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An interesting project (U-joint yoke)

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  • An interesting project (U-joint yoke)

    No pics yet but I'm making a new yoke for the driveshaft for the table feeds etc on the ol' mill.
    Some may recall that the cast yoke snapped off when the rusted knee let loose(hydraulic jacks ).
    It had been broken and repaired before and the new break was pretty disasterous. The one side broke into many pieces right where the screw goes into the block.
    I searched everywhere for one of these old fashioned yoke and block setups but couldn't find one.
    It HAS to be exactly the same size of u-joint or the whole thing won't work.
    I have a bunch of neat little u-joints that I used on various race car setups over the years but they are a little too long or not heavy enough so I decided to make one.
    Started out with 2 1/2" round 1045 and have a lot of the basic machine work done. Just getting into the guts of the more tricky stuff now.
    When it's done I'll cut the old one off the cast (yes Martha...cast) shaft and weld it on.
    Been quite an exercise for a dummass noob to figure out how to hold this thing at times but it's getting there.
    I'm sure glad I'm not charging myself to do this by the hour
    Russ
    I have tools I don't even know I own...

  • #2
    Originally posted by torker
    Been quite an exercise for a dummass noob to figure out how to hold this thing at times but it's getting there.
    I'm sure glad I'm not charging myself to do this by the hour
    Russ
    But wait! Why not? Put it toward your machine-shop fund!
    The curse of having precise measuring tools is being able to actually see how imperfect everything is.

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    • #3
      Geez Russ,when I first read the title I though,man no Lincoln Towncars around
      I just need one more tool,just one!

      Comment


      • #4
        Geez Russ,when I first read the title I thought,man no Lincoln Towncar steering columns around
        I just need one more tool,just one!

        Comment


        • #5
          Darin...I wish!
          This is kind of an oddball setup.
          When the knee is lowered the inside slip shaft is actually pushed right through the yoke and almost touches the block.
          Then when the knee is raised all the way up the inside shaft comes within 5/8" of pulling right out of the yoke shaft.
          I want to keep it this way if I can. If the yoke is longer I have to shorten the yoke shaft and it would be awful close to pulling right out. I don't want to risk that.
          Right now I'm pouting.
          When I drilled the cross holes for the block pins...my setup slipped a bit and the holes are now drilled crooked.
          Now I have to weld in the buggered hole...set it all up again and redrill it.
          Kickin my ass! There was a better way of holding the work but it didn't dawn on me til after I buggered up a couple of evenings work.
          I have tools I don't even know I own...

          Comment


          • #6
            Well don't feel too bad,I did a run of 25 parts the otherday,all exactly alike,except for one that for some reason had one hole exactly .025" off center.......because I loaded in in the vise wrong Doh!
            I just need one more tool,just one!

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            • #7
              Thanks D! Quite a few more little mistakes behind me now but it'll be done someday
              Here it is in its (STILL) infancy.
              Beside it is what is left of the broken yoke.
              I turned the basic raw dimensions out of 1045 to 2 1/4" OD, bored it out to 1"ID, then bored the old shaft out to 1" ID for a short distance so the whole thing could have an indexing plug put in it for brazing in the proper position.
              I decided to braze this rather than welding it. The casting is pretty dirty.
              I milled out a slot on both sides then put the thing in the H/V saw and knocked off some waste, then back in the mill to rough it out some more.
              Still lots of machining to do yet...more than I thought!
              This would be so much easier if I'd take a day or so to mount my DRO and I may stop to do that yet.

              Russ
              I have tools I don't even know I own...

              Comment


              • #8
                Ha...made some pretty good progress tonight...between periods of the NHL final!
                And...I'm in love yet again
                I usually use Niagra roughers when I need to remove a bunch of metal like this. Well, I sorta just use them when company comes, so they think I'm rich
                I bought a couple of Dolfa "Hog" 3/8" roughers awhile back and forgot I had them.
                I popped one in tonight to try it out.
                Kudos to them! They cut as good as the Niagras and where a bit cheaper.
                How long they'll last compared is up for grabs I guess.
                I love these things (roughers).
                A nice rooster tail of fine chips falls in the same pile. They cut down on vibration and for my lil' ol' mill/drill that isn't supposed to be able to even cut aluminum....they cut pretty good I'd say.
                3/4" deep cut, .050 doc at about 10ipm. When running the cutter back it just barely touches so I must have very little deflection.
                Actually I'm a little disappointed, I thought I'd be several hours whittlin this out but all that's left is some finish passes for the opening for the block.
                The main removal took about 20 minutes with the roughers.
                I was thinking how fast I could whack this thing out on the ol' horizontal with a 6"X1/2" staggered tooth cutter. For stuff like this the old OHIO is gonna rock!
                Russ
                I have tools I don't even know I own...

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                • #9
                  The things we will do to repair some old junk machinery. be their done that. If only some of you could have seen tke junk I have rebuilt. You would have shook your head an walked off.
                  Every Mans Work Is A Portrait of Him Self
                  http://sites.google.com/site/machinistsite/TWO-BUDDIES
                  http://s178.photobucket.com/user/lan...?sort=3&page=1

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by lane
                    You would have shook your head an walked off.
                    Nope...We would have accepted you for the crazy brother you are
                    I have tools I don't even know I own...

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Oh ya...Lane, another thing.
                      Once my beautiful ol' mill is pumping out gears at an astounding rate of 2 to 3 per month (estimated projection) you will prolly be all tryin to buddy up with me to share the glory and the bucks
                      I have tools I don't even know I own...

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        It works! A little hand radiusing, some deburring and it's done.


                        I love it! Asked around a couple of the machine shops here to see if perhaps they might have an old one of these laying around.
                        None did and they all said..."That's too hard to make. Find an automotive joint to adapt" (I would have if they would have fit the application)
                        A fair amount of chips in the pan after this.
                        The Dolfa endmills...I think they do outcut the Niagras in the beginning but don't seem to last as long. They may be "too" sharp to start with and perhaps dull down quicker. Still pretty decent endmills though.
                        Had another nice suprise. Used a new 1/2 dia Chinese Tin coated four flute mill for finishing. It cut very well and left a near mirror finish. Another cutter I forgot I had.
                        Ha...not so for the regular (read really cheap) 1/2" cutter. It lasted for two passes and started smoking
                        Russ
                        I have tools I don't even know I own...

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          OK...now it really is done!
                          This was a little harder (for me) than it looked at the start.
                          Made a few boo-boos that cost a bunch of time. Didn't use the proper sequencing of machining was the biggest problem
                          I turned most of the yoke to pretty close OD finish size then brazed it on the old cast shaft. Should have brazed it on while it was still a rougher shape.
                          It's also much easier to hold and index when glued onto the shaft.
                          All in all a very fun project and it still has the vintage look although I did leave a little more meat on the one I built. The old one had failed in the same spot before for whatever reason so I'm hoping the extra meat will stop that.

                          Russ
                          I have tools I don't even know I own...

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            An interesting project ( U-joint yoke)

                            Russ that is a beautiful job , One thing I may have considered was to make a spare at the same time (murphy's law) .


                            Regards Graeme

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                            • #15
                              Nice job Russ,so when you gonna smoke test the mill?
                              I just need one more tool,just one!

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