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Thermal Friction Hot Melt Short Drill Bit Solid Carbide Hole Making Tool

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Doozer View Post
    I would rather slam my dick in the door of my car
    than use one of those ridiculous things.
    Someone ought to have their head examined.

    -D
    That has got to hurt
    would it not be better than just not purchase?

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    • #17
      Yes I have used one meant for an M8 thread tap to go in. Both the Flowdrill brand and the Chinese knock offs, both work equally well.

      No, a cordless drill is a no go, fast enough, but not enough pressure, HP etc



      They make special holders that have an aluminum cooling ring shrank on them to keep the heat generated from creeping into the spindle bearings.
      I used a Bridgeportmill and an R-8 to ER25 collet chuck and since I wasn't drilling that many holes, I didn't have any trouble with heat.

      They make a special lubricant, which isn't cheap, but is needed to keep material from sticking to the carbide surface. Luckily a little bit goes a long way. I've heard that diaper rash cream is supposed to be a cheap substitute, but haven't tried it.



      The best taps to use are forming taps designed for the material you are drilling. I used mine to do about 50 holes in some 2x2x11gauge steel tubing. They did the job and I ended up with a result that is much better than a rivnut ( there is no collar stick proud of the surface and no chance of them breaking loose in the hole and spinning) The process is also quicker.
      I just need one more tool,just one!

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Doozer View Post
        I would rather slam my dick in the door of my car
        than use one of those ridiculous things.
        Someone ought to have their head examined.

        -D
        Good idea, all of it.

        Comment


        • #19
          I sincerely doubt you'd have the ability to make one of these work well with a hand drill or any sort of home gamer equipment.

          Source: 3/8-16 "standard" flow drill product page states you need 2hp and 2000 RPM to make it work. You're not gonna pull that off with an 18V Makita...

          https://www.flowdrill.com/usa_en/flo...-long-standard Click image for larger version

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          -paul

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          • #20
            Originally posted by wierdscience View Post
            Yes I have used one meant for an M8 thread tap to go in. Both the Flowdrill brand and the Chinese knock offs, both work equally well.

            No, a cordless drill is a no go, fast enough, but not enough pressure, HP etc



            They make special holders that have an aluminum cooling ring shrank on them to keep the heat generated from creeping into the spindle bearings.
            I used a Bridgeportmill and an R-8 to ER25 collet chuck and since I wasn't drilling that many holes, I didn't have any trouble with heat.

            They make a special lubricant, which isn't cheap, but is needed to keep material from sticking to the carbide surface. Luckily a little bit goes a long way. I've heard that diaper rash cream is supposed to be a cheap substitute, but haven't tried it.



            The best taps to use are forming taps designed for the material you are drilling. I used mine to do about 50 holes in some 2x2x11gauge steel tubing. They did the job and I ended up with a result that is much better than a rivnut ( there is no collar stick proud of the surface and no chance of them breaking loose in the hole and spinning) The process is also quicker.
            Thanks for that
            I may just have to give it a try...I know my drill press will generate enough speed and force...
            Paul

            Comment


            • #21
              A simple way for longer thread engagement on thin sheet metal is to use a form tap with a smaller than recommended tap drill. In soft sheet metal the form tap extrudes the extra material out the other side of the hole giving at least twice the material thickness of thread engagement.

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by Mark Rand View Post
                I did, on one occasion, hit a bit of rebar with a carbide tipped masonry drill. I tried to bull through it and was rather shocked when I pulled the drill out of the hole and the carbide insert fell off. The braze had melted!
                I will often times get angry and run the hammer drill until the tip comes out red hot if I manage to hit rebar or the odd piece of ultra hard aggregate. I have the worst luck with masonry bits. Or maybe my aim is just too good?
                -paul

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by DR View Post
                  A simple way for longer thread engagement on thin sheet metal is to use a form tap with a smaller than recommended tap drill. In soft sheet metal the form tap extrudes the extra material out the other side of the hole giving at least twice the material thickness of thread engagement.
                  Does that work reliably? There is another process known as extruded threads which uses some kind of punch with excessive clearance but doesn't heat the material red hot so you get more thread engagement.
                  -paul

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