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Removing large amounts of material?

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  • #46
    Originally posted by Michael Edwards View Post


    Edit: NVM, OP said aluminum, disregard potato chip pic..
    ...

    I do not get the potatoe chip reference, where’s the sandwich to go with them?

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    • #47
      Originally posted by AZHTR View Post
      I do have a Bridgeport and rotary table. I like trying new ways to do things and have not tried trepanning. I will most likely experiment with both the trepan tool and the hole saw (Lennox 3). I don’t make a lot of this type of part, but when I do, my chip pan fills up awfully fast. I do use a fairly heavy boring bar and it works well, it’s just a lot of wasted material.

      I appreciate all of the helpful suggestions! As always, this forum is extremely helpful!
      With the Bridgeport and rotary table you have an easy way to make the part using a small diameter end mill so you don't turn the part into chips but....if you learn to trepan you have gained a skill too and some parts might be easier to trepan than to attach to the rotary table without damaging the middle of the part to be cut out. I like the idea of having a nice piece left to use for another project.

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      • #48
        At home I have the offline conversational software for a Trak lathe that I use at work.
        Wrote a program just now for dung and giggles.

        From 1 1/2" to 4" X 1.05" long, beginning at 4.06" puts a nice .030" x 45 deg. chamfer on the front.

        The first screenshot is the start point and turning parameters, DOC, feed rate, spindle speed and so on.

        The second screenshot is the tool path, the time estimate of 0:2:15 is a bit optimistic (-;

        Click image for larger version

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        Click image for larger version

Name:	boring toolpath.jpg
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ID:	2000434

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        • #49
          Don't make the mistake I did when trepanning. I had the cutter set for the diameter of the hole I was making, 6 inches I think it was. I had the piece clamped in place, but also had my hand on it- with lots of clearance from the cutter I thought. Thank goodness I had a slow speed set. As the cutter swung around it went across three of my fingers, taking a divot out of each one. I yanked my hand out of there so fast that it only cut across once. That took about a year to heal up, probably because of the cutting fluid I think.

          There might have been a reason my hand was there- I don't remember. I only did that once.
          I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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          • #50
            Originally posted by darryl View Post
            I had the piece clamped in place, but also had my hand on it-

            There might have been a reason my hand was there- I don't remember. I only did that once.
            Learn once, like from D or learn twice and up in the ER like me. Take your pick, I have done both. JR

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