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Ideas for storing acrylic solvent cement so it won't evaporate?

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  • #31
    I've never heard of the stuff before.......... "SCIGRIP 3* is a water-thin, non-flammable cement formulated to quickly develop high strength, clear bonds to many thermoplastic substrates, particularly acrylic"

    Being non flammable ??? isn't methylene chloride flammable ?? Lasting a couple years in a can isn't bad. I have lacquer thinner in factory steel cans stored longer than that and I haven't notices any evaporation.

    Does it strip paint ??? If so I need some. That's the main ingredient they removed from stripper that made it worthless.

    JL...........

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    • #32
      Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
      I've never heard of the stuff before.......... "SCIGRIP 3* is a water-thin, non-flammable cement formulated to quickly develop high strength, clear bonds to many thermoplastic substrates, particularly acrylic"

      Being non flammable ??? isn't methylene chloride flammable ?? Lasting a couple years in a can isn't bad. I have lacquer thinner in factory steel cans stored longer than that and I haven't notices any evaporation.

      Does it strip paint ??? If so I need some. That's the main ingredient they removed from stripper that made it worthless.

      JL...........
      Not flammable according the can. Methylene chloride will run you $77 gal from McMaster, but if you're in CA, CO, CT, DE, MD, NH, NY, RI, UT you're SOL.
      Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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      • #33
        full disclosure--i didn't read the rest of the thread.

        but I repack stuff like that into syringes. started doing that with PVC cement years ago after many many dried out cans. and as a side note, PVC cement will make a good mechanical weld in acrylic, though it wont look as nice.
        "it is no measure of mental health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society." -- krishnamurti
        "look deep into nature, and then you will understand everything better." -- albert einstien
        "any intelligent fool can make things bigger and more complex...It takes a touch of genius - and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction."

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        • #34
          Originally posted by bborr01 View Post
          I used to have our chemists make a solution for melting plexiglas and lexan together and as I recall they mixed 10% methyl chloride and 90% acetone or possibly the other way around. They gave it to me in a glass bottle with a ground glass stopper and that kept it pretty well contained but it still would evaporate some over the years.
          This is getting close to the real answer. A pharmacist friend of Dad's gave him the tip to use a bottle with a ground-glass stopper and smear it with soft soap when sealing it. This was for storing chloroform, which Dad used for welding acryic. Chloroform is a very close relative of dichloromethane (it's actually trichloromethane). It was very effective.

          Mind you, I don't know where you would get the real soft soap these days, or whether the modern replacements would be as effective.

          George

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          • #35
            Originally posted by gellfex View Post
            .... 6063 ....
            That doesn't dry out as I remember, and as a result you don't have to worry about evaporation.

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            • #36
              This works for me. I do a couple turns of electrical tape around the glass jar lid for long term storage. Had some of this stuff last for years! Also keep it in the house where the temperature is stable instead of the shop where it's up and down daily/nightly.
              Seafarer
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              • #37
                Originally posted by JRouche View Post


                Yeah. Took me a second, but I did learn. Only buy what you need (pricey) for the job at hand with any adhesives.

                Could be tub caulk, window caulk. Silicon tubes for windows. Latex? Fast acting glue like super glue. They all have a very short shelf life.

                These days I buy (too expensive) adhesives as I need them for the job. JR
                You can also keep them in the fridge which slows down the loss of the volatiles and makes them last longer. Some adhesives require it for longer term storage, mostly the ones with expiration dates.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by macona View Post

                  You can also keep them in the fridge which slows down the loss of the volatiles and makes them last longer. Some adhesives require it for longer term storage, mostly the ones with expiration dates.
                  Mentioned upthread, but some of us have spouses that might object to the smell!
                  Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by gellfex View Post

                    Mentioned upthread, but some of us have spouses that might object to the smell!
                    That can be ans excuse to have a shop fridge that can be stocked with beer another volatile substance
                    Helder Ferreira
                    Setubal, Portugal

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