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Ideas for storing acrylic solvent cement so it won't evaporate?

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  • Ideas for storing acrylic solvent cement so it won't evaporate?

    Stuff like Scigrip 3, basically methylene chloride, is something I need to have around, but don't use frequently. It's extremely volatile, comes in a screw top can, and no matter how hard I screw it on, within a few years 90% of it ends up lost to evaporation not fabrication! The can seems to have a polyethylene seal. Is there any better way to store this stuff? Or do I just suck it up like I've been doing, as it's only $19/pt?
    Location: Jersey City NJ USA

  • #2
    I store most everything upside down. Product will seal the cap. Had good luck with everything from catalysts to paint.

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    • #3
      If your use is so infrequent, why not sub out your acrylic fabrication?

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      • #4
        Since it is a solvent I don't think storing the container upside down will have much effect. That works on things that can harden in the small openings. A solvent style adhesive will just go right through, probably faster when you present the fluid to those openings instead of just the vapor.

        This probably won't stop the loss, but perhaps slow it down. As the old joke says, double bag it. Store the original container inside a second, larger, sealed container. Of course, that second container would also need to be something the solvent does not dissolve because the space between the two containers will become saturated with fumes after some time.
        Last edited by Paul Alciatore; 04-29-2022, 01:52 AM.
        Paul A.
        SE Texas

        And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
        You will find that it has discrete steps.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by gellfex View Post
          Stuff like Scigrip 3, basically methylene chloride, is something I need to have around, but don't use frequently. It's extremely volatile, comes in a screw top can, and no matter how hard I screw it on, within a few years 90% of it ends up lost to evaporation not fabrication! The can seems to have a polyethylene seal. Is there any better way to store this stuff? Or do I just suck it up like I've been doing, as it's only $19/pt?

          Yeah. Took me a second, but I did learn. Only buy what you need (pricey) for the job at hand with any adhesives.

          Could be tub caulk, window caulk. Silicon tubes for windows. Latex? Fast acting glue like super glue. They all have a very short shelf life.

          These days I buy (too expensive) adhesives as I need them for the job. JR

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          • #6
            I am not sure about this, but... How about double sealing the cap when the project is finished? Screw the cap on tight, possibly with a large O-ring as a second seal between the bottom of the cap and the can and then seal again with some type of glue, sealant or even melted wax over the whole cap area. It would be a PITA to uncap, but if done infrequently it may be worth it. Next option is like JR said, buy only what you need and write off the excess.
            Robin

            Happily working on my second million Gave up on the first

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            • #7
              Methylene chloride is not something you want evaporating in your shop. Good ventilation is strongly recommended. Ok, that was just a safety concern.

              It did just occur to me that perhaps keeping your supply cold would reduce the evaporation rate.
              I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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              • #8
                How about putting the bottle in one of those stainless steel thermos type containers modified so it can be pressurized? A little pressure plus the added insulation could do the trick.


                https://www.amazon.com/-/es/Tarro-al...s%2C132&sr=8-1
                Helder Ferreira
                Setubal, Portugal

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                • #9
                  Had a 1 litre can that lasted for years, the missus was swearing at me when I put it in the fridge, BUT it works.

                  The warm temperature is what makes that volatile stuff evaporate, cool it down and it just about stops the evaporation all together.

                  Go ahead and laugh, but if you try it, you'll soon stop laughing.

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                  • #10
                    Put the bottle in a bucket of water.

                    -D
                    DZER

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                    • #11
                      Used to use it at work. Best way we found to store it was to decant it into smaller steel cans with screw top lids as we used. The less air space/surface area the longer it lasted.
                      Ontario, Canada

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                      • #12
                        I put it inside another bottle - Double storage .
                        Same as Nitro-methane , it goes fast
                        Also bottle super glues
                        Keep out of the sun and anywhere it is warm

                        Rich

                        Nitro is a cleaner used before super glue.. a Evan Hint
                        Green Bay, WI

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post
                          If your use is so infrequent, why not sub out your acrylic fabrication?
                          that would be very inconvenient and cost far more than replacing the can.


                          Originally posted by JRouche View Post
                          Yeah. Took me a second, but I did learn. Only buy what you need (pricey) for the job at hand with any adhesives.

                          Could be tub caulk, window caulk. Silicon tubes for windows. Latex? Fast acting glue like super glue. They all have a very short shelf life.

                          These days I buy (too expensive) adhesives as I need them for the job. JR
                          Yes, I've learned a lot of those lessons. I buy the 10 pack of little super glue tubes rather than the bottle. Saw a trick for caulks etc, to put them tip down in water, same as a cut avocado. There may not be a good way with this, but it was worth asking, you never know...

                          Originally posted by greenie View Post
                          Had a 1 litre can that lasted for years, the missus was swearing at me when I put it in the fridge, BUT it works.

                          The warm temperature is what makes that volatile stuff evaporate, cool it down and it just about stops the evaporation all together.

                          Go ahead and laugh, but if you try it, you'll soon stop laughing.
                          I catch enough crap for the bait in the freezer or occasional worms in the fridge! Besides, any evaporation would make the fridge smell nasty.

                          ​​​​​​​
                          Originally posted by rdfeil View Post
                          I am not sure about this, but... How about double sealing the cap when the project is finished? Screw the cap on tight, possibly with a large O-ring as a second seal between the bottom of the cap and the can and then seal again with some type of glue, sealant or even melted wax over the whole cap area. It would be a PITA to uncap, but if done infrequently it may be worth it. Next option is like JR said, buy only what you need and write off the excess.
                          Hmm, the mention of an O-ring gives me an idea. The can comes with a metal seal in the ~1.5" opening that you have to pierce or remove. What if I got an O-ring that fit just inside the screw rim on this seal? It might provide a better seal than the thin flat seal in the cap. Anyone know what material would be impervious to the solvent?

                          I don't know if putting the can in a tupperware would do it, the container would need to be able to resist whatever the vapor pressure is of this stuff.
                          Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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                          • #14
                            Isn't methylene chloride the component they removed from paint stripper that actually made it work?
                            Nasty stuff, I know, but can you add it to the products it was removed from?
                            Asking for a friend.
                            Len

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Len View Post
                              Isn't methylene chloride the component they removed from paint stripper that actually made it work?
                              Nasty stuff, I know, but can you add it to the products it was removed from?
                              Asking for a friend.
                              Don't see why not if it's a solvent based not citrus or lye or such. as I recall stripper is methylene chloride, ethanol, and lacquer thinner with a thickening agent.
                              Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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