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My 6" 4 jaw seems to need a 9/32 hex key, anyone know where to get a T handle for it?

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  • BCRider
    replied
    Looks great! Will easily last for decades to come too!

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  • gellfex
    replied
    So I just sucked it up and made it using the technique true temper showed. It was that or start rebuilding a bunch of window screens this evening.

    I had both SS and carbon 3/8 hex stock, I used the carbon, broached the hole in 5/8" 6061 for the handle and pinned it in with a 3/32 roll pin. I think it will serve just fine! Thanks all.

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    Click image for larger version

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  • gellfex
    replied
    Originally posted by RB140 View Post
    Found a 9/32 hex key on line at safetytools.us/9-32-hex-Key/ it is a bit pricy
    You could cut it and weld a Handel on it to make a T Handel
    $55 for an L key!!!!!!!! I think we've found an new definition of 'chutzpah'. These guys must be selling to the govt.

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  • RB140
    replied
    Found a 9/32 hex key on line at safetytools.us/9-32-hex-Key/ it is a bit pricy
    You could cut it and weld a Handel on it to make a T Handel

    Leave a comment:


  • gellfex
    replied
    Originally posted by BCRider View Post
    Devil's advocate time? How loose is the 7mm in the recess? You posted that you've used the 7mm for a while now. Check the hex recess for signs of the edges of the hex key wedging in the opening and burring the metal mid way across the flats in the recess. If there's any sign of displacing metal other than some shiny spots you might want to consider what is going on. If it fits better than that suggests and there is nothing more than some shiny bits then great.
    Excellent point, but I don't see any moving metal in there. Old goods from when they knew how to case harden! I've only had this a few years, and barely use it. I honestly can't recall if the 7mm L key came with it or I pulled it out of my archives, probably the latter.

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  • BCRider
    replied
    Devil's advocate time? How loose is the 7mm in the recess? You posted that you've used the 7mm for a while now. Check the hex recess for signs of the edges of the hex key wedging in the opening and burring the metal mid way across the flats in the recess. If there's any sign of displacing metal other than some shiny spots you might want to consider what is going on. If it fits better than that suggests and there is nothing more than some shiny bits then great.

    Leave a comment:


  • gellfex
    replied
    Lots of great ideas, but the path of least resistance is the Amazon 7mm T handle. The 7mm L i'm using seems to work well enough. If the T fails, then I guess I'll try one of these other solutions. Trust me, I've got enough projects that need my attention that I don't need another and the $10 is well spend! I suspect that, as I think BCRider commented, I should cut it down in length so I get less torquing.

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  • BCRider
    replied
    Originally posted by gellfex View Post

    Buying an indexer to make a chuck key is a bit of an extreme case of tail wagging the dog.
    Yep, that describes it neatly in a nutshell....

    You described the idea of using a hex bolt or nut as an impromptu indexing key. That's certainly an option. And a clever one!

    But for my money True Temper's idea of milling down a 5/16 key to size is the winner. The key itself provides the indexing. And the only item you need to buy is one of the cheap 1/4 or 6mm carbide end mills. Although in my case I'd also need to buy a 6mm R8 collet to hold it... But faced with a lot of the listings for mill tooling I see being metric I'm looking at a metric collet set anyway.

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  • reggie_obe
    replied
    Originally posted by gellfex View Post

    Buying an indexer to make a chuck key is a bit of an extreme case of tail wagging the dog.
    Buy a collet block set, much cheaper, but sacrificing a good quality hex key is cheaper still.

    Leave a comment:


  • gellfex
    replied
    Originally posted by flathead4 View Post

    "...so I guess I need to buy one."

    Every task is an opportunity to buy new tools.
    Buying an indexer to make a chuck key is a bit of an extreme case of tail wagging the dog.

    Leave a comment:


  • deltaenterprizes
    replied
    Buy a set of HF T handle Allen wrenches and break off the plastic T handle , drill a slightly under sized hole in a piece of appropriately sized mild steel stock and press the Allen hex into the mild steel stock!
    Aluminum will work also!

    Leave a comment:


  • wmgeorge
    replied
    Do you have a welder?

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  • flathead4
    replied
    Originally posted by gellfex View Post

    I don't have an indexer...
    "...so I guess I need to buy one."

    Every task is an opportunity to buy new tools.

    Leave a comment:


  • Doozer
    replied
    Originally posted by true temper View Post
    Click image for larger version Name:	DBE7845B-7234-49F1-BC68-3967702108F4.jpg Views:	0 Size:	3.54 MB ID:	2001045
    2 words.
    HeII yeah !

    --D

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by BCRider View Post

    It certainly wouldn't break. But 9/32 is not far off 1/4" and this IS for a lathe chuck key. That size of mild steel or annealed drill rod would easily twist out of shape in that sort of use given the typical length of the "T" handle on even a small chuck key. So I think at least a pre-hardened alloy that is still machineable would be needed. And frankly the cheap allen "L" shaped keys are just such a handy source of heat treated stock which has good known durability that I think in this case it's the better option just due to the small size.
    I've made several chuck keys in the 1/4" or 5./16" range. I did not harden any of them.

    Every one of them is working just fine, and is not even particularly worn. I clearly agree that the need for hardening is really not there for normal square end keys.

    Hex keys are a bit different, and hardening to some degree is helpful, because even the commercial ones are easy enough to strip.

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