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  • #16
    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
    Every time I try to save a little work by not removing something completely, I end up having to anyhow, just when I don't particularly want to. May as well eliminate the middleman and just get it out to work on. Trying to do it "the easy way", is generally harder, and always half-assed.
    "The lazy man works twice as hard." One of my favorites. Example: Toss something toward the trash can and miss. Now I have to walk over, bend down to pick it up. I just worked twice as hard than if I'd just moved closer in the first place.

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    • #17
      Drilling a twenty foot jump shot is VERY satisfying though….

      Back to the lathe. Some shafts/screws are better removed WITH the apron. In which case you need to block under the apron while detaching the saddle and moving it aside.

      Often lead screws are attached to the gear box with cleverly concealed taper pins or alternate booby traps.

      Every brand is different, you’ll just need to gently work through the process.

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      • #18
        If it were me, I would remove the apron from the lathe and completely disassemble it getting all the critical shafts gears etc.out of the way. You may have to make up some kind of jig to hold the broken part in the correct position for welding. As far as I know, because is a casting it should be preheated before welding.
        Larry - west coast of Canada

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