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  • Bicycle chain

    So, is bicycle chain #35?
    Ive been thinking making a hot dog /sausage roller for my barbecue. Seems like the rotisserie motor would work, and I have some stainless tube....
    I cut it off twice; it's still too short
    Oregon, USA

  • #2
    No. It is not 35. It’s longer pitch and narrower than 35

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    • #3
      Yea, Tim, bike chain is a different animal from industrial chain. But if it works for your purpose, providing you can make bike sprockets work for you, sail on. Most bike sprockets are usually hardened and difficult to work with.
      Sarge41

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      • #4
        Same rollers and pitch as #40, but super- narrow.

        Amusingly, there are several competing variants in the industry at any given time...

        For a long time I had an uninterrupted supply of 'worn out' parts, so I've used it for a few things.
        It's fine. Deliberately sloppy, though, so it can derail. And the bike sprockets are also
        designed to let the stuff derail.

        fwiw.

        t
        rusting in Seattle

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        • #5
          It might not be an industrial standard but it sure is used for a lot of things other than bicycles! There are a couple of old garage door openers in my stash and they all had about 8' of bicycle chain.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Tim Clarke View Post
            So, is bicycle chain #35?
            Ive been thinking making a hot dog /sausage roller for my barbecue. Seems like the rotisserie motor would work, and I have some stainless tube....
            Close, bike chain is similar to #40, in that it's 1/2 inch pitch, but it's available in a variety of thinner widths. Probably be a perfect choice for your application.

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            • #7
              On a bicycle it has to withstand a fair amount of torque- like a 200 lb guy hammering his weight against the pedals, with a torque increase of about double on the smaller sprocket. I don't think you'd have any issues in your application.
              I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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              • #8
                Just think - you could be the first in your neighborhood with an 18 speed rotisserie!!!!
                Kansas City area

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by darryl View Post
                  On a bicycle it has to withstand a fair amount of torque- like a 200 lb guy hammering his weight against the pedals, with a torque increase of about double on the smaller sprocket. I don't think you'd have any issues in your application.
                  All a chain experiences is tension. Not torque.
                  The radius of the driver sprocket determines the tension.
                  If you refer to the smaller sprocket in a bicycle application,
                  it has nothing to do with tension (or torque increase?) in the chain.

                  -Doozer
                  DZER

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                  • #10
                    In the UK all push-bike chains are 1/2" pitch and either 1/8" or 3/32" width between the side plates (unless metric variants have appeared while I wasn't watching). I've no idea how that compares with industrial chains. The 3/32" chain is reported to be stronger than the 1/8" chain, presumably because the pivots are shorter. For a rotisserie I should think that even meccano chain would be strong enough; I presume you're not spit-roasting an elephant.

                    George

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                    • #11
                      You can't push a chain
                      (unless it has no where else to go).

                      -D
                      DZER

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                      • #12
                        Have you seen the tiny front chainring on some of the 'new' stuff?

                        Darry's 200 pounder on an 8" crank and a 2" radius chainring's going
                        to be a half- ton static- but he's jumping on the thing, so figure 4x that, minimum.

                        That said, actively- used bike chain has a lifespan measured in months.

                        t
                        it's overkill for a rotisserie.
                        rusting in Seattle

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                        • #13
                          As mentioned earlier, different sizes generally based on the number of gears in the drive train.
                          https://www.parktool.com/blog/repair...-compatibility

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                          • #14
                            This is the text I originally posted:
                            "Bicycle chain is #41 It's the same pitch as #40, but thinner.

                            This is what appeared on the screen:

                            Bicycle chain is 3 phase It's the same pitch as metals -- sources and rust and slag but thinner
                            Last edited by projectnut; 06-16-2022, 03:00 PM.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by projectnut View Post
                              This is the text I originally posted:
                              "Bicycle chain is #41 It's the same pitch as #40, but thinner.

                              This is what appeared on the screen:

                              Bicycle chain is 3 phase It's the same pitch as metals -- sources and rust and slag but thinner
                              Well, that's weird. No idea what's up with that.
                              George
                              Traverse City, MI

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