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Carbide Insert Codes ?

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  • Carbide Insert Codes ?

    I use some carbide in my home garage shop and sort of figured out the ANSI code like WNMG 332W MF2 or the ISO code for a CNMG 120408 BG... which can be found on the web. However I can NO seem to find any information on how to read codes like CCMT 32.52. How are these codes read without going to some site like Carbide Depot to look them up - is there any chart, PDF, ....? I am guessing that the CCMT 32.52 is more ISO related, but I am not sure about that either.

  • #2
    Lots of info on the carbide depot site. Start here. http://www.carbidedepot.com/resources.aspx

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    • #3
      Go to the mfg.'s web site, they should have charts that tell what each letter / number designates.

      Example............ Al2O3 Finish, Neutral, 3/8″ Inscribed Circle, 1/32″ Corner Radius, 80° Diamond etc.

      It does get confusing but most mfg.s' have good tech support.

      JL...........

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Hit&MissTom View Post
        I use some carbide in my home garage shop and sort of figured out the ANSI code like WNMG 332W MF2 or the ISO code for a CNMG 120408 BG... which can be found on the web. However I can NO seem to find any information on how to read codes like CCMT 32.52. How are these codes read without going to some site like Carbide Depot to look them up - is there any chart, PDF, ....? I am guessing that the CCMT 32.52 is more ISO related, but I am not sure about that either.
        It's the same ANSI code. The 2.5 is probably throwing you.

        332

        3/8" IC
        3/16" thick
        2/64" nose radius

        32.52

        3/8" IC
        2.5/16" aka 5/32" thick
        2/64" nose radius.

        All the same.
        21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
        1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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        • #5
          In the end, it may not matter, you will know what it is, but may still not be able to find the part. Lots of specialty parts, made by one vendoe, and then they stop, obsoleting your tooling overnight.
          CNC machines only go through the motions

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          • #6
            Thanks for showing that the 32.52 is really 3 digits; 3, 2.5, and 2.
            And other posts.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
              In the end, it may not matter, you will know what it is, but may still not be able to find the part. Lots of specialty parts, made by one vendoe, and then they stop, obsoleting your tooling overnight.
              That's kind of an overstatement. Turning inserts are pretty universal. TNMG, CCMT, CNMG and most other inserts
              are the same from all manufacturers--biggest variations are in the alloy of the insert and the chipbreaker configuration.

              Inserts for milling, on the other hand, are often quite proprietary. There are some inserts--APKT for example--that are
              reasonably universal but many more are specific to only one maker...

              Keith
              __________________________
              Just one project too many--that's what finally got him...

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by LKeithR View Post

                That's kind of an overstatement. Turning inserts are pretty universal. ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,
                Perhaps. I did say "may not".... some are simple enough. Others, no.

                I still have never found a replacement insert for the expensive boring bar (solid carbide bar) I have. It is a somewhat normal insert, but a different unavailable thickness, and with some features that are not coded.

                I do not have the code, I have been trying to find it out, or derive it from the shape, size etc. Have never yet found the actual insert or a code for it.
                CNC machines only go through the motions

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Hit&MissTom View Post
                  Thanks for showing that the 32.52 is really 3 digits; 3, 2.5, and 2.
                  And other posts.
                  You're welcome. I had the same confusion when I started,on the exact same insert actually.

                  Another thing that confused me were flat inserts with no hole. No 4th letter for those since they were flat. Like CNG 643 I think was the code.
                  21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
                  1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Hit&MissTom View Post
                    I use some carbide in my home garage shop and sort of figured out the ANSI code like WNMG 332W MF2 or the ISO code for a CNMG 120408 BG... which can be found on the web. However I can NO seem to find any information on how to read codes like CCMT 32.52. How are these codes read without going to some site like Carbide Depot to look them up -is there any chart, PDF, ....? I am guessing that the CCMT 32.52 is more ISO related, but I am not sure about that either.
                    Both ANSI and ISO insert nomenclature in one small PDF.

                    https://www.casa.co.nz/Equipment/mac...menclature.pdf
                    Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                    Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                    Location: British Columbia

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Willy View Post

                      Both ANSI and ISO insert nomenclature in one small PDF.

                      https://www.casa.co.nz/Equipment/mac...menclature.pdf
                      Willy,

                      That's a very useful, at-a-glance, guide to inserts. Thanks for posting.

                      Ian.

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                      • #12
                        Thanks for that chart Willy.
                        I printed it as deciphering the nomenclature is like trying to translate 4 languages at the same time.

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                        • #13
                          I want to thank all for the great answers. The IC for ANSI converted to-or-from ISO got me really confused: As the ISO uses various edge measurements for different shapes. The other (not obvious to me then) was using codes like CNMN32.54 not realizing the 2.5 was the 2nd digit and reading it as 32.54 instead.
                          Last note - I too have a holder that illudes identification, but I did get an insert into it that fits good enough.

                          Again Thanks to all !!

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                          • #14
                            It's a great chart. Better than the one I have been using

                            too bad there is not a similar chart for who makes the various shape-size combos. Or, the manufacturer codes on the insert referenced to the actual name.

                            Maybe those exist, I have not seen them.
                            CNC machines only go through the motions

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Perhaps last post, but -- I found my Engineers Black Book, USA Edition, https://www.engineersblackbook.com/
                              It covers rather well some codes for turning and milling inserts. On page 131 I found a chart listing some more familiar shapes for ANSI crossing to ISO.

                              Just found this and thought I would add the information if anyone is interested. I have NO association with the book.

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