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Show me your DIY base for your 4x6 bandsaw

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  • #16
    A buddy and I have the same 4x6 H/V saw and both of us want to do something better than the sheet metal leg base. I reinforced my base with wood some years ago but it's still a PITA and ears to move the saw.

    So we're going to weld up a couple of new bases. The specifics for features so far are:
    1. Wheels on the rear act as bump stops so when pushed against a wall the saw can still tilt up to vertical mode.
    2. New base will have shelves for small off cuts that can be used for further small items.
    3. Large slide in and slide out cookie sheet to catch saw swarf from horizontal use and to catch smaller parts instead of picking up off the floor
    4. A front castering wheel that is cammed down using an eccentric to permit the saw to be easily moved around without needing to lift it up a long way like the original base requires. Or we might go with four full swivel casters that cam down at both ends so the saw can be moved even more easily. The casters will be a size suitable to moving even with the scrap shelf loaded up. Single lever at front for lifting and lowering.
    5. Materials choice would be highly selectable. Just basic dimensions which can then be adapted to angle or square tubing so we, or others, can use whatever is on hand. Minimum would be 1 1/2 x 1/8 angle.
    If this sounds like something which interests you then standby. My buddy is hoping to get to this within the next month or two since his saw is almost falling onto the ground due to the failure and deformation of his junk base. Or cheerfully steal the idea above freely
    Chilliwack BC, Canada

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    • #17
      Click image for larger version

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ID:	2000418 Here’s mine. Simple angle iron frame and casters. I decided to use the space for a short ends rack. The weight of the stored materials tend to lower the center of gravity.
      I cut it off twice; it's still too short
      Oregon, USA

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      • #18
        The base and storage worked so well for me, I did the same to my belt sander Click image for larger version

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        I cut it off twice; it's still too short
        Oregon, USA

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        • #19
          Originally posted by mattthemuppet View Post
          I added a bunch of 2x4 bracing to mine, mostly to raise it up but it also stiffened up the base nicely
          Click image for larger version

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          I've since changed the wheels out but don't have a recent picture of that.
          Boy, not as slick as the welded versions but it sure is the path of least resistance and I have a bunch of random 2x3 pieces sitting around. I'd put mine on 3 casters that I have.
          Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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          • #20
            Here’s mine on a modified harbor freight tool cart.
            You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 3 photos.
            When I get Time... I'll...

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            • #21
              In my workshop there's an outside corner. A workbench sits against the long wall there, and extends about 20 odd inches past the corner. In that extension there's a pivot point drilled. The bandsaw is mounted to a piece of plywood which also has a pivot point drilled into it. From this plywood piece, a leg comes down at an angle and pivots on the floor directly under the upper pivot point. I drilled into the concrete floor to allow the lower pivot point to exist.

              I just checked- there's also a stud of sorts between the overhang of the workbench and the floor, which is pretty much under the bandsaw to carry the weight of the saw. The original base was converted into a bench seat, and now I think it's gone. Those were pretty wimpy, as we all know.

              The saw can pivot about 140 degrees or so. This lets me align it with the bench to take advantage of the vise there, or swing it to be inline with the doorway into the room so I can handle a full 20 ft piece. It also lets me align the saw to one of the other benches for outboard support. At the same time, because there isn't much room in the shop, I can swing the saw out of the way to walk through the shop more easily.

              Because the plywood under the saw is pinned to the bench by the pivot bolt, there's no problem with the saw moving around when I'm using it in vertical mode. We have the identical 4x6 saw where I used to work, and it never stayed put- even with the locking castors on two corners. By the way, that had a simple plywood base under it, which definitely helped stiffen up the wimpy metal legs.
              I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Hawkeye View Post
                Here’s mine on a modified harbor freight tool cart.
                That's pretty nice, and brings it up to a civilized height to boot! I see that HF cart is $120 in a mess of colors, but there's one without the drawers for $60. So sad the 20% off coupons are history...

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                EDIT: This one has angle uprights rather than the tubular ones on darryl . Not so sturdy.
                Last edited by gellfex; 05-12-2022, 09:11 PM.
                Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by gellfex View Post

                  That's pretty nice, and brings it up to a civilized height to boot! I see that HF cart is $120 in a mess of colors, but there's one without the drawers for $60. So sad the 20% off coupons are history...

                  Click image for larger version

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                  EDIT: This one has angle uprights rather than the tubular ones on darryl . Not so sturdy.
                  That cart looks like it needs to be boxed in with sheet metal to have any strength.

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                  • #24
                    I'm sorry, but most of the photos of these 4X6 saws look more like they came from some hospital operating room rather than a Home Shop Machinist shop. Do you guys ever use them them, or do you just lick them clean each night before you go to bed? I use my saw at least 3 times a week and clean it after each use, and it still looks like a used machine. But it does not sparkle. What am I doing wrong?
                    _____________________________________________

                    I would rather have tools that I never use, than not have a tool I need.
                    Oregon Coast

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                    • #25
                      Lugnut, you mean like this ?
                      used almost everyday when in the shop
                      Notable improvements made over original purchase
                      1 . Custom Formed Aluminum Chip collector
                      2. Adjustable Bronze Rings for down feed control ( only one shown)
                      3. Made a 1"square tube frame and welded steel sheet to it. left unpainted so it absorbs any stray moisture in the shop
                      which I know works, as none of my tools have rusted since making the base
                      4. Handle ( Normally slide inside the base , but extended for view) slides in or out and when out and lifted, no caster wheels are needed - Also
                      when extended, it become a drying rack for wet shop towels
                      5. There is a shelf of plywood on the other side to hold spare blades ect... and having the shelf in the back, means not having to clean chips off the shelf
                      6. Built in linear measuring system with graduated markings
                      7 Steel storage as needed

                      Rich
                      Click image for larger version

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                      Green Bay, WI

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by lugnut View Post
                        I'm sorry, but most of the photos of these 4X6 saws look more like they came from some hospital operating room rather than a Home Shop Machinist shop. Do you guys ever use them them, or do you just lick them clean each night before you go to bed? I use my saw at least 3 times a week and clean it after each use, and it still looks like a used machine. But it does not sparkle. What am I doing wrong?
                        If filthy tools give you joy, this should make you ecstatic! The poor 4x6 lives right behind the 14" bandsaw and when I saw wood on that it gets covered in sawdust. There's also a bunch of shavings from power planing the corners off some PT 2x3 the other day. Was weird lumber, sharp corners like it was ripped from 1.5" planks!

                        Click image for larger version

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                        Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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                        • #27
                          I think I like clean machine pics more with a sprinkle of chips to prove they are being used!

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                          • #28
                            how about
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                            and
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                            gelfex - I really like the "wheels at one end, handle at the other" approach personally. Lift it up, scoot it out, drop it down and it's super stable. I'd be cautious about putting it on casters as the CoG changes pretty drastically from horizontal to vertical mode.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by RB211 View Post

                              That cart looks like it needs to be boxed in with sheet metal to have any strength.
                              Mine is sturdy enough, but could use a little bracing. I’ve thought about filling in the bottom area with cubbyholes to store short stock, that would stiffen it up a lot.

                              I think the cart I used is sturdier then the on Gellfex posted. But starting with the cheaper cart, and adding some bracing isn’t a bad option.
                              Last edited by Hawkeye; 05-13-2022, 07:01 AM.
                              When I get Time... I'll...

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by mattthemuppet View Post
                                how about
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                                and
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                                gelfex - I really like the "wheels at one end, handle at the other" approach personally. Lift it up, scoot it out, drop it down and it's super stable. I'd be cautious about putting it on casters as the CoG changes pretty drastically from horizontal to vertical mode.
                                The bicycles look like they haven't been ridden in a long time and if they're donated to someone, you would be left with some more space
                                Helder Ferreira
                                Setubal, Portugal

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