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Mini Review - Accusize 1.25" end mill with R8 shank

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  • #31
    I bought a NOS 50mm twin insert cutter made by Maydown (believed to be out of buisiness, unfortunately), with two boxes of inserts for aluminium. It is R8 fitting and I bought it simply because of its extremely low profile. I may never be able to get any more inserts, but the triangular shape will give 30 loads, so I'm happy with that.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by old mart View Post
      I bought a NOS 50mm twin insert cutter made by Maydown (believed to be out of buisiness, unfortunately), with two boxes of inserts for aluminium. It is R8 fitting and I bought it simply because of its extremely low profile. I may never be able to get any more inserts, but the triangular shape will give 30 loads, so I'm happy with that.

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      Those look like standard inserts

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      • #33
        As I said, there is no real reason to get any more of the inserts for the Maydown cutter, there are actually 33 loads, I forgot the two already in use, and they will only be used on non ferrous. Unfortunately the boxes do not have their labels.


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        • #34
          Originally posted by RB211 View Post

          Those look like standard inserts
          I'm sure that a standard triangle insert could fit. But the tip shape of the specific inserts seen on the cutter is not standard.

          Oldmart, I 'm sure I've seen that shape on some cutters from other makers in the past few years. It might not be as hard to find some replacements or alternative cutting edge inserts for different uses as you think.

          As a quick check I found these links which suggest that you might have some options if you need them.

          HS6NP, 2-1/2" Diameter Shell Mill, 3/4" Pilot Bore x 90° Lead Angle, 5 Inserts (Trigon), Negative/Positive Geometry, TSC (haascnc.com)
          PVD CVD TPKN2204PDER Triangle Carbide Inserts For Roughing Face Milling (cnccarbideinserts.com)
          TUNGALOY Triangle Milling Insert: 0.339 in Inscribed Circle, 0.40mm Corner Radius, 0.185 in Thick - 38UE83|6999150 - Grainger

          No idea if any of these fit YOUR cutter but it shows that Maydown wasn't the only option that used these special corner shaped triangle inserts.
          Chilliwack BC, Canada

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          • #35
            I have the same face mill. Use it for facing Aluminum in my KX3 CNC mill. Only problem is staying out of the wa of the random chip...

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            • #36
              Originally posted by kf2qd View Post
              I have the same face mill. Use it for facing Aluminum in my KX3 CNC mill. Only problem is staying out of the wa of the random chip...
              The Accusize or Old Mart's Maydown cutter?

              Either way it's already a bit of a chip tosser at the lower speed. For aluminium where I'd fer sure be at 1500RPM I think I'd want to make up a bit of a shield for chip control. Otherwise I'd glitter'ize the whole shop ! ! ! ! But then larger cutting diameters of any sort seem to love doing that. Any flycutter is wonderful for "spreading the love"....
              Chilliwack BC, Canada

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              • #37
                When I was still working, our firm had a huge manual horizontal Wadkin mill with a BT50 spindle. With a 15" facemill, Wally could chuck swarf 50 feet, and did with every job until the complaints got too much. He had a mean streak.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by old mart View Post
                  When I was still working, our firm had a huge manual horizontal Wadkin mill with a BT50 spindle. With a 15" facemill, Wally could chuck swarf 50 feet, and did with every job until the complaints got too much. He had a mean streak.
                  That Machine sounds amazing,I did not know Wadkin made Metal Working Machines.The Wood Machines I’ve seen(I own 2) are near the Weight&Stout of a lot of Metal Machines.

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                  • #39
                    I wonder how your APKT inserts would work on Dura-Bar ?
                    Larry - west coast of Canada

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Cuttings View Post
                      I wonder how your APKT inserts would work on Dura-Bar ?
                      Dura-Bar is a cast iron material? If this is the case I've got a couple of scraps of cast that were cut off some castings. Not technically Dura-Bar but I can at least give you an idea of how it looks on cast iron.
                      Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                      • #41
                        OK if you don't mind. I have a chunk of round Dura-bar that I might want to mill some flats on. And , yes Dura-bar is a type of cast iron known as Ductile iron. Nice stuff to machine, no hard spots.
                        Last edited by Cuttings; 05-10-2022, 12:27 PM.
                        Larry - west coast of Canada

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Tundra Twin Track View Post

                          That Machine sounds amazing,I did not know Wadkin made Metal Working Machines.The Wood Machines I’ve seen(I own 2) are near the Weight&Stout of a lot of Metal Machines.
                          I have tried and failed to find any information on that Wadkin, it stood 18 feet high and had a bed about 5 by 9, feet that is. It was used mostly for roughing large billets to save time when they went onto the cnc mills.

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                          • #43
                            Re-reading the earlier posts, I have to agree with Doozer on the center cutting endmills vs facing mills. Side cutting is a poor argument as a face mill has to side cut to even function as a face mill.
                            To throw more gasoline into the debate, with CNC, theoretically could you circle interpolate a plunge with a non center cutting endmill if the radial step over is set correctly? And if so, is that why industry doesn’t seem too concerned about terminology in regards to this debate?

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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by old mart View Post

                              I have tried and failed to find any information on that Wadkin, it stood 18 feet high and had a bed about 5 by 9, feet that is. It was used mostly for roughing large billets to save time when they went onto the cnc mills.
                              At that SIZE it might fit in my Shop with 18’ ceiling but don’t think the 7-1/2” of reinforced concrete would hold it,probably 3 to 5 HP lol!🤓

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                              • #45
                                Originally posted by RB211 View Post
                                To throw more gasoline into the debate, with CNC, theoretically could you circle interpolate a plunge with a non center cutting endmill if the radial step over is set correctly? And if so, is that why industry doesn’t seem too concerned about terminology in regards to this debate?
                                Yes, I used similar cutters all the time to rough profile and pocket. Shallow depths of cuts (.010" - .030") and extremely fast feeds were used. Step downs were ramped at an angle shallow enough that the body of the mill wouldn't hit.

                                They were always called end mills in the shops I worked in. However, I worked at enough shops in enough different areas to know that terminology varies. Every shop seems to have their own terms for some things and every shop has those who think that's the only way it can be. I never got too hung up on it, just called things by the name my current shop was using.
                                George
                                Traverse City, MI

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