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OT: Any HAM's here?

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  • OT: Any HAM's here?

    I know this topic pops up once in a while, I just forget who is one here. Going to pick up an Icom 5100A tomorrow. Admittedly it's mostly going to be used for scanning railroad frequencies, but think it'll be fun to try out the digital modes.

  • #2
    Hi there, A Ham since 1989. Have operated Extra Class as KH0EX for 18 yrs, and as a Kiwi, operate under my ZL call, ZL1OG
    Last edited by OwenG; 06-01-2022, 09:35 PM.
    ZL1OG:KH0EX

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    • #3
      That looks like a nice little transceiver. I've been a ham for around 9 months, but only hold a TECH license. I want to set up a proper 'shack' in the spare room, but I've hit a major case of lazy compounded by too many projects to work on. So I still need to get 10 meter rig and associated antenna(s)

      Even so, I like to just monitor the airwaves with a small Yaesu FT5D. It does a nice job of scanning in several different modes. I have a LOT of repeaters in the local area.

      Dan
      At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

      Location: SF East Bay.

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      • #4
        I've been licensed since '79 or '80, I have held Novice, Tech, Tech Plus, General and Extra class licenses. It's a great hobby if you're at all technically minded. I started with vacuum tubes and Morse code, and have tried many different modes, including laser beams. I have been slowly regressing, and trying to get more QSO's via Morse code on the lower bands.

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        • #5
          I am general class, but never learned Morse.

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          • #6
            Morse is a stumbling block for a lot of us. I just can't get it. I can't even tell the difference between the dits and dahs half the time.

            There is an interesting "wordl" type game at https://morsle.fun/practice/word/ that you can use to learn to differentiate between the sounds while also memorizing some of the letters. I'd like to learn code just so that I can listen to some of the code only bands.

            Dan
            At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

            Location: SF East Bay.

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            • #7
              Seems to be quite a few. I am a Extra class Ham and commercial T2 license. Last 20 years I machined waveguides / devices for Aero Space. As a machinist most of my antennas, hardware and microphones are shop made. It's a great hobby.
              Click image for larger version  Name:	20210222_205139.jpg Views:	105 Size:	169.0 KB ID:	2002752
              Last edited by Fasturn; 06-01-2022, 03:45 PM.

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              • #8
                I hold callsign ZL2AYQ and I got my first call about 1973. However I had been using Morse on aeronautical point-to-point frequencies since my training in 1964.

                So I should know Morse but really I have never been any better than 'adequate' with most working being at 20 wpm. I have written a few little programs to help with Morse sending and receiving.

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                • #9
                  I've heard that those really good at morse do not hear dits and dahs, but words. I think that qualifies as a foreign language.

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                  • #10
                    AF8JC Amateur Extra here. I just purchased an Icom IC-9700 to sit next to my IC-7300 today. I have been teaching Technician classes for about 8 years.
                    JHC Dayton, OH

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by RB211 View Post
                      I've heard that those really good at morse do not hear dits and dahs, but words.
                      They certainly do and if the channel is busy with Morse and someone calls your callsign you will be alerted even if you are not actively listening or even talking to someone else in the office.

                      We used to take almost all copy to a (special) typewriter, the characters went in our ears rattled around in the back of our brains and came out our fingertips with no conscious recognition on the way through.

                      Two things about this, if I was copying a message in that 'auto daze' and if the message contained my name I would immediately be jerked to attention and I would miss the next word or so! The other was that in the early 70's some of us made solid state Morse keyboards and they were great for ease of sending but after a while we discovered a problem. The words we would read from paper or whatever and type on the keyboard but our brains heard the words being sent via the side tone receiver and then we would send the word again, so, in the eyes-out the finger tips-back in via the ears-out the finger tips once again. I never use a keyboard now.

                      Speed, like I said our working speed was 20wpm or so which was logical really, we did not want to have to repeat stuff and much of the aero traffic was in numeric or alpha-numeric codes so there was little chance for the receiver to 'fill in' missed characters. I do not claim to be a fast operator and never have, like I said, 20wpm on the air but if I do an on-line test I can read a bit at 35wpm.

                      We all had semi-auto 'bug' keys but only used on circuits where we knew the other end could handle the speed or if they asked QRQ.

                      Sometimes the receiving end would ask for 'shorts' when we were handling numeric codes and we would send with alpha characters corresponding to numeric chars, A for a 1, B for a 7 and N for a 9, they were really alpha chars created by omitting all but one of the 'dahs' in each numeric char.

                      John

                      (I am getting all misty eyed!)

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                      • #12
                        Extra class here. I'm currently re-learning morse code now. Had to learn it to upgrade to general, but never used it. Just bought a new Yaesu FTDX10 to use with my ZS6BKW antenna.

                        Ted

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                        • #13
                          Been a Ham since late 1970s, Advanced Class. I have a HF rig I purchased and even put up a antenna for last year but have not been on the air with it, going to do digital... someday. Was very active on HF back in the day.
                          Last edited by wmgeorge; 06-02-2022, 06:56 AM.
                          Retired - Journeyman Refrigeration Pipefitter - Master Electrician

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                          • #14
                            Well, my into to being a HAM was my first job out of High School. I worked at West Mountain Radio. If any of you bought a Rig Blaster in early 2000's, I probably either assembled it and or tested it. My first radio was a 706 Mk2G. Wish I still had it!

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                            • #15
                              Got my ticket in the 90's. KB1NPU. Not very active unless listening on echolink counts. Then I'd have to say very active. Love the cell phone app.

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