.

                  Just 2 months ago I did not know anything about Arduino and stepper motors and drives. But an interesting project came up and I have educated myself a little. It's a steep learning curve, but nothing too complicated for a hobby machinist.

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                  • #24
                    The inputs will just be optoisolators so all you are doing is adding more resistance to limit the current to the led in the opto. Alarm is an output which tells the controller the drive has faulted. It is the output side of an opto, it does not need a resistor.

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                    • #25
                      Black Forest,
                      The schematic in post 9 shows, what look to me like, stepper motor drive outputs (A+, A-, B+, B-) while the drawing for the motor in post 16 shows 3 motor connections, U, V, and W, which are usually associated with brushless servo motors. Your schematics don't match.
                      Last edited by genea; 04-26-2022, 12:56 AM.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by genea View Post
                        Black Forest,
                        The schematic in post 9 shows, what look to me like, stepper motor drive outputs (A+, A-, B+, B-) while the drawing for the motor in post 16 shows 3 motor connections, U, V, and W, which are usually associated with brushless servo motors. Your schematics don't match.
                        I tried to post the manual for the motors and drives but this site won't let me attach a .pdf

                        The motors and drives a 220v AC closed loop steppers. Sorry for the confusion. The wiring diagram that has the leadshine drives is to show how my drives get the signal wires connected to them. This was the schematic Centroid provided me to show how to wire my drives to the Acorn. Only the signal wires are relevant in that drawing. My drives and motors work fine connected to the Acorn. I just don't have the enable and alarm signal wires connected yet. That is the reason for this post. I suppose I should have posted my question on the Centroid forum but I really really don't like going there. It is much worse than Practical Machinist when asking newbie questions.
                        Location: The Black Forest in Germany

                        How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

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                        • #27
                          This is a picture of my drives and motors.
                          Click image for larger version

Name:	drive and motor.jpg
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ID:	1998312
                          Location: The Black Forest in Germany

                          How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            As for attaching a PDF you can take a screen capture by pressing the Print Screen button on any PC and then opening the Paint program and pressing Ctrl-V to paste the screen shot into the window. Then just save it AS a JPG file and that can be posted. The same thing works for almost anything you can get on your computer screen.

                            As for your connection, your inputs do sound a lot like opto isolated ones. This type of input is frequently used to prevent damage to the computer board. In any case, only one resistor is needed for each input. And you can put it on either the + or the - terminal of that input, IN SERIES.

                            You can just solder the resistor to one of the leads from the switch and then attach the other side of the resistor to the input, but it is a lot better to mount it in some way or another. If there are connectors that go to these inputs, you may be able to solder the resistor to the connection side of the pin and solder the wire to the resistor with a short piece of heat shrink tubing to cover that solder joint. Then the shell of the connector would cover all that and protect it from harm. Otherwise, a terminal board mounted somewhere and protected by a cover (or inside a small project box) would be the best way to do it. Bring your switch cable to the terminal board and run one wire through the resistor. Then a second cable from the terminal board to the input connection you are working with. You would use three terminals on the terminal board: 1, 2, and 3. The cable from your switch goes to 1 and 2. The resistor from 2 to 3. And the cable to your input from 1 and 3.

                            A quick calculation tells me that you need a 0.2 Watt resistor. Normal practice is to double the maximum amount of power needed which would be 0.4 Watts in this case, so a 1/2 Watt resistor would be recommended. If it is in open air with at least some clearance on ALL sides you may get away with a 1/4 Watt, but if it is against a circuit board or in an enclosed box or covered with tape or heat shrink tubing, then the 1/2 Watt is definitely the way to go.



                            Originally posted by Black Forest View Post

                            I tried to post the manual for the motors and drives but this site won't let me attach a .pdf

                            The motors and drives a 220v AC closed loop steppers. Sorry for the confusion. The wiring diagram that has the leadshine drives is to show how my drives get the signal wires connected to them. This was the schematic Centroid provided me to show how to wire my drives to the Acorn. Only the signal wires are relevant in that drawing. My drives and motors work fine connected to the Acorn. I just don't have the enable and alarm signal wires connected yet. That is the reason for this post. I suppose I should have posted my question on the Centroid forum but I really really don't like going there. It is much worse than Practical Machinist when asking newbie questions.
                            Paul A.
                            SE Texas

                            And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                            You will find that it has discrete steps.

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                            • #29
                              Now wait. This is a photo of a motor and motor control box. And you previously posted a wiring diagram of an Acorn CNC controller with three motor controls attached. And the wiring went straight from the Acorn to the motor controls.

                              The Acorn is very likely only 5 Volts or perhaps a combination of 5 V and 3.3 V. So where does the 24 Volts come into play? Do you have a complete package with the wire harness that connects these components, or are you trying to connect the Acorn to the motor controls yourself. Are you trying to make that wire harness yourself?

                              Something does not jive here.



                              Originally posted by Black Forest View Post
                              This is a picture of my drives and motors.
                              Click image for larger version

Name:	drive and motor.jpg
Views:	107
Size:	103.3 KB
ID:	1998312
                              Paul A.
                              SE Texas

                              And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                              You will find that it has discrete steps.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                You all get easily confused! The picture of the Acorn board is an example of how my drives get wired to the Acorn. My drives take 5v logic signals. What I am not sure of is are the inputs that the Alarm and enable connect to will be putting 24v out to the motor driver. I think I will have to brave the Centroid forum and ask over there what voltage goes from what to where. Wish me luck.
                                Location: The Black Forest in Germany

                                How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

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