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  • Need information on this item

    While cleaning out my shop I came across this item I remember it was given to me by a old friend and machines who has long since past on but I can't remember what he told me it was used for I believe it has something to do with thread measuring but not sure how to use it can anyone help ?? ​ image widget Click image for larger version

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  • #2
    That is an old style thread mike. It would be set to a desired standard, or just used as a comparator to match an existing thread. The sets of anvils correlate to different size thread pitches. Ames was one of the better quality tool makers a long time ago. This tool would still be useful in these modern times.
    Last edited by Toolguy; 05-16-2022, 11:21 AM.
    Kansas City area

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    • #3
      I think you are on the right track. Looks to me like a 3 wire type of thread measuring devise. Not to sure how you would use it but possible the rectangular pieces are like gauge blocks for zeroing the tool and the adapters with 1 and 2 wires go on either end. At least that's my best guess.
      Larry - west coast of Canada

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      • #4
        The Scru-Meter.
        Bwwwaaahhh ! ! !

        -D
        DZER

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Cuttings View Post
          I think you are on the right track. Looks to me like a 3 wire type of thread measuring devise. Not to sure how you would use it but possible the rectangular pieces are like gauge blocks for zeroing the tool and the adapters with 1 and 2 wires go on either end. At least that's my best guess.
          That's what I was thinking so how do you use the gage block before the wires on a blank anvil ?

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          • #6
            The gage blocks may be for certain diameters of fastener. Do they have grooves on the ends? Some closeups of those might be helpful.
            Kansas City area

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Toolguy View Post
              The gage blocks may be for certain diameters of fastener. Do they have grooves on the ends? Some closeups of those might be helpful.
              As far as I can tell no there are no grooves on the gage blocks there are some numbers on them not sure if they are stamped in or printed on I have yet to try and clean them up

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              • #8
                The gauge blocks wouldn't need grooves if the manufacturer ground the tips of the anvils to provide flats at close tolerances. The flanks on the anvils would still seat on the thread being measured and the flats would never see any wear to speak of if they're not abused.
                .
                "People will occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of the time they will pick themselves up and carry on" : Winston Churchill

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by TGTool View Post
                  The gauge blocks wouldn't need grooves if the manufacturer ground the tips of the anvils to provide flats at close tolerances. The flanks on the anvils would still seat on the thread being measured and the flats would never see any wear to speak of if they're not abused.
                  I think you're exactly right. If you enlarge the images you can see that the wires do indeed have flat faces, and the blocks are labeled 7/16-14, 5/8-11 and 3/4-16, etc.

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                  • #10
                    The wire caps that snap on to the Angels do have numbers stamped into the sides ex. 14-11-16 I think they are for thread pitch but I am not sure how to set it up

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                    • #11
                      Correction it is supposed to read anvils not angels

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                      • #12
                        Again my best guess. If you use a bolt or something with a known thread and set it up in the tool with the correct wire caps, then zero the tool. You should then be able to use the corresponding gauge block to find out whether they are used with the wire caps on or off.
                        Larry - west coast of Canada

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                        • #13
                          Just wanted to thank you guys for the info it is a great help
                          I am still checking things out and I found that the manufacture is still in business and going to send them an e-mail to see if I can obtain some more wires and gage blocks
                          Once again thank you for your input

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                          • #14
                            From memory it has something to do with effective diameter, I read a page about them once but can’t remember the ins and outs, it mentioned a “fiducial indicator” to show excess or deficiencies but I’ve never handled one.
                            mark
                            an I in the right reality, the other one showed fat assed models in dresses in the ads, I did not like it

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by boslab View Post
                              mark
                              an I in the right reality, the other one showed fat assed models in dresses in the ads, I did not like it
                              I guess they were showing the excess condition...

                              Kansas City area

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