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  • DaveD44
    replied
    Originally posted by ammcoman2 View Post
    I have been getting my nuts and machine screws from this:

    https://godshallscustommachining.com/index.html
    Yes, I use, or used, them extensively, and for many years the couple who used to own this business, Ron and Barbara Hankins at American Model Engineering.

    Originally posted by ChazC View Post

    Take a look at small metric: Bolt Depot has 18-8 SS tap bolts (fully threaded) in M3-0.5: 5.5mm/0.217" hex (no head height in their chart) and SS M3-0.5 hex nuts (also 5.5mm), that are 2.4mm/0.09" high. Nuts are $3.04/100 and 10mm long bolts are $7.65/100.
    Oh! I had forgotten. I used M5-.8 high strength cap screws in several places where I needed the strength, such as the union of the main frame and the cradle--that piece that is behind the main frame, under the fire box, and above the trailing truck--which is an area that needs to be well-held (clip attached). They mimic the prototype scaled fairly well. But if they are to be seen, the tops of the screws must have the lettering skimmed off, which I didn't do here but should have.

    Click image for larger version  Name:	0615220804.jpg Views:	0 Size:	793.9 KB ID:	2004698

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  • ChazzC
    replied
    Originally posted by DaveD44 View Post

    Are these screws from microfasteners anywhere close to model size, i.e., scaled prototype size (my loco is slightly larger than 1/8 scale)?

    For my loco I generally buy or make what are close to scaled prototype sizes. For example, a 6-32 model screw , which scales down from just about one inch, has a 7/32 (0.219) head that is 0.104 high; the nuts are also 7/32 hex and are .125 high. They also have washer lands on the heads and nuts. A typical 6-32 machine screw doesn't come with a hex head, and the nut is made from 5/16 (0.313) hex, much too large for model application.

    McMaster has a nice line of SS hex head screws and nuts; their 6-32 screw has a 1/4" (0.250) hex head, still too large, and is 0.085 high with no washer land. A sample 6-32 size is PN 92314A144. They are reasonably priced, but not quite what I need. My model hex cap screw supplier is OK, but I would like to find a second source.
    Take a look at small metric: Bolt Depot has 18-8 SS tap bolts (fully threaded) in M3-0.5: 5.5mm/0.217" hex (no head height in their chart) and SS M3-0.5 hex nuts (also 5.5mm), that are 2.4mm/0.09" high. Nuts are $3.04/100 and 10mm long bolts are $7.65/100.

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  • ammcoman2
    replied
    I have been getting my nuts and machine screws from this:

    https://godshallscustommachining.com/index.html

    Very satisfied with their stuff.

    Geoff

    Leave a comment:


  • DaveD44
    replied
    Originally posted by mklotz View Post

    Usually there are lots more fun things to make on a model than fasteners. You might want to give a thought to buying rather than making...

    https://www.microfasteners.com/home.php?cat=576
    Are these screws from microfasteners anywhere close to model size, i.e., scaled prototype size (my loco is slightly larger than 1/8 scale)?

    For my loco I generally buy or make what are close to scaled prototype sizes. For example, a 6-32 model screw , which scales down from just about one inch, has a 7/32 (0.219) head that is 0.104 high; the nuts are also 7/32 hex and are .125 high. They also have washer lands on the heads and nuts. A typical 6-32 machine screw doesn't come with a hex head, and the nut is made from 5/16 (0.313) hex, much too large for model application.

    McMaster has a nice line of SS hex head screws and nuts; their 6-32 screw has a 1/4" (0.250) hex head, still too large, and is 0.085 high with no washer land. A sample 6-32 size is PN 92314A144. They are reasonably priced, but not quite what I need. My model hex cap screw supplier is OK, but I would like to find a second source.

    Leave a comment:


  • jimsehr
    replied
    Click image for larger version

Name:	9A2A821B-3112-407D-A246-DAF6A80EDC5A.jpg
Views:	120
Size:	579.3 KB
ID:	2004039 Here is tool I made for my Logan lathe.

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  • mklotz
    replied
    Originally posted by GordonL View Post
    I did buy some 5-40 Hex head from Microfasteners.com and they do look good. The main problem is the limited range of sizes. I need about 80 pieces of 5-40 x 1/4 and the only choice is 5-40 x 1/2 so I now have a bunch of screws to shorten. That will take less time than making all of them but still a lot of work.
    Reflect on how happy you will be next time you need a 3/8 or 1/2 inch screw :-)

    Seriously, I always buy long and cut to fit. If you're making models, save the cutoffs; they make great studs - real or cheater.

    Any of numerous simple jig designs and a Dremel armed with a cutoff wheel will make the trimming go fast.

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  • GordonL
    replied
    I did buy some 5-40 Hex head from Microfasteners.com and they do look good. The main problem is the limited range of sizes. I need about 80 pieces of 5-40 x 1/4 and the only choice is 5-40 x 1/2 so I now have a bunch of screws to shorten. That will take less time than making all of them but still a lot of work.

    Leave a comment:


  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by Tim Clarke View Post

    I don’t think either will work for you, Jerry. What about playing the bagpipes? I’ve been told that girls like bagpipe music.
    Referring to Shakespeare, I seem to recall that he has a character say that some men cannot contain their urine when they hear bagpipes (possibly from Merchant of Venice?). I'd maybe learn them just to find out who that may be, hopefully some politician I don't like.

    But as for CNC, I've never been really good at following silly orders, so I'll keep cranking handles for now. I did think of CNC-ing the Benchmaster, but I like the mill enough as it is that I shan't .

    Leave a comment:


  • ChazzC
    replied
    Watch Joe Pie's playlist "Scale Models:" he makes incredibly small screws on what looks like a 10" or 12" lathe. Here he's making a 1/8" Ø x 1-1/4" left-hand lead screw (2" OA length): https://youtu.be/ApSNZqC_g1g

    And here he is single-pointing 2-56 threads: https://youtu.be/gF1UtnKOg2A

    MrCrispin goes into making a number of SS hex nuts (albeit 0.560" across the flats), starting with round rod: https://youtu.be/IoAu8TGU58Y
    Last edited by ChazzC; 06-08-2022, 10:45 AM.

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  • Tim Clarke
    replied
    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

    Your only choices are to go CNC, or take up knitting or Mah-jong. Read any machining forum and you can find that out.
    I don’t think either will work for you, Jerry. What about playing the bagpipes? I’ve been told that girls like bagpipe music.

    Leave a comment:


  • John MacArthur
    replied
    Originally posted by BCRider View Post

    Which doesn't help those of us without CNC setups one little bit.... I think he did some great looking screws... .But also that he's showing off his CNC to us more pedestrian folks just a little bit.....
    Thank you for the compliment. It was given to me, had obsolete electronics and "anti-backlash" leadscrews (which don't work). That said, the basic unit (Dyna) is quite rigid and heavy. I spent weeks building a saddle for ballscrews, and replaced the stepmotors and drive system. I had an old Flashcut system that was very unreliable which I had paid very little for, but on which Flashcut allowed me a generous "cash for clunkers" trade-in. I have quite a bit less in this little CNC than you might think. However, I don't recommend this approach to anybody except the truly obsessive. I've also made hundreds of tiny screws with threading dies, and spent many more hours filing and polishing them to get rid of the galling and flash. I certainly won't go back at this stage, I've earned it, and yes, I suppose I'm showing off just a little.
    Johnny

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by BCRider View Post

    Which doesn't help those of us without CNC setups one little bit.... I think he did some great looking screws... .But also that he's showing off his CNC to us more pedestrian folks just a little bit.....
    Your only choices are to go CNC, or take up knitting or Mah-jong. Read any machining forum and you can find that out.

    Leave a comment:


  • BCRider
    replied
    Originally posted by rklopp View Post
    I love single-profile threadmilling small screws like John shows. ...
    Which doesn't help those of us without CNC setups one little bit.... I think he did some great looking screws... .But also that he's showing off his CNC to us more pedestrian folks just a little bit.....

    Leave a comment:


  • rklopp
    replied
    I love single-profile threadmilling small screws like John shows. You can get repeatable size right up to a shoulder with beautiful finish and perfect lead-out. You can cut any pitch you want. Plus it’s fast except compared to a die, which does not make threads anywhere near as nice. Thread milling is best done on a mill with helical interpolation capability. Then the threading move is a one-liner in code.

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  • John MacArthur
    replied
    Looks like a bagel doesn't it. It's a piece of "pithwood" that clockmakers use to poke small thing into to clean off grit, dust and grease, about 1" in dia.
    Johnny

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