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O/T: Computers are odd. Sometimes slow, some times fast?

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  • #16
    Can't you start the process before quitting time and let it proceed overnight? That's what I have done several times in the past when I had a long duration process.
    Paul A.
    SE Texas

    And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
    You will find that it has discrete steps.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by RB211 View Post
      Couple days ago I had to remove an expired solidworks installation. No uninstaller to be found, didn't show up in uninstall programs. Went with the heavy fisted caveman approach and just deleted the directories right off the disk. Except some of the files were write protected. Ended up having to go to a command prompt elevated to admin to remove everything.
      Yeah, you cant do that these days. With old windows you could go to the four main files (config.sys and such) and remove a program. These days the developers fragment their software to be stiffed in all over the place. If you are handy with editing your registry then its a piece of cake. I do not recommend doing that. JR

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
        Can't you start the process before quitting time and let it proceed overnight? That's what I have done several times in the past when I had a long duration process.
        Its not just a copy all type op. I have to manually select each folder, edit the contents a lil then transfer it over to a new hard drive. Its a hands on thing and the problem is each one only takes a couple minutes. I have hundreds of other folders that need to be moved the same way. I never turn the computer off so anytime I happen to be in the same room Ill move one over. If I could just select them all and move them it would be done. Its just tedious. I just thought it was odd. Its not like I havent done this before. I just never had to wait so long.. Almost thought I might have a virus but its clean. Just slow lol JR

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        • #19
          Originally posted by JRouche View Post

          Its not just a copy all type op. I have to manually select each folder, edit the contents a lil then transfer it over to a new hard drive. Its a hands on thing and the problem is each one only takes a couple minutes. I have hundreds of other folders that need to be moved the same way. I never turn the computer off so anytime I happen to be in the same room Ill move one over. If I could just select them all and move them it would be done. Its just tedious. I just thought it was odd. Its not like I havent done this before. I just never had to wait so long.. Almost thought I might have a virus but its clean. Just slow lol JR
          Windows is perfectly capable of having multiple folders selected at the same time, then dragging and dropping them where you want them to go. If this is NOT possible now, it's time to shut your machine down and reboot. Most Windows versions slowly "bloat" if the machine is kept on for long periods and need a "refresh" by rebooting. There is a program called "RESMON.EXE" that you can run to tell you your memory status. My guess is that it is almost entirely used up by the bloat. With the memory no longer available, your machine will have to use virtual memory on the hard disk, thus drastically slowing things down.

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          • #20
            Edit and transfer. I don't suppose you could separate those two things? Edit a bunch of files and then transfer them overnight.

            And how are you editing them? Could that be automated? In the past I used batch files (.bat) to automate file operations. They basically do things that can be performed with a DOS command line. But they have or had some ability for programming choices (conditional actions) in. You can still use the batch files if you open a DOS window. But I haven't used them for some time so things may have changed.

            https://www.google.com/search?client...tch+files+.bat

            Just some more thoughts.



            Originally posted by JRouche View Post

            Its not just a copy all type op. I have to manually select each folder, edit the contents a lil then transfer it over to a new hard drive. Its a hands on thing and the problem is each one only takes a couple minutes. I have hundreds of other folders that need to be moved the same way. I never turn the computer off so anytime I happen to be in the same room Ill move one over. If I could just select them all and move them it would be done. Its just tedious. I just thought it was odd. Its not like I havent done this before. I just never had to wait so long.. Almost thought I might have a virus but its clean. Just slow lol JR
            Paul A.
            SE Texas

            And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
            You will find that it has discrete steps.

            Comment


            • #21
              Oh, I would definitely recommend shutting your computer down, counting to ten, and restarting it on a regular basis; daily would be best.

              And do not use the Restart feature of Windows shutdown. Do a complete POWER OFF before restarting it. Something MUST remain ON with the Windows Restart. I an not fully knowledgeable on this, but have been cautioned about it by some pretty savvy computer pros.
              Paul A.
              SE Texas

              And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
              You will find that it has discrete steps.

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
                Oh, I would definitely recommend shutting your computer down, counting to ten, and restarting it on a regular basis; daily would be best.

                And do not use the Restart feature of Windows shutdown. Do a complete POWER OFF before restarting it. Something MUST remain ON with the Windows Restart. I an not fully knowledgeable on this, but have been cautioned about it by some pretty savvy computer pros.
                Good luck with that. Lots of computers are impossible to turn off. Seriously. You cannot do it, at least in any sensible way.

                Older laptops, sure, you could pull the battery pack and no more power. Current ones? Nope, there IS no battery pack that is separable from outside the case. The only way to turn it positively all the way off involves opening the case and yanking the battery connector. Yah.... we're all gonna do that...... NOT.

                However, you can do a "restart", which does reload everything. That's the point of it, dumping and reloading everything that is running, so that newly downloaded and installed versions are used. Bios, kernel, everything is reloaded or started from scratch.

                The windows restart may have a bit set somewhere, but unless it completely reloads everything, it could not be used in updating system software, since it would always have something held back that could not be changed.
                4357 2773 5647 3671 3645 0087 1276

                CNC machines only go through the motions

                "There's no pleasing these serpents"......Lewis Carroll

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

                  Good luck with that. Lots of computers are impossible to turn off.
                  Hey, as long as computers need power from the wall and are not hard-wired, if they won't power down on my command, then I will simply pull the power cord. I haven't yet seen a computer that wouldn't turn off with a plug pull.

                  Pushing the power button for 10 seconds used to be a reliable "turn-off" method, too.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by SLK001 View Post

                    Hey, as long as computers need power from the wall and are not hard-wired, if they won't power down on my command, then I will simply pull the power cord. I haven't yet seen a computer that wouldn't turn off with a plug pull.

                    Pushing the power button for 10 seconds used to be a reliable "turn-off" method, too.
                    I am surprised to find that you have never yet seen a laptop computer.

                    However, in order for you to understand the issue, you need to know that they are just like a regular computer, but smaller, with a built-in screen and keyboard, and powered by batteries so that you can use them where there is no power outlet. Most these days have the batteries internal, and difficult to access, although older ones had removable battery packs.

                    Obviously, with internal batteries, you have no way of removing all power positively. You would have to disassemble the machine, and disconnect the internal battery.
                    4357 2773 5647 3671 3645 0087 1276

                    CNC machines only go through the motions

                    "There's no pleasing these serpents"......Lewis Carroll

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      I miss devices not having a removable battery, conspiracy theories abound with that.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

                        I am surprised to find that you have never yet seen a laptop computer.
                        Yeah... Thanks for the edjumacation. All my laptops have batteries that pop off with a flick of a clip. It's amazing at how fast they die when they no longer have power. I know some apple products have non-accessible batteries, but I won't let an apple product in my house.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          It is certainly not just Apple.

                          That "power line reset" was very handy when something started that you did not want to have proceed, or if a change was made that you did not like.

                          When the only option is to push a shutdown button, the OS will save the current state, AFTER finishing most things that are already started. So the capability to stop processes by removing power is gone, never to return.

                          But, you do not own your computer, nor do you own the data or whatever you create with it any longer. You only think you do.
                          4357 2773 5647 3671 3645 0087 1276

                          CNC machines only go through the motions

                          "There's no pleasing these serpents"......Lewis Carroll

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by SLK001 View Post

                            Yeah... Thanks for the edjumacation. All my laptops have batteries that pop off with a flick of a clip. It's amazing at how fast they die when they no longer have power. I know some apple products have non-accessible batteries, but I won't let an apple product in my house.
                            My MSI laptop has a built in 99WH battery

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