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  • Engine Block Repair

    Not sure I could get behind a repair procedure that involves scraps and burning camel **** with diesel.

    Good to see an apprentice treated properly, though.

    "I am the Master. This is where I shall sit. Bring the engine block closer."

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mi_NSFq0r8I

  • #2
    That carbide reactor to make acetylene is pretty neat though.

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    • #3
      I thought it was brazing, but when it was being ground smooth it sure looked like steel or iron.
      Retired - Journeyman Refrigeration Pipefitter - Master Electrician

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      • #4
        My dad had one when I was a kid, carbide works was local and you could get it in tins for acetylene generators the acetylene was low pressure through a water trap but it worked, fill a screw top bottle with a bit of gravel then a handful of carbide, splash of water, shake and sling into the trout pond, boom, fish float up stunned scoop and “ retreat gracefully “
        mark

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        • #5
          Here in the frozen north acetylene generators could be very dangerous. If there was ice on the water inside the tank when you started a pile of carbide could pile up and then fall through the ice all at once, causing a sudden pressure spike which could blow the top off. Remember seeing in an old black smith shop a huge chunk blown out of a log rafter from just such an incident

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          • #6
            Originally posted by wmgeorge View Post
            I thought it was brazing, but when it was being ground smooth it sure looked like steel or iron.
            Probably was. I am pretty sure he gas welded it with iron or steel filler. Nice campfire preheat and post heat/slow cool too, heh.

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            • #7
              I'm just impressed they were all wearing shoes.
              It's all mind over matter.
              If you don't mind, it don't matter.

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              • #8
                Wasn't this posted a while back?
                Helder Ferreira
                Setubal, Portugal

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                • #9

                  I knew it
                  The trick is you need cowdung..:p https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mi_NSFq0r8I Gotta love how the store next door is cooking Naan .
                  Helder Ferreira
                  Setubal, Portugal

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                  • #10
                    I liked it, thanks. Its amazing what folks can do when survival is on the line, you know like food and water and money to get it. And the foot, bicycle and vehicle traffic are not even phased by the outdoor shop.. JR

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                    • #11
                      I wonder if there is anyplace in the US that would do such a repair, regardless of price. There was a lot of skill to do that. I also wonder what the filler rod material was?

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                      • #12
                        Filler rod seemed to be square, likely cast iron of some sort cast by one of the local foundries for just that purpose. If it is the vid I saw, the old guy doing the welding was dipping it in flux every so often.
                        4357 2773 5150 9120 9135 8645 1007 1190 2133 9120 5942

                        Keep eye on ball.
                        Hashim Khan

                        Everything not impossible is compulsory

                        "There's no pleasing these serpents"......Lewis Carroll

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                        • #13
                          Interesting video and it only goes to show the knowledge and skill that a shop like that can have.

                          Some things I noticed include what looked like home made charcoal and that drill press with the articulated arm. They easily moved the head to the hole location instead of moving the engine block. It seemed perfect for the work they were doing. Oh, and it had speeds low enough for tapping and it could reverse. I thought my 20" DP was a big one, but that one completely out-classes it.
                          Paul A.
                          SE Texas

                          And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                          You will find that it has discrete steps.

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                          • #14
                            Aww jeez... You guys are going to send me on another "how not to do things" paki video binge.

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                            • #15
                              Some of the clapped out crap the fix in those videos is pretty amazing. Here everything is just tossed.

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