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Gotteswinter's Method

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Jammer Six View Post
    That was interesting.

    So tell me this: is tearing chucks apart and re-building them part of being a machinist?
    As the other two above said it sure is.

    For me that's about every 3 years since it's just one of about 5 other hobbies. If I were doing machining for a living I think I'd be cleaning the chuck out about every 3 to 4 months.... or after about 4 heavy duty boring jobs that seem to feed the swarf straight to the scroll.....
    Chilliwack BC, Canada

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    • #17
      I did the bump Tru chuck thing on my previous lathe and found it to be quite a pain in the backside. A man or steak would knock it out and then I'd have to spend an age knocking out around with a rubber mallet trying to dial it in. Nothing like dialing it in with 4 screws at all.

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      • #18
        Buck Ajust-Tru Chuck is the name brand I grew up with. Advantage over what's shown in the video is the Buck is moved, and held in position with set screws. Easier to adjust, and less likely to get accidentally knocked out of place.

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        • #19
          It's actually a quite common practice for those that don't have a set true chuck.
          I do it occasionally with the three jaw on my tool and cutter grinder.

          JL......

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          • #20
            I have the same type of lathe Chinese from Spain and the chuck registers on a slight cone. I also have a Tripan quick change toolpost he has. The Swiss made tool holders cost more than the lathe is worth
            Helder Ferreira
            Setubal, Portugal

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            • #21
              Been using this method for two years now.

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              • #22
                All but one of the three jaw scroll ckucks at the museum have loose registers between the chuck and backplate. They also have 6 bolts/ SHCS holding the parts together, and none have ever been knocked out of place. The exception is the largest, a 6 3/4" serrated jaw which is 95% used with soft jaws, and would be pointless modifying. They generally run about 0.002" tir, but can be dialled in to zero for those rare high accuracy jobs.
                The manufacturers make a huge profit selling the set tru style of chucks, and certainly don't want to advertise the free method.
                Last edited by old mart; 05-16-2022, 04:00 PM.

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