Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Lathe rescue

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • davidwdyer
    replied
    Originally posted by Noitoen View Post

    Usa o velho ditado "Os cães ladram mas a caravana passa" Na minha opinião, há aqueles que fazem coisas e há aqueles que dizem que fazem.
    Ta.

    Leave a comment:


  • Noitoen
    replied
    Originally posted by davidwdyer View Post

    Infelizmente, isso é a verdade. Tem hora em que tenho receio postar aqui por causa das críticas que a gente recebe.
    Usa o velho ditado "Os cães ladram mas a caravana passa" Na minha opinião, há aqueles que fazem coisas e há aqueles que dizem que fazem.

    Leave a comment:


  • davidwdyer
    replied
    Originally posted by Noitoen View Post
    O Doozer é do contra e vai dizer mal de certeza
    Infelizmente, isso é a verdade. Tem hora em que tenho receio postar aqui por causa das críticas que a gente recebe.

    Leave a comment:


  • davidwdyer
    replied
    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
    Good work! I bet you will like it, it's a "REAL" lathe! Even Doozer would have to admit that.

    You can do a lot of good work on a worn lathe. I know, because that's the only kind I have ever worked with! I agree with the advice to use it and see how it is. If you do not turn long things, even a very worn lathe can be just fine.
    Thanks so much for the encouragement.

    Leave a comment:


  • Noitoen
    replied
    O Doozer é do contra e vai dizer mal de certeza

    Leave a comment:


  • boslab
    replied
    Well done, it makes me happy to see that a once prized machine has become relevant again, I’ve seen many many machines in the scrap yard to be “balled”
    that’s the process the metal recovery plant (MR plant) used to make scrap fit in the charging box in the steel plant, it consisted of dropping a 15 ton steel ball bearing on the “victim” using a magnet crane from about 30’ high, somthing used to jump inside me as the ball dropped, really good machines, some almost new if liquidators had bought a factory for scrap, tragic and needless imho I insisted they should have been sold non smashed , it was about then I discovered that everything is a consumable in the persuit of money, including people.
    I hope the old girl will turn (pun) out some good work (how much does it take up the spout, aka headstock bore diameter, if it’s big you can make a tidy living re roding hydraulic cylinders I have to put 2 out soon, probably over a grand for the 2, maybe more and basic work but I can’t fit them on my lathe, )
    mark

    Leave a comment:


  • J Tiers
    replied
    Good work! I bet you will like it, it's a "REAL" lathe! Even Doozer would have to admit that.

    You can do a lot of good work on a worn lathe. I know, because that's the only kind I have ever worked with! I agree with the advice to use it and see how it is. If you do not turn long things, even a very worn lathe can be just fine.

    Leave a comment:


  • davidwdyer
    replied
    The steady rest on the end of the lathe did not come with it. It was also found in the dirt at another salvage yard.

    When I first saw it just after buying the lathe, the guy wanted a lot of money for it. Just the other day I saw it again

    and the price had dropped by almost two thirds. Another reason I didn't buy it the first time (besides the price) was because it was too narrow for the lathe bed.

    But when he offered it to me for $240 I bought it and made a new base.

    Leave a comment:


  • davidwdyer
    replied
    Originally posted by old mart View Post
    You might not need the scraping done, it is surprising how well the turning for a worn lathe can be. Plenty of actual test turning is required, and you may find its strengths and weaknesses. A four jaw independent chuck would be nice, it could probably share the backplate with the scroll chuck.
    I'm sure a four jaw would be nice, but with the weight of that thing, I don't think I'll be changing it very often.

    I can only lift with the engine hoist seen in the background of the second picture.

    Leave a comment:


  • davidwdyer
    replied
    Originally posted by BCRider View Post
    Very nice work so far. And for a project which is not a restoration it looks like you've done a lot of restorative work...

    By all means do a series of checks for alignment and wear first to determine if there is enough wear to justify any scraping.

    I'm thinking you'd want to run the usual leveling and "two collar" alignment checks and any tuning to eliminate any bed twist that might be present due to how it is sitting on the floor. Part of that is that you can also check the tail stock for any off center and sag of the ram. For a new machine I'd say the two collar procedure to eliminate twist would be easily also the final setting. But for an older lathe I can see the advantage of first leveling the ends of the bed with a precision machinist's level and then checking with the level in a few ways for an initial test for wear on the ways.

    Another good option for checking for wear is a tested straight edge and shims. The straight edge is best if it's truly straight but even if there is an arch to it if you can confirm the amount with a surface plate or by other means (measure width over the length then test for height flipped each way) you can include this fudge factor in the tests done to the bed.

    It might well be that there's some but not enough wear to justify a full scraping job. Especially when it's just a hobby as you say. The nice thing about these tests is that much can be done with a dial or test gauge and a few good ways of holding the gauge.
    Yes, I've still got a lot of adjusting to do. I do have a "precision level" from China and amazingly, it is dead level as it sits. I also centered the live center with the chuck.

    It is a touch high, but left and right I got adjusted. I can see that several shims have been put in the tail stock to try to keep it level with the chuck.

    Leave a comment:


  • old mart
    replied
    You might not need the scraping done, it is surprising how well the turning for a worn lathe can be. Plenty of actual test turning is required, and you may find its strengths and weaknesses. A four jaw independent chuck would be nice, it could probably share the backplate with the scroll chuck.

    Leave a comment:


  • BCRider
    replied
    Very nice work so far. And for a project which is not a restoration it looks like you've done a lot of restorative work...

    By all means do a series of checks for alignment and wear first to determine if there is enough wear to justify any scraping.

    I'm thinking you'd want to run the usual leveling and "two collar" alignment checks and any tuning to eliminate any bed twist that might be present due to how it is sitting on the floor. Part of that is that you can also check the tail stock for any off center and sag of the ram. For a new machine I'd say the two collar procedure to eliminate twist would be easily also the final setting. But for an older lathe I can see the advantage of first leveling the ends of the bed with a precision machinist's level and then checking with the level in a few ways for an initial test for wear on the ways.

    Another good option for checking for wear is a tested straight edge and shims. The straight edge is best if it's truly straight but even if there is an arch to it if you can confirm the amount with a surface plate or by other means (measure width over the length then test for height flipped each way) you can include this fudge factor in the tests done to the bed.

    It might well be that there's some but not enough wear to justify a full scraping job. Especially when it's just a hobby as you say. The nice thing about these tests is that much can be done with a dial or test gauge and a few good ways of holding the gauge.

    Leave a comment:


  • davidwdyer
    replied
    There is a guy here who has offered to scrape it completely: the bed, cross slide, etc. work on the lead screws and make all new for $2,500.

    Right now I'm just waiting to see how it all works. It is just a hobby for me and I've honestly never used a lathe this big. It may be that

    I don't need the ultimate precision for the moment. Right now it seems as if have about $1500 in it.

    You are welcome to weigh in on this decision.
    Last edited by davidwdyer; 05-04-2022, 03:37 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • davidwdyer
    replied
    This meant that to obtain reverse, I installed an electric switch.

    Then I just cut off the long bar which controlled forward and reverse.

    You can see that the original lathe has three long bars across the front (actually, one lead screw and two bars) while now it has two.


    So far, this seems to be a good solution.
    Attached Files
    Last edited by davidwdyer; 05-04-2022, 04:02 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • davidwdyer
    replied
    This lathe is from 1948. It was made so the motor only ran in one direction.

    Reversing was done mechanically inside the main gearbox.

    But it seems that at one time the clutch mechanism which switched from forward to reverse gave out.

    With the old lathe, parts were probably a problem.

    So some unhappy human being took a welding rod and "solved" the problem.
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X