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  • #16
    Originally posted by George Bulliss View Post

    Well, that's weird. No idea what's up with that.
    Something is messed up in the matrix. I think it has to do with the “pound” symbol with a number in the post.

    I recently tried to post a reply with the “pound” symbol
    followed by a number. It all looked good before I hit the “post reply” button. Once it went on the screen it was a bunch of jibberish. I tried again on edit and the same thing happened. I finally had to type out “number” instead of using the “pound” key.


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    • #17
      Bicycle chain is not number 41 chain. I promise you.

      -D
      DZER

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by George Bulliss View Post

        Well, that's weird. No idea what's up with that.
        That's pretty common, actually.

        I've had the site apparently interpret something as intending to create a link. Often that is a simple shift button press for a capital letter. It ends up inserting a link, or in other cases, erasing everything that was written.

        No doubt it arises from some fat-fingered mistyping, but I have seen it a number of times. Very odd and disconcerting. Makes me happy that the site retains what was typed, so such problems can be reversed.
        CNC machines only go through the motions.

        Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
        Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
        Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
        I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
        Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

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        • #19
          Auto correct- the big brother, the stupid one 3 phase rust and slag, ha ha. Finally, I understand chain

          Torque and tension, yes it is simply tension in the chain. Torque is not the right word- unless perhaps in reference to twisting the chain.

          Another way to look at it as a drive chain for a barbeque is that it would not be lubed to begin with, but it would absorb from the atmosphere in the barbeque. That might mean that until heated up, the chain might be stiff. Your options are simple- just change the chain when you need to. If the chain is external to the barbeque, then you'd use something like bike chain lube, the anti-fling stuff, and it will probably last forever. One thing chains don't like is running dry with significant tension on them. That will wear them out fast.

          A friend got a Harley a few weeks ago. First thing I did was look at the chain (as I do with my own m/c.) It looked dry- that kind of spooks me. You don't know the history of it- how many miles it was run like that. I've heard the stories of a chain breaking and whipping your ear off- or your arm. Not that it would be a problem for a barbeque- you'd be more concerned about the roast flying apart and finding yourself eating it before it was ready
          I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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          • #20
            Originally posted by projectnut View Post
            This is the text I originally posted:
            "Bicycle chain is #41 It's the same pitch as #40, but thinner.

            This is what appeared on the screen:

            Bicycle chain is 3 phase It's the same pitch as metals -- sources and rust and slag but thinner
            Sounds perfectly all right to me. Obviously a 3-phase bike chain gives a smoother output than single-phase, the same as with lathe motors. The rust and slag speaks for itself.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Doozer View Post
              You can't push a chain
              (unless it has no where else to go).

              -D
              Of course you can push a chain - how else do you suppose it gets to the back sprocket? Perhaps I should have referred to the push-bike as a 'treader' as we did when I was a yoof.

              George

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              • #22
                Yeah, the 'hashtag' symbol is doing something whacky.

                "#200"
                works out ok with quotes but

                B & S vs Starrett dial caliper

                without the quotes...

                and it only seems to happen when you put the # in front of something else.

                Looks like it takes you to thread # whatever is after the Bicycle chain

                Yup- it's the thread number.

                t
                skinny floppy #40, is what bicycle chain is.
                Last edited by Tobias-B; 06-17-2022, 12:20 PM.
                rusting in Seattle

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Georgineer View Post

                  Of course you can push a chain - how else do you suppose it gets to the back sprocket?

                  George
                  It is pulled there.

                  -D
                  DZER

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                  • #24
                    Tim, late to the game, but we used 35 chain for our go -carts and mini bikes back in the 60's. Kinda standard back when. Hope you are well !
                    Last edited by Fasturn; 06-17-2022, 08:25 PM.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Fasturn View Post
                      Tim, late to the game, but we used Starrett Precision Bench Micrometer (SUPERMIC) chain for our go -carts and mini bikes back in the 60's. Kinda standard back when. Hope you are well !
                      Where does the chain go in the micrometer? Lol.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by oxford View Post

                        Where does the chain go in the micrometer? Lol.
                        Good point ol boy? I wrote 35 ...Starrett Precision Bench Micrometer (SUPERMIC) ...Starrett Precision Bench) twice and it put in a super mic ????? Then I said ah hell, just erase it ¿
                        Soooo it been edited . That was fun hey. Never a dull moment on this site. Glad you found it....and not JR. Btw see it did it again. Russians are hacking. When I type # it inserts the blue. Huh.
                        Last edited by Fasturn; 06-17-2022, 08:37 PM.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Fasturn View Post

                          Good point ol boy? .
                          See my post a little ways up. I knew what happened, happened to me as well. I was just poking a little fun

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Georgineer View Post

                            Of course you can push a chain - how else do you suppose it gets to the back sprocket? Perhaps I should have referred to the push-bike as a 'treader' as we did when I was a yoof.

                            George
                            If you look at a video of loading the large guns in US battleships, you will see something that looks remarkably like a large roller chain, which appears to unroll from somewhere. It is used to load (ram) the projectile and the powder bags. So that appears to be a "pushable" chain.........
                            CNC machines only go through the motions.

                            Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
                            Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
                            Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
                            I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
                            Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Artillery uses it as well

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                              • #30
                                There are many ways to push a chain. As long as it has a guide, it works pretty well and the artillery videos above show how they can solve some tricky space issues.

                                Even better are chains designed specifically to be pushed. I've worked quite a bit with the folks at Serapid, a fairly small, very innovative company. No one has heard of them, but everyone has seen what they can do - open the roofs of stadiums, move the SkyBox in the Willis Tower in Chicago, etc
                                SE MI, USA

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