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  • wierdscience
    replied
    Originally posted by Jammer Six View Post
    Not sure I could get behind a repair procedure that involves scraps and burning camel **** with diesel.

    Good to see an apprentice treated properly, though.

    "I am the Master. This is where I shall sit. Bring the engine block closer."

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mi_NSFq0r8I
    Charcoal, animal dung isn't hot enough Looks like a Perkins 4.203 or 4.236, or one of the Indian clones, probably saved some farmer's tractor from the scrapper.

    Ahh, I see now, later in the video the sh*t comes out
    Last edited by wierdscience; 05-28-2022, 04:15 AM.

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  • wierdscience
    replied
    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
    Filler rod seemed to be square, likely cast iron of some sort cast by one of the local foundries for just that purpose. If it is the vid I saw, the old guy doing the welding was dipping it in flux every so often.
    Maybe,maybe not, a commercial product, I've used it in the past to do CI repairs. Several mfgs still make it

    https://www.brazing.com/products/Wel...lloys/RCI.aspx

    Comes in 3/16 and 1/4 square rods. In use the whole casting is brought up to dull red heat and the rod is used with OA welding while hot. Once the weld is finished, it goes back in the oven/fire and allowed to cool over 12-24 hours.

    I haven't used CI filler rod in 10 years or better,it's only used anymore when appearance of the finished product is important. I have used the same method,but with steel filler where appearance isn't an issue. It takes time, but the repair is every bit as a sounds as the original casting and the HAZ is perfectly machinable.

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  • Tobias-B
    replied
    I remember the local mechanic 'lok-n-stitch' ing a bale stacker engine block back
    together after the farmer left water in it over the winter.

    That was kind of cool. No camel dung, though.

    I'm always impressed when others can fix castings- my experience isn't varied enough,
    and I usually end up having to make an ugly braze to get any results at all...
    ...or a river of nickel rod...
    ...or sometimes, just some pop- rivets!

    it IS impressive how much those little single- burner cookers can heat up something like
    a block, though, given a couple of welding blankets and enough time.

    t

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  • junkaddict
    replied
    Some of the clapped out crap the fix in those videos is pretty amazing. Here everything is just tossed.

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  • I make chips
    replied
    Aww jeez... You guys are going to send me on another "how not to do things" paki video binge.

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  • Paul Alciatore
    replied
    Interesting video and it only goes to show the knowledge and skill that a shop like that can have.

    Some things I noticed include what looked like home made charcoal and that drill press with the articulated arm. They easily moved the head to the hole location instead of moving the engine block. It seemed perfect for the work they were doing. Oh, and it had speeds low enough for tapping and it could reverse. I thought my 20" DP was a big one, but that one completely out-classes it.

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Filler rod seemed to be square, likely cast iron of some sort cast by one of the local foundries for just that purpose. If it is the vid I saw, the old guy doing the welding was dipping it in flux every so often.

    Leave a comment:


  • Sparky_NY
    replied
    I wonder if there is anyplace in the US that would do such a repair, regardless of price. There was a lot of skill to do that. I also wonder what the filler rod material was?

    Leave a comment:


  • JRouche
    replied
    I liked it, thanks. Its amazing what folks can do when survival is on the line, you know like food and water and money to get it. And the foot, bicycle and vehicle traffic are not even phased by the outdoor shop.. JR

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  • Noitoen
    replied

    I knew it
    The trick is you need cowdung..:p https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mi_NSFq0r8I Gotta love how the store next door is cooking Naan .

    Leave a comment:


  • Noitoen
    replied
    Wasn't this posted a while back?

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  • MrWhoopee
    replied
    I'm just impressed they were all wearing shoes.

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  • eKretz
    replied
    Originally posted by wmgeorge View Post
    I thought it was brazing, but when it was being ground smooth it sure looked like steel or iron.
    Probably was. I am pretty sure he gas welded it with iron or steel filler. Nice campfire preheat and post heat/slow cool too, heh.

    Leave a comment:


  • Captain K
    replied
    Here in the frozen north acetylene generators could be very dangerous. If there was ice on the water inside the tank when you started a pile of carbide could pile up and then fall through the ice all at once, causing a sudden pressure spike which could blow the top off. Remember seeing in an old black smith shop a huge chunk blown out of a log rafter from just such an incident

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  • boslab
    replied
    My dad had one when I was a kid, carbide works was local and you could get it in tins for acetylene generators the acetylene was low pressure through a water trap but it worked, fill a screw top bottle with a bit of gravel then a handful of carbide, splash of water, shake and sling into the trout pond, boom, fish float up stunned scoop and “ retreat gracefully “
    mark

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