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Paint job gone bad

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  • Paint job gone bad

    I bought a 2012 tandem axel duel wheel gooseneck trailer last week. Very nice trailer, haven’t been used much. But I knew the tires was less than perfect, after all they put the cheapest 10 ply tires they can buy to get it off of the lot.
    I ordered up 4 new 14ply tires and had the other 4 new 14 ply tires on the rack, plus a couple of spares.
    I decided to paint the wheels while I had the tires off. I had some Benjamin Moore urethane oil paint had a hell of time getting it mixed up, it had separated pretty bad.
    when I got it mixed it looked all right and it brushed on fairly well.
    2 days later and its still not completely dry, looks terrible and you can scratch it off with fingernails.
    I tried to pressure wash it off with hot water washer, no dice.
    thinking about making a vat out of half of steel barrel and use some lye and hot water to remove the gummy paint.
    Any thoughts?? How much lye per gal of water?? I am sure if I heat the water and cook the wheels they should come out clean.

  • #2
    If all else fails then paint it with brake fluid , let set then wash it off

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    • #3
      I use lye all the time for removing paint & keep a few gallons of it around. But ... there are some paints that are very resistant/immune to removal with lye. E.g., epoxy & 2-part urethane is probably similar. So do a test first!

      My every-day concentration is a pound per gallon. A saturated solution, IIRC, is a pound per quart.

      Soap-making suppliers are good sources for lye.

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      • #4
        Bake the wheels at 200 to cure it. That'll outgass it and it'll harden up nicely.
        *Wait till wifey is gone for the day then in the oven they go.

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        • #5
          Was that something that needed a catalyzer? I had a similar experience with a finish I used once. It had two expiry dates- and even without the catalyst it was out of date. With the catalyst I was told to use it within a couple weeks. At first I did not add the proper amount of catalyst- that was my fault for either not measuring correctly, or getting the numbers wrong in my head. The finish wouldn't harden all the way. I added another coat with a lot more catalyst in it, and it did harden, but it took many days and a couple of stints out in the sun. I wonder if your urethane needed something like that?
          I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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          • #6
            I don’t know for sure what happened, I am guessing the paint was too old. Anyway it looks bad and the trailer is nice so it’s coming off somehow. I bought some new light grey spray cans yesterday. Going to try to get it off soon.

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            • #7
              If it hasn't actually set, it might be vulnerable to a solvent. I'd try MEK if you have it. Otherwise, the usual suspects: acetone, lacquer thinner, etc. Maybe gasoline.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by darryl View Post
                Was that something that needed a catalyzer? I had a similar experience with a finish I used once. It had two expiry dates- and even without the catalyst it was out of date. With the catalyst I was told to use it within a couple weeks. At first I did not add the proper amount of catalyst- that was my fault for either not measuring correctly, or getting the numbers wrong in my head. The finish wouldn't harden all the way. I added another coat with a lot more catalyst in it, and it did harden, but it took many days and a couple of stints out in the sun. I wonder if your urethane needed something like that?
                That was my first thought also, but I don't think that house paint stuff is air dry.
                Unlike older paints that will still dry some of these newer paints like the newer silicons have an expiration date and will no longer cure ore dry after so many years.

                Call the company an ask !

                JL............


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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Bob Engelhardt View Post
                  If it hasn't actually set, it might be vulnerable to a solvent. I'd try MEK if you have it. Otherwise, the usual suspects: acetone, lacquer thinner, etc. Maybe gasoline.
                  Buy a five gallon pale of lacquer thinner, get some gloves and rags and start having fun.

                  When the mess is cleaned up get some good automotive paint and do it right.

                  JL...............

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                  • #10
                    For some reason, I thought it was 2-part. But you didn't say that & "Benjamin Moore urethane oil paint" is not. In that case, lye will definitely work & soaking in lye is by far the easiest approach. Soak & rinse off ... done.

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                    • #11
                      Infra red lamp?
                      mark

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by true temper View Post
                        ...I had some Benjamin Moore urethane oil paint had a hell of time getting it mixed up, it had separated pretty bad...
                        2 days later...you can scratch it off with fingernails.
                        I tried to pressure wash it off with hot water washer, no dice.
                        thinking about making a vat out of half of steel barrel and use some lye and hot water to remove the gummy paint.
                        Any thoughts??....
                        Sounds like you just want to play with large science experiments.

                        Otherwise try a little bit, first, to check that your scheme will work.

                        12" x 35" Logan 2557V lathe
                        Index "Super 55" mill
                        18" Vectrax vertical bandsaw
                        7" x 10" Vectrax mitering bandsaw
                        24" State disc sander

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                        • #13
                          "Sand" blast them. I use crushed glass as a media. It will get all the rust and paint off in short order.
                          Peter
                          Grantham, New Hampshire

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by true temper View Post
                            urethane oil paint
                            I saw urethane and it reminded me of some wood protectant I have used. The stuff Never cures. Its only used in wood working when the item needs to be basically waterproof. Soak them in your favorite solution. Believe it or not but STP is very mild on yer skin and will eat the paint off if at a low simmer. You know, right next to the pot of beans Oil based. You will probably need a solvent. Lacquer thinner is your friend with this one. JR

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                            • #15
                              Lacquer thinner is zylene, toluene, and acetone- I think I got that right- as such it works on a great variety of substances. It's also relatively mind to handle. I used it quite a bit and never had a skin problem. Best used with ventilation, but it's not a choker. It's handy to have around.
                              I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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