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Rotary Table tricks and tips!

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  • Rotary Table tricks and tips!

    I thought I'd share something I do in the shop when using my rotary table that I'm not sure others do, or haven't ever seen or heard of them doing. My hobby revolves around making fishing reels, mostly Centerpin reels so I use my rotary table a lot. I despise "holes" so I tend to do more complex porting which requires a lot of angle set ups and tend to go into the minutes and seconds a lot.

    Often, when transcribing the coordinates onto my prints from the computer I find I can sometimes make a mistake and with the parts I'm machining I simply cannot afford one mistake! They have already spent many hours on the lathe and many have have very specialised soft jaws built for them so to to go back is not an option. So I found a way to proof the coordinates but using coloured markers to "map the rotab" if you will. If you use one long enough and do the type of work I use it for you'll come to learn there are patterns in the numbers and as you map them around the table you'll come to know if something is wrong real quick!

    It's helped me avoid mistakes on many occasions. Once mapped it helps to avoid accidental coordinate stops like landing on 103* when you wanted 113*. You may ask how a mistake like that could be made but stand over the mill for 4 hours staring at the table and ask me again LOL. The markers do two things, confirm your coordinates before making any cuts and help you to avoid making a mistake there after.

    I hope this is of some use for others here who might have a need to use their rotary table for more than just a few holes.



    Last edited by RSG; 06-20-2022, 08:53 AM.
    Ontario, Canada

  • #2
    Doing a trial run with magic markers
    s a great idea.
    Nice setup you have there.
    I like your chuck centering ring.
    Might have to steal that idea.
    Nice table with tilt.
    I don't have a tilting table,
    but I have an Advance brand table
    with a 16"x16" X-Y slide built in to
    the top of it. Very handy to clock
    things to center. The sucker is very
    heavy though. Crane or die lift table
    territory for sure.

    -D
    Last edited by Doozer; 06-20-2022, 09:13 AM.
    DZER

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    • #3
      I've got an 11" Advance, very nice tables. But even mine is probably approaching 300 pounds. Definitely not light. I've been keeping an eye out for one of those tilting rotaries. Walter makes a nice one.

      And yep, marker is a good idea. I write notes or DRO coordinates all over the place when I'm working. Part, vise, rotary, wherever. Comes right off with a dab of acetone.

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      • #4
        Thanks for the tips RSG, if you get a chance would like to see some pics of your fishing reels.
        Larry

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        • #5
          A nice idea! I'm going to keep this in mind for some future RT work. So far I've avoided the sort of detail work you're doing. But even for simpler items it would be a nice trick to confirm ones thoughts in ink before milling chips.
          Chilliwack BC, Canada

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          • #6
            Cool. I too make reels, though primarily multipliers, large and small, and spend a lot of time doing heavily timevested tricks on the rotab.
            A good trick goes a long way.

            .

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            • #7
              Good tip and that is a wicked looking part you were making there.
              Paul A.
              SE Texas

              And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
              You will find that it has discrete steps.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Doozer View Post
                D
                I like your chuck centering ring.
                Might have to steal that idea.

                -D

                LOL you noticed that eh! Go right ahead 😉

                At first the intention was to make it easy to swap chucks but after buying three 5" chucks with removable jaws from Shars I found them all to be exactly the same internally regarding the scroll. So, now I leave that one chuck body on the rotab and just pull the jaws and swap them out. I then only need to loosen the plate and reconfirm alignment. After inspecting other chucks I am of the notion that they are all made from the same plant in China as they are identical in dimension.
                Ontario, Canada

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by eKretz View Post
                  But even mine is probably approaching 300 pounds. Definitely not light.
                  LOL, that little 8" tilting table of mine weighs 175 lbs so lifting it is not an option. I built an electric hoist to lift and swing it onto the table.
                  Ontario, Canada

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by metalfixer View Post
                    Thanks for the tips RSG, if you get a chance would like to see some pics of your fishing reels.
                    Larry

                    Sure, the easiest way to see them is to go to my website.

                    www.rsgcustomreels.com

                    Ontario, Canada

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                    • #11
                      Thanks, RSG,
                      Link indicates "website under development"
                      Larry

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I see that there's a problem with the link so here's some pics of the recent reels I've been working on in varying levels of completion. Still a looooong way to go with finishing and anodising though.













                        Ontario, Canada

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by RSG View Post

                          LOL, that little 8" tilting table of mine weighs 175 lbs so lifting it is not an option. I built an electric hoist to lift and swing it onto the table.
                          Who is the maker of that one? Do you like it?

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by eKretz View Post

                            Who is the maker of that one? Do you like it?
                            Phase II and yes it's excellent quality.
                            Ontario, Canada

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by RSG View Post

                              Phase II and yes it's excellent quality.
                              I have a couple Yuasa items and have used a few Phase II items, I've never found them to be of poor quality. Neat looking reel faces. Do you need to do a lot of hand blending on those?

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