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OT: motor rewinding supplier in USA, sell to hobbyist?

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  • OT: motor rewinding supplier in USA, sell to hobbyist?

    I have a swedish arboga 2508 geared head drill press with a built in 220 3phase 2 speed dahlander wound electric motor that is fried.
    I am retired. I have always been interested in trying my hand at rewinding an electric motor. Repairing this drill press would be a worthwhile project.
    My question is, do any of you know of a motor rewinding supply house in the USA, that will sell small quantities of needed supplies, a small minium order? Thanks


  • #2
    Have you tried a local rewind shop, often they will sell you a part reel of wire etc, the other material you need is pressphan paper.

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    • #3
      What you can't buy is the skill needed to do the rewinding and what you have chosen is a very difficult motor. Take it to a motor shop and pay to have it done right.
      Retired - Journeyman Refrigeration Pipefitter - Master Electrician

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      • #4
         
        DZER

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        • #5
          They are editing out the part where a professional comes in and does the winding for her!!
          Retired - Journeyman Refrigeration Pipefitter - Master Electrician

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          • #6
            Agreed there was a lot missing there, but nonetheless, I was impressed with her ability. I hope she had more protection than shown during the sand blasting operation. I caught myself holding my breath a few times
            “I know lots of people who are educated far beyond their intelligence”

            Lewis Grizzard

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            • #7
              I converted a Swedish Modig Radial Drill to a 2.5 hp DC treadmill motor and no regrets and it was free! Click image for larger version

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              • #8
                I don't know about where in the USA you are located, but you might try seeing if the place linked below has a location near you.

                https://www.eis-inc.com/

                I used to do a lot of business with this company when I ran a small transformer company and I know that the local distribution center would do smaller quantity orders for individuals on a credit card. The sell everything you will likely need for rewinding motors. It's been quite a few years since I have dealt with them so I don't know if this is still true, but it may be worth a phone call.

                I have seen mention of this place as well somewhere but have never tried dealing with them:

                https://www.totalwinding.com/aboutus/

                Beyond that, the local rewind shops as have already been mentioned are probably your best next shot.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by wmgeorge View Post
                  What you can't buy is the skill needed to do the rewinding and what you have chosen is a very difficult motor. Take it to a motor shop and pay to have it done right.
                  They won;t do it. More expensive than replacing the motor new.

                  If you count up, measure, take notes and pics, etc, and put it all back the same as it was with new materials (all the rewinding shop would do), then it will work as well as a chinese motor. You won't be able to do the varnish dip and bake to set the varnish (the good stuff is heat-cured), so it won't be top quality. It will be close if you tie the windings, and find a compatible drying varnish.


                  CNC machines only go through the motions

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                  • #10
                    The above information is very right. If you are a first time DIY person I would discourage you trying to do this with this motor. While it is not 100% true it is very close... This is a one shot operation. What I mean is that if you remove the damaged windings you will have almost 0% chance of finding a rewind shop to take over if you fail. It may be obvious, but wire size, number of windings, coil size and dimensions are only the starting point. When I learned this trade the shop I learned in was an old and trusted operation. While learning I rewound some of the same motors several times because I screw it up in one way or another, mostly by nicking the insulation on the wire while laying it into the slots and packing it. I was very fortunate. The owner of the shop ate my failures so I could learn from my mistakes. If you do want to try, find a local motor shop that does in-house rewinding and ask them about the needed materials. If you find one that will help you might also want to ask them if they would bake the varnish when you are finished. The windings are varnished in place to insulate and stop any vibrations of the actual winding wires which WILL lead to failure if not addressed. I have heard of varnish that does not require baking, but I think it is for minor repairs and not rewinds. The shop I learned at only used baked varnish. I can not remember the name of the material. I think it started with an "R"... not much help, Sorry.....

                    Just another piece of information.... The following is NOT a required step in a rewind. It is just an oddity of the shop I learned at. The shop I mentioned also had a vacuum chamber that was about 3 feet in diameter and 3 feet tall with the dome top removed. When we varnished a motor we would use a container sized to allow the rewind to be submerged in varnish and then the chamber was drawn into a hard vacuum. This was done three times. It was explained to me that while it was very odd to see this done in a small shop it was the only way to actually get the varnish to completely saturate the windings. The owner was VERY proud to claim that the shop had not had a winding failure caused by a poor rewind since his father and uncle began the vacuum varnish procedure in the late 30's. I do not know how much it helped, but that was the way that shop did it until they stopped doing rewinds about 2010. Our throwaway society has made rewinding motors a loosing trade, unfortunately....
                    Last edited by rdfeil; 05-05-2022, 05:14 PM. Reason: Added more information
                    Robin

                    Happily working on my second million Gave up on the first

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by rdfeil View Post
                      The above information is very right. If you are a first time DIY person I would discourage you trying to do this with this motor. While it is not 100% true it is very close... This is a one shot operation. What I mean is that if you remove the damaged windings you will have almost 0% chance of finding a rewind shop to take over if you fail. It may be obvious, but wire size, number of windings, coil size and dimensions are only the starting point. When I learned this trade the shop I learned in was an old and trusted operation. While learning I rewound some of the same motors several times because I screw it up in one way or another, mostly by nicking the insulation on the wire while laying it into the slots and packing it. I was very fortunate. The owner of the shop ate my failures so I could learn from my mistakes. If you do want to try, find a local motor shop that does in-house rewinding and ask them about the needed materials. If you find one that will help you might also want to ask them if they would bake the varnish when you are finished. The windings are varnished in place to insulate and stop any vibrations of the actual winding wires which WILL lead to failure if not addressed. I have heard of varnish that does not require baking, but I think it is for minor repairs and not rewinds. The shop I learned at only used baked varnish. I can not remember the name of the material. I think it started with an "R"... not much help, Sorry.....

                      Just another piece of information.... The following is NOT a required step in a rewind. It is just an oddity of the shop I learned at. The shop I mentioned also had a vacuum chamber that was about 3 feet in diameter and 3 feet tall with the dome top removed. When we varnished a motor we would use a container sized to allow the rewind to be submerged in varnish and then the chamber was drawn into a hard vacuum. This was done three times. It was explained to me that while it was very odd to see this done in a small shop it was the only way to actually get the varnish to completely saturate the windings. The owner was VERY proud to claim that the shop had not had a winding failure caused by a poor rewind since his father and uncle began the vacuum varnish procedure in the late 30's. I do not know how much it helped, but that was the way that shop did it until they stopped doing rewinds about 2010. Our throwaway society has made rewinding motors a loosing trade, unfortunately....
                      This is a very good post from somebody who actually did it. The vacuum-pressure impregnation (this is how the motor manufacturers call it) is a process to insure the varnish goes deep inside the windings. It acts as a glue to hold wires and steel laminations together. It is very important especially in highly loaded motors. Regular varnishing does not achieve full penetration. Vacuum-pressure impregnation is an expensive process and I believe only some motors are getting it. In 2004 I had a privilege to visit the Leroy Somer motor factory in France and saw the process in operation. At the time Leroy Somer was supplying 250 HP hermetic motors for our compressors and showed us the process to explain why their motors are so good. We had tested American made AOSmith and Reliance motors, but they could not compete with Leroy Somer in quality.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by alanganes View Post
                        I don't know about where in the USA you are located, but you might try seeing if the place linked below has a location near you.

                        https://www.eis-inc.com/

                        I used to do a lot of business with this company when I ran a small transformer company and I know that the local distribution center would do smaller quantity orders for individuals on a credit card. The sell everything you will likely need for rewinding motors. It's been quite a few years since I have dealt with them so I don't know if this is still true, but it may be worth a phone call.
                        +1 for EIS, I have bought magnet wire, fish paper and varnish from them in the past.I just had to sign up for the usual account information(name,addy,ph etc)
                        I just need one more tool,just one!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by wmgeorge View Post
                          They are editing out the part where a professional comes in and does the winding for her!!
                          It clearly showed her doing the windings on the mandrel.
                          Sorry Charlie.

                          -D
                          DZER

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            You certainly can rewind a motor yourself, not saying you should, it’s easier to drop it in the motor shop and pay up, I’ve seen a motor rewound on site by an electrician, he came out from the rewind company and did the job on site, it was a small 2 or 3 hp job, and as it was a funny one and urgent I got done with caveats, that it was to be sent in for a proper rewind asap as it really needed varnishing ( apparently it gets dipped in a tank, possibly vacuum I don’t know) and baking out after, I don’t know about this but every time I went to the shop it stunk of lacquer.
                            the motor worked but in keeping with their predictions, ran hot but it did work, talking to the guy the dipping and cooking was the fundamental difference it was insulation tested at 1000 volts and passed, what was actually done on site was the same as what he would have done in the shop, the coils were hand wound
                            on a thing like the Chinese girl used, the tools actually were the same ( thing for pushing the coils in) I’d suspect the girl in the video worked in a rewind shop myself.
                            getting supplies would be the hardest, I’d approach a motor shop and ask if they would supply you with enamelled copper wire in a small quantity and insulating film, varnish and just level with them you want to learn how as an exercise not to start a business! ( age is a giveaway!) I’ve found companies very helpful on average, I have wanted to have a go also, though I did help once, did learn some lacing tips, how to knot
                            I must admit I was quite impressed with the young Chinese girl, I very rarely smile as much, my face hurts, and I swear a fair bit but how the hell she worked with those massive gloves escapes me
                            mark
                            Last edited by boslab; 05-05-2022, 09:03 PM.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

                              They won;t do it. More expensive than replacing the motor new.

                              If you count up, measure, take notes and pics, etc, and put it all back the same as it was with new materials (all the rewinding shop would do), then it will work as well as a chinese motor. You won't be able to do the varnish dip and bake to set the varnish (the good stuff is heat-cured), so it won't be top quality. It will be close if you tie the windings, and find a compatible drying varnish.

                              These motors are integrated into the drill and are not an easy replacement job, they are more often rewound here if the motor is ruined than trying to rebuild it to fit a new one. If shops here can rewind these motors I don't see why US companies would scoff.

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