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Mini Review - Accusize 1.25" end mill with R8 shank

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  • Mini Review - Accusize 1.25" end mill with R8 shank

    The nice Amazon man just delivered my new small size milling tool that for my machine is a suitable size for roughing mill scale material down in prep for further work.

    It's an Accusize branded 1.25" diameter three cutter direct R8 shank cutter. Price up my way in Canada was $80. This is roughly $20 more than the two piece shank with shell style cutter.

    Click image for larger version

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    I opted for this style the two piece options because the one piece design makes for a lot less tool overhang. Actually just 1.8" or 47mm as seen in the second picture just above. My thinking was that this diameter would be far more in tune with the size and weight of my mini knee mill. And certainly should be a LOT better than the laughable 3" four cutter jobbie that came with the mill. That one turns my mill into an opera singer with any but the lightest of cuts at lower speeds.

    This one delivers! I squared up the block shown below with cuts from .005" to .025" running at a conservative 745 RPM. I fed fast enough to form proper chips rather than dust and all that happened was that metal was quietly converted to curly chips with no sound other than the motor and a slight sizzle sound as the inserts peeled the metal away. The silence was non music to my ears....

    Click image for larger version

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    I did run into one pretty easily done "tune up". At first the finish was leaving a noticeable deeper groove mark that I could catch with a finger nail.

    I felt penned the three tips and ran it back over a cut surface. One of the tips got polished a little stronger than the other two. I removed that insert and lightly polished the upper positioning taper on the seat just a whisker with a few dabs of a rubberized polishing cone in a rotary tool. The couple of tenths this removed did the trick and the swirl scratches were gone. Re-inking showed similar wear on all three ends. Running a fresh .007" off the previously done face gave the surface shown in the last pic above. The finish shows the sort of swirl pattern seen with many rotary cutters but now my fingernail does not catch at all. In fact it feels as smooth to my fingernail as the ground taper cone on the arbor seen in that same pic. A pretty fair trade for the fairly low cost for this cutter.

    So for those of you like me that have mills that are smaller and lighter I can strongly recommend this as an option.

    Next up is to order up some additional APKT inserts for both steel and the nicely polished and deeply cupped versions for aluminium. I might even go crazy and buy a second tool to hold the set of inserts for the aluminium.

    CHEERS
    BCR
    Chilliwack BC, Canada

  • #2
    I have a 2" or 3" Accusize face mill that I love, does a great job in the Bridgeport.

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    • #3
      Nice addition BC those look like 1604’s,I’m sure you will get lot’s of mileage with those.I have a 1-1/2” Ingersoll that takes 4 of the same inserts,looking for a 6” but have not found a deal yet.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by RB211 View Post
        I have a 2" or 3" Accusize face mill that I love, does a great job in the Bridgeport.
        I wondered if my mill MIGHT tolerate a 2". But that lousy 3" was and would be such a problem that when I found this 1.25 I figured "better safe than sorry".... If I'd found a 1.5 that took the APKT1604's (yes TTT, that's the size of the inserts on this tool) I think I'd have gone with that and it would be fine. But as the old saying goes it really doesn't matter which size we get it'll always be too small for some jobs. And this one is doing such a nice and seemingly effortless job of chewing up the metal and removing the mill scale and any rust that I'll just smile and make an extra pass or two....

        I'll update with how it works on aluminum once I get in an order of inserts... And maybe a second tool for the new inserts.....
        Chilliwack BC, Canada

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        • #5
          Facing mill.
          Not an end mill.
          I implore you to try and plunge that sucker.

          -D
          DZER

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          • #6
            Nice review. I just ordered a 1" ap* insert stick tool, and a 2 piece 2"/r8 one as well. Also ordered a couple packs of different ap inserts for various materials. Nice to see I didn't waste money.

            I'm going to turn the shank down on the 1" to 3/4" and shrink a collar on for the TTS system, and make a tts holder for the 2" facemill, so I can swap it back and forth from manual to the Tormach.

            I also just remembered I forgot to bring the 1" tool into work for the 2nd day in a row to turn down the shank. I don't think my myford is up to the task, and I don't even want to try. It'll probably be a few weeks before the 2" and the other boxes of inserts get here on the slow boat.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Doozer View Post
              Facing mill.
              Not an end mill.
              I implore you to try and plunge that sucker.

              -D
              I guess you are not aware of non-center cutting endmills


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              • #8
                By attempting to expose my ignorance,
                you are exposing your own.

                -D
                DZER

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                • #9
                  You clearly implied that the tool BCRider posted is not an endmill because it will not plunge. If you look at the endmill on the right side of the pic I posted you can see that it also will not plunge. That is a non-center cutting endmill.

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                  • #10
                    I would refer to that tool as an "indexable face and shoulder milling cutter". That is assuming the sides are parallel to the axis. One of my 50mm shell mills looks like the rest, but the sides cut a couple of degrees from 90, it is labeled "not square".
                    Last edited by old mart; 05-03-2022, 01:27 PM.

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                    • #11
                      The Ingersoll cutter I have is classified as a EndMill. Click image for larger version

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by old mart View Post
                        I would refer to that tool as an "indexable face and shoulder milling cutter". That is assuming the sides are parallel to the axis. One of my 50mm shell mills looks like the rest, but the sides cut a couple of degrees from 90, it is labeled "not square".
                        I got this tool primarily for facing. Didn't really give the idea of shoulders much thought. But looking at it the inserts are certainly held such that it SHOULD be able to side cuts up to the height of the inserts. So shoulders or multi pass end and side cuts are certainly an option. I'll try some end dressing today and report back.

                        Doozer, we got you this time Of the 30 something 4 flute end mill cutters I've got only two of them are center cutting and thus plunge worthy. From my perspective a facing only mill is shaped such that it can't do any side cutting. So something like THIS ONE is truly a facing only mill. Those like mine and others with the APKT inserts held vertically all look like they can do side cuts as well. Now how WELL they will do side cuts? I'll get back to the flock with that in a while. With the widely spaced cutters I'm thinking that shallow cuts will slam a lot. We'll see.
                        Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                        • #13
                          Most of this type can cut both axes, but only testing will confirm just how well. Try with a vertical face, take a small depth cut using 80% of the length of the inserts, and then go down another 80% and see how good the combined surface is. There will always be a rad in corners as APKT don't have sharp corners. You mentioned getting a second one to have a pair with different inserts, if the finances allow, it would be a great idea. These cutters will rotate at speeds greater than most manual mills can manage. I have a CERATIZIT 50mm 5 insert shell mill which has a max speed of about 11000rpm.
                          For roughing mill scale, you should try a box of the cheapest Chinese inserts, they might save you a lot of money.
                          Last edited by old mart; 05-03-2022, 02:18 PM.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by old mart View Post
                            Most of this type can cut both axes, but only testing will confirm just how well. Try with a vertical face, take a small depth cut using 80% of the length of the inserts, and then go down another 80% and see how good the combined surface is. There will always be a rad in corners as APKT don't have sharp corners. You mentioned getting a second one to have a pair with different inserts, if the finances allow, it would be a great idea.
                            The two or even three passes then check for ridges or ramps with transitions is what I'll do a bit later after brunch. And exactly my own thoughts on all the ideas in your post.... I think it's a French toast and sausages day......
                            Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                            • #15
                              FOOD.............a classic Homer Simpson exclamation.

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