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  • We have a problem......................

    I just noticed the apron on my advance lathe has an ear broke off of the apron. The one that holds up the north end. So my problem is I need to remove the bed of the lathe to be able to weld it. If I block up the apron and take out the bolts will the apron be sitting sturdy or is there nothing else holding it there. From the looks of it it has been welded before but I dont think they removed the bed just done a halfway job of it. Dont know but might be depending on JB Weld before I am done. Ha. Not sure how good of cast that is.Didnt want to mark it up just to find out . Finding a new one or even a different one is not a possibility.

  • #2
    "Remove the bed"? Or "remove from the bed"?

    The apron should be removable by disconnecting from the carriage, and remove-ing off the right (tailstock) end after taking off the brackets so that the apron comes clear of the various shafts and leadscrew.

    Removing the shafts and leadscrew first makes it much easier.
    CNC machines only go through the motions

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    • #3
      I think one problem we have might be terminology. Sounds like you're calling the saddle "bed."
      The carriage is that complete assembly that slides up and down the ways of the bed, from tailstock end to headstock end. It (carriage) consists of the saddle (the part up on top that slides) and the apron (the vertical , front face of the carriage that's bolted to the saddle, thereby making up the carriage. To speak of removing the bed doesn't make sense.

      It sounds like you're describing a break on the front forward end of the saddle.
      I'm not familiar with your lathe, but normally when the apron and saddle are to be separated the apron does need careful blocking and supporting to avoid bending the lead screw and feed rod (if so equipped.)
      Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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      • #4
        Ok. I guess I am removing the saddle from the apron.. The apron has a broken ear. But I need to get the saddle out of the way so I can weld the apron. But will the apron set on a block without falling on the floor. Not sure how it is all put together.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
          "Remove the bed"? Or "remove from the bed"?

          The apron should be removable by disconnecting from the carriage, and remove-ing off the right (tailstock) end after taking off the brackets so that the apron comes clear of the various shafts and leadscrew.

          Removing the shafts and leadscrew first makes it much easier.
          Not sure why you would have to remove the TS and try to slide the saddle of the end of the bed when you can remove the 4 plates on the underside of the saddle and lift it straight off, after the apron is separated and blocked up.

          JL.............

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          • #6
            I may not have to lift the saddle off. If I block the apron then just unbolt the saddle and move it forward to clear the broken ear. That might work.Thanks guys if for nothing more than the schooling on terminology. Maybe next time I wont sound so dumb. Ha

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            • #7
              May I suggest you remove the apron if you are going to do a weld repair on it. First reason is dressing the weld will certainly require some work which will be easier if the apron is off the machine. . Secondly doing a weld repair with it on the machine even if the saddle is removed is generally not a good idea.

              But if you insist then place 2x4's or any sort of blocking under the apron to support it. Then cover the bed ways and protect the apron as best you can in the non welding area and have the ground close to the weld area. Make sure the current path doesn't go through bearings or bushings.

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              • #8
                Here is a link that shows all of the parts and terms:
                http://www.lathes.co.uk/latheparts/
                Location: North Central Texas

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                • #9
                  Thanks Joel

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
                    Not sure why you would have to remove the TS and try to slide the saddle of the end of the bed when you can remove the 4 plates on the underside of the saddle and lift it straight off, after the apron is separated and blocked up.

                    JL.............
                    Refer to nc5a's post. I agree. Best to get the apron, which is what you want to work on, off the machine and out where you can work on it. off the end, or lift it off after pulling the shafts and screw.

                    Every time I try to save a little work by not removing something completely, I end up having to anyhow, just when I don't particularly want to. May as well eliminate the middleman and just get it out to work on. Trying to do it "the easy way", is generally harder, and always half-assed.

                    If it turns out to be more than expected, then disassembling will be easier. Might want to do a bit of machining on it when the welding is done, also... that will be easier. And you can tuurn it any way you need to. Just better all around, IMO.
                    CNC machines only go through the motions

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                    • #11
                      There is nothing wrong with sounding dumb, I know many people that do not sound dumb that have the brainpower of an average king Edward potato
                      ( my old doctor for one, his secretory for 2 and his “vlad the impaler” phlebotomy tech for 3, that’s just one office) but they knew how to talk a good game
                      i hope you get it fixed, you don’t want a bend in your leadscrew trust me it a bugger to straighten even with a press and all the best intentions, I had a leadscrew to unbend once, I swear it took 2 days it’s not that hard to pull them out, like all things once you do it once, it becomes old fast
                      im more interested in how it broke tbh.
                      hope it works out ok
                      mark

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                      • #12
                        When I got my trusty sb10 I slid the carriage off the end. And a long end it was for me, a whole 48".

                        I was refurbishing something I had no knowledge of. I knew the carriage was going to have to come off. So I did. Sliding it off the end was the best move for me. Clean rails please. JR

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

                          Refer to nc5a's post. I agree. Best to get the apron, which is what you want to work on, off the machine and out where you can work on it. off the end, or lift it off after pulling the shafts and screw.

                          Every time I try to save a little work by not removing something completely, I end up having to anyhow, just when I don't particularly want to. May as well eliminate the middleman and just get it out to work on. Trying to do it "the easy way", is generally harder, and always half-assed.

                          If it turns out to be more than expected, then disassembling will be easier. Might want to do a bit of machining on it when the welding is done, also... that will be easier. And you can tuurn it any way you need to. Just better all around, IMO.
                          When I had to pull the apron and saddle off my Clausing I slid the lead screw out. It was a lot easier to remove it than to let it hang off the gear box and try to block it up. Logically thinking it was just the easier way to do it.

                          JL...............

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                          • #14
                            Some pictures would be helpful, I have just checked out the lathes UK and cannot see any lugs or how the aprons are attached to the saddle (carriage).

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                            • #15
                              I just figured it would be easier to leave it in place and weld it as I do weld in all positions. If I cant weld it maybe I can bolt an angle iron on the end and use that for an ear. Will know more today.

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