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  • #16
    My very first job between high school and college was for a motor and pump shop. The owner learned from his father and uncle. At some point the uncle came up with a funny shaming method for making stupid mistakes into a learning lesson. He had a full sized stuffed crow with a large clamp that it stood on. If someone did something stupid they got to "Eat Crow" and the crow was clamped to their work station. At the end of the month the shop closed at noon on the last Friday and everyone went to a local tavern and steak house for lunch. The person who had the crow paid the tab for everybody. There were normally about 6 including the owner. Some months it would have been cheaper to pay for the mistake. I can attest that it made you learn from your mistakes!!! That crow is still in the shop and still moves around from time to time. The last time I was there it was living on the owners desk lamp. I did not have the balls to ask or laugh........
    Robin

    Happily working on my second million Gave up on the first

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    • #17
      Somewhere on the internet,
      and damn if I can not find it again,
      is a picture of a Lagun brand mill
      with about a 1000 holes in the table.
      I mean, this table was Swiss cheese.
      Zero fukcs given in the most absolute
      way. I think it was on PM, but I can't
      find it there or anywhere.

      --Doozer
      DZER

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      • #18
        I have a Hendey shaper vise from 1908
        as far as I can tell, and there are just
        4 or 5 very minor and not very deep
        drill point pecks in it. Almost so small
        you would not see them if you did not
        look close.
        It does amaze me that this vise has lasted
        100+ years with no bozo marks. I know it
        was a shaper vise, but you know how things
        go, especially in the time frame of over a
        century. Inevitably someone has had the
        vise on a drill press or mill at some time.
        and virtually no oh sh|t damage.
        I hold dear tools like that, where people
        actually cared for them, and for such a
        long time, they survived. Just awesome.

        --Doozer
        DZER

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        • #19
          Originally posted by J.Ramsey View Post

          How about this one.

          That one looks like swiss cheese. It kind of gives you an indication of the quality of work they user did.

          JL...................

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          • #20
            Ironically the jaws on that don't look too bad. At least the vise stop looks salvageable lol.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
              That one looks like swiss cheese. It kind of gives you an indication of the quality of work they user did.

              JL...................
              This is always my first thought too when I see this type damage. Hey I know accidents do happen but this isn't an accident it's their standard mode of operation.

              It's no different in other trades either, I've seen "mechanics" that do consistently shoddy work, some that have left out critical brake and suspension fasteners that have led to accidents, yet they still draw a wage from the trade.

              I'm sure we can each all come up with anecdotal evidence from other trades as well.
              Doctors, lawyers, and indian chiefs are in the same boat as far as I can see as well, often times their incompetence while perhaps more subtle at first glance is often more painful in the long run.

              This is why we all really appreciate those with a good work ethic while taking pride in what they do.
              Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
              Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

              Location: British Columbia

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Willy View Post
                ....Doctors, lawyers, and indian chiefs are in the same boat as far as I can see as well, often times their incompetence while perhaps more subtle at first glance is often more painful in the long run.
                ....
                I can see doctors and lawyers being incompliant.
                But how many indian chiefs do you know who are
                slacking off on the job ? I mean, from watching
                Saturday morning cartoons, I really thought that
                quick sand was going to be a bigger problem in
                life than it actually turned out to be.

                ----Doozer
                DZER

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                • #23
                  Not brutality, more likely poor programming of a CNC.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by old mart View Post
                    Not brutality, more likely poor programming of a CNC.
                    Perhaps put the vise on backwards to what the program expected? Body where the part should be.
                    4357 2773 5647 3671 3645 0087 1276

                    CNC machines only go through the motions

                    "There's no pleasing these serpents"......Lewis Carroll

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by old mart View Post
                      Not brutality, more likely poor programming of a CNC.
                      Dunno. One definition is "great cruelty." I think that was pretty cruel to the poor vise.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Willy View Post

                        This is always my first thought too when I see this type damage. Hey I know accidents do happen but this isn't an accident it's their standard mode of operation.

                        It's no different in other trades either, I've seen "mechanics" that do consistently shoddy work, some that have left out critical brake and suspension fasteners that have led to accidents, yet they still draw a wage from the trade.

                        I'm sure we can each all come up with anecdotal evidence from other trades as well.
                        Doctors, lawyers, and indian chiefs are in the same boat as far as I can see as well, often times their incompetence while perhaps more subtle at first glance is often more painful in the long run.

                        This is why we all really appreciate those with a good work ethic while taking pride in what they do.
                        Here's my original BP vise..................I've owned this machine since the late 80's ?? The previous owner was also very meticulous.

                        I've ground the jaws once because the back one was slightly bowed on the face. Must have moved over time. I had to grind the convex side first without locking it down on the chuck then flipped it over and did the other side and then the tops edges.

                        Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG-20220505-185905.jpg Views:	0 Size:	245.8 KB ID:	1999636

                        Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG-20220505-185932.jpg Views:	0 Size:	246.8 KB ID:	1999637

                        JL...................
                        Last edited by JoeLee; 05-05-2022, 10:15 PM.

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                        • #27
                          Click image for larger version

Name:	Kurt vise 20211001_084659.jpg
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ID:	1999657
                          I made a mistake, so I accented it.
                          There is nothing noble in being superior to your fellow man; true nobility is being superior to your former self. -Ernest Hemingway
                          The man who makes no mistakes does not usually make anything.-- Edward John Phelps

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Doozer View Post
                            I really thought that
                            quick sand was going to be a bigger problem in
                            life than it actually turned out to be.
                            Same here.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by JoeLee View Post

                              I've ground the jaws once because the back one was slightly bowed on the face. Must have moved over time. I had to grind the convex side first without locking it down on the chuck then flipped it over and did the other side and then the tops edges.

                              JL...................
                              Yeah, grinding the jaws nice. But you have to make them true to the mill right?

                              Thats all you did, true the precision ground jaws to your setup Aint that a bich. JR

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by JRouche View Post

                                Yeah, grinding the jaws nice. But you have to make them true to the mill right?

                                Thats all you did, true the precision ground jaws to your setup Aint that a bich. JR
                                Yes, they were true to begin with other than the fixed jaw had a slight outward bow to it. When I tightened down on it I could see the oil and air bubbles come up from between the jaw and the vise. Other than that they were true on all other surfaces. The vise itself is also true. I can indicate across the top of the jaws moving the table and get less than .0002 deviation.

                                JL..............

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