Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Shop made screws

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Rich Carlstedt
    replied
    Very Nice John, is that a Bagel with Cream Cheese you set them on ? 😀

    Yes, buying screws works sometimes , but when you need scale heads , or Square heads, it gets slim pickings

    Rich

    Leave a comment:


  • John MacArthur
    replied
    Here's how I do it:
    Click image for larger version  Name:	25 milling screw.jpg Views:	0 Size:	889.5 KB ID:	2003489 Click image for larger version  Name:	33 second batch W-1.jpg Views:	0 Size:	1,011.1 KB ID:	2003490
    These are milled, hardened, and tempered #0-80 screws for mounting clock jewels
    Johnny
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • Tim Clarke
    replied
    I was able to turn the shank in one pass with a razor sharp hi positive insert with almost no nose radius

    Leave a comment:


  • deltap
    replied
    For just a few you could turn the thread od close to the chuck. If you need a longer thread, advance stock a little at a time while still cutting close to the chuck. thread with a tailstock die holder that spins free when when you let it go. I usually start thread under power and finish by hand when close to the hex. Turn die around if you want to thread right up to the hex head. A reverse center would work better for small stuff. Point the end of the stock and support in a tailstock holder. Much of this tooling may not be available to purchase but you can make your self.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tim Clarke
    replied
    A while back I made a run of 4-40 hex head screws. I used 5/32 12L14 hex stock. It was my first use of my rear mount tool holder, and turret tailstock. Click image for larger version  Name:	813076B8-1DBD-471B-8B03-F6DDC610DB93.jpg Views:	101 Size:	1.55 MB ID:	2003427 Click image for larger version  Name:	D3D9F010-B4E7-495F-9006-E760E6111B9C.jpg Views:	101 Size:	1.57 MB ID:	2003428 Click image for larger version  Name:	D026968E-8A3B-440B-B903-C1D2984D5826.jpg Views:	101 Size:	1.61 MB ID:	2003429 Click image for larger version  Name:	76ED1F96-8BCE-4C9D-9C7B-3789713797FB.jpg Views:	102 Size:	1.70 MB ID:	2003430
    Last edited by Tim Clarke; 06-07-2022, 12:06 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • BCRider
    replied
    Thanks Rich. That describes the full process neatly.

    I like your "sticks" idea for the reason you gave.

    I was also thinking like you of a parting step that also chamfers or rounds the head at the same time. But with that extra load do you not find you end up with center nibs that need addressing?

    All in all though I do have to agree with Marv that where the sizes fit perhaps machining with our charge card might be the handier option... I find the prices from Microfasteners to be very attractive.

    Leave a comment:


  • mklotz
    replied
    Originally posted by GordonL View Post
    Folks talk about making their own to scale hex head screws. How do you machine something that small? When you are making something like 1/8" dia or less x 1/2 to 3/4 long the piece just bends away from the cutter no matter how sharp the tool may be. Is there some way to cut front and back at the same time?
    Usually there are lots more fun things to make on a model than fasteners. You might want to give a thought to buying rather than making...

    https://www.microfasteners.com/home.php?cat=576

    Leave a comment:


  • old mart
    replied
    The screw could be held on an er collet in one of the hexagon collet blocks, or a straight shank one if it was to be held in a chuck on a rotary table. This is for milling the head.
    For the shank, also use a collet in the lathe spindle and start with only a short length overhanging, then move it out and repeat as often as the length requires.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rich Carlstedt
    replied
    Originally posted by BCRider View Post
    ...............Rich, that is a very well thought out tool you made. Apparently a team effort with each new idea I'm sure. The only thing missing is an easy way to part off the turned and threaded bolt.............................................. ..............................................that it's highly adaptable to a pretty wide range of small screw sizes.
    BCRider, After the "Threading" operation, - I mount the die with my left hand while holding the carriage wheel with my right, and then bring the carriage "in" until the die starts-
    The boss makes sure we are on center 100 % and the work picks up the die (threading) and when I see that I am threaded almost to the desired end of thread, I back off the carriage and only grip the die lightly. When the die hits to end of my desired thread length, i release the die and it spins with the work piece ...even down to 0-80 thread !.( its balanced and spins nicely)
    I stop the lathe and go into reverse and lightly grab the die and it spins off ( carriage out of the way of course). No brake on the lathe, just normal start/stop.

    I have parted off in the lathe but do not usually do that . If you want to part immediately. then mount the Box Tool in the Tail Stock and that frees up the tool post for a parting tool
    This I only do when I have Hex Stock as raw material in most cases so I have a finished screw with parting. (Parting Tool is ground to leave a chamfer on the hex portion as we normally see)

    Most of the time, I deal with "Sticks" ..That is round material cut into 6-8 inch lengths. and have maybe 4 to 12 of those and then turn and thread both ends, Then put them into a Collet Block
    and mill them for Square or Hex heads where the threaded portion ends ( Not the whole stick ). Then the sticks go back into the Lathe and get Parted off and I start all over with shorter sticks.

    Rich

    Edit
    One of the advantages of sticks is rounding the end of the screw - easily done !
    Remember it's threaded , but the start of the thread may be rough.
    So I approach the Scotchbrite Wheel ( on a pedestal grinder) with the stick at a 45 degree downward angle
    and kiss the start of the thread, while spinning the stick and then gradually lower the stick til it is horizontal in about two to three seconds
    You get a nice crowned end on the screws
    Last edited by Rich Carlstedt; 06-06-2022, 04:00 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • BCRider
    replied
    I haven't used that method "in anger" yet but I did try it to see how well it works. And it works extremely well!

    Rich, that is a very well thought out tool you made. Apparently a team effort with each new idea I'm sure. The only thing missing is an easy way to part off the turned and threaded bolt.

    My own lathe does not do well at stopping on a dime so if I were using such a threading fixture I think I'd make it so I was only hand holding it so it spins in my grip when it bottoms out against the head of the screw. Or at least that I could let go when it's threaded on far enough. Then shut off and unscrew the die by hand after retracting the main tool body. Is that how it works for you use or do you slow down the RPM and use the set screw all the time?

    It would be a fair bit of work to make up an all in one box tool of that sort. But the nice thing is that it's highly adaptable to a pretty wide range of small screw sizes.

    Leave a comment:


  • GordonL
    replied
    OK Thanks. That should work well.

    I also just did an experiment on cutting full depth with a single pass and it works well. I have always tried to take multiple cuts which results in spring back. I will have to try that technique the next time I make valves. No reason why that should not work. Like I said I have always used a center in the tail stock and removed the end after I got the stem to the correct diameter.

    Thanks.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rich Carlstedt
    replied
    Originally posted by GordonL View Post
    Rich:
    I have seen something similar to that before but I don't remember where. How do you adjust the cutter to obtain the correct diameter? Do you just keep advancing the cutter until you get the correct diameter?
    Back in the early 1990's there was a article in Model Tech magazine with a box tool for threading , then my friend Richard Vandenberg improved that design about 1999, and then I made even more changes.
    Setting the cutter is one of my several changes, its as simple as pie and here is a picture showing how with a Depth Mike.
    The anvil of the Mike touches the toolbit and you measure the test result (OD Mike) and then adjust the depth mike to get the diameter you want ( Half the difference of OD reading from ideal size)
    Then slide the toolbit to the Mike and clamp- Done
    Rich

    Click image for larger version

Name:	PA310213- Back Side.jpg
Views:	544
Size:	1.07 MB
ID:	2003396 Click image for larger version

Name:	P6060111.jpg
Views:	535
Size:	656.4 KB
ID:	2003397

    Leave a comment:


  • J Tiers
    replied
    That's the same thing I have done, although I've never done it to THAT extreme. I use HSS, same deal, small nose, cut on the face. I use a "slicer" high rake tool, but it obviously works with that carbide as well. I think I have posted doing that to make custom counterbore noses.

    They may have an 0.062 shank, and might be pretty good size on the nose part, maybe 5/16" for that shank. Depends what counterbore you have and what shank it needs.. They usually don't need any longer than about 1.25 inches in length.

    Gotta be sure the tool is dead-on-center if you go to the extent he did.

    Leave a comment:


  • ezduzit
    replied
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X-TkuQDWdbA

    Leave a comment:


  • GordonL
    replied
    Rich:
    I have seen something similar to that before but I don't remember where. How do you adjust the cutter to obtain the correct diameter? Do you just keep advancing the cutter until you get the correct diameter?

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X