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Stefan Gotteswinter's last video

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  • Stefan Gotteswinter's last video

    This guy does some really cool things in his shop. He was turning something so small on a watchmakers lathe he had to use a microscope to see what he was doing while turning. I think his "ruff" stock was 1.6mm in diameter. He often says something like, it is within 3 microns that is good enough it doesn't have to be closer! I don't have anything in my shop that will measure microns! If I get within .01mm I am a very happy guy.
    Location: The Black Forest in Germany

    How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

  • #2
    Get a Mahr gauge.

    -D
    DZER

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    • #3
      Yes, if I was 50 years younger and really applied myself I might come close to his skill, but it is doubtful. Given the limited time that I have remaining, I can only envy his skills.
      Fred Townroe

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      • #4
        You can measure sub-micron distances with any DSLR.

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        • #5
          I work to millionths sometimes, of a mile (.06336”) that’s good enough, I have a hammer that’s calibrated in tenths, of a stone.
          he is German so I think it’s genetic myself, I jest, he’s a talent no doubt, but blackforrest can ride a horse ( I fall off well)
          and I got lessons!, pity they weren’t staying on lessons
          mark

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          • #6
            I like horses, but I can't stay on one to save my ass.

            I can fall off a merry-go-round.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by elf View Post
              You can measure sub-micron distances with any DSLR.
              Explain please

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              • #8
                Originally posted by RB211 View Post

                Explain please
                The software needed is Zerene Stacker, a focus stacking program. In normal usage the camera or subject is moved closer or further apart. To measure distance, the camera or subject is moved horizontally.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by elf View Post

                  The software needed is Zerene Stacker, a focus stacking program. In normal usage the camera or subject is moved closer or further apart. To measure distance, the camera or subject is moved horizontally.
                  Wild stuff!

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                  • #10
                    I sold all of my Mitutoyo digital mics which ran to 0.0005" or microns, but still have an 0-25mm mechanical Mitutoyo with a vernier scale on the barrel in microns. I never need that resolution with practical work. Mitutoyo make a digital mic which goes to 0.0001 mm which seems touch daft to me.

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                    • #11
                      Nothing that measures microns? What do you mean?

                      0.01 mm IS 10 microns. So you are measuring in microns, just with a 10 micron precision.

                      I just set one of my inexpensive (<$20), imported calipers to 0.01 mm. And I checked that the jaws were open. I could see light between them. When the jaws are closed it reads 0.00 mm and I can not see any light between them. I know that's just a rough check, but it does show they are working at that level.

                      And my $40 digital micrometer reads down to 0.001 mm which is one micron. No, I can not see light between the anvils when set to that value. Perhaps with some magnification that may be possible, I never tried. And yes, it is only specified to +/-0.005mm or 5 microns. But differential readings at the one micron level can be useful in some circumstances.

                      We all work in microns, just not always in single digits. And we only rarely need better than +/-0.005" or +/-100 microns.

                      Heck, a yard stick can measure in microns, just a lot of them.



                      Originally posted by Black Forest View Post
                      This guy does some really cool things in his shop. He was turning something so small on a watchmakers lathe he had to use a microscope to see what he was doing while turning. I think his "ruff" stock was 1.6mm in diameter. He often says something like, it is within 3 microns that is good enough it doesn't have to be closer! I don't have anything in my shop that will measure microns! If I get within .01mm I am a very happy guy.
                      Paul A.
                      SE Texas

                      And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                      You will find that it has discrete steps.

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