Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Part made on my CNC mill

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Part made on my CNC mill

    I tipped over a fan in my bedroom a while back. The part that holds the motor to the stand broke. So I went into Fusion and modeled the part and programmed it in CAM and like magic I had a better than new thingamajig to get the fan back in action. I had help from a man in USA with the CAM programming. We did a Zoom meeting and he guided me through the best way to program the toolpaths. That was a huge help to me and gave me the confidence that I was using the CAM efficiently. The part took an hour to mill. I was being conservative on my feeds and speeds. Click image for larger version

Name:	fan bracket 1.jpg
Views:	415
Size:	507.7 KB
ID:	2009487
    Location: The Black Forest in Germany

    How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

  • #2
    Pretty nice for a first part!
    Did you use a ball EM on the curved neck?

    Sid

    Comment


    • #3
      Looks excellent.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by sid pileski View Post
        Pretty nice for a first part!
        Did you use a ball EM on the curved neck?

        Sid
        I roughed it with an 8mm flat endmill and finished it with a 6mm ball nose.
        Location: The Black Forest in Germany

        How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Bented View Post
          Looks excellent.
          Thanks. It was like magic to me!
          Location: The Black Forest in Germany

          How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

          Comment


          • #6
            If you do not have to make time on each part decrease the stepover.
            This will leave fewer visible tooling marks but increase the cycle time by a great amount.

            For some time is unimportant.

            Last edited by Bented; 07-21-2022, 07:38 PM.

            Comment


            • #7
              Impressive first CNC part. Looks like a job well done!

              IMO Don't get so hung up on reducing cycle time right away. Focus more on producing cycles that leave nice finishes, and ones that don't eat up tooling. It's easier and cheaper to whittle cycle time from that direction, than trying to add quality, and reduce tooling costs from the other way. Especially in the home shop environment.

              Comment


              • #8
                You just opened up a new world of possibilities and capabilities.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I think it would be interesting and informative to many for you to describe the process from manual to CNC conversion.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    BlackForest---I am happy for you. You learned something new, had fun doing it, and created something beautiful. That doesn't happen often enough in our lives. I'm proud for you.---Brian
                    Brian Rupnow
                    Design engineer
                    Barrie, Ontario, Canada

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Ooof - I keep trying to get into solid modeling -> cam... But I really am not doing that complicated of work.. I can can usually create a gcode file in a few minutes for most things.. Now with turning cycles and my working more on some lathe work - G60/61 turning cycles make profile creation pretty easy.

                      I want to do more cad cam though.. but Squirrel!!!

                      Great work! It is magical how you can create something from nothing quite painlessly.... It never gets old.

                      sam

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Well done sir, and no broken tool, I’m impressed, first go I had did not go well, found out why there are interlocking doors round a mill, end mill turned into a bullet.
                        not only did you make the machine that made the part you made a part of a machine, winner
                        now you need a furnace and some moulds to cast stock I reckon, especially with the price of a billot stock, oh I used the b word ( accurately btw)
                        well fabricobbled.
                        ( she who must be obeyed sends her regards to the nice man in Germany, you have a fan)
                        mark

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by boslab View Post
                          Well done sir, and no broken tool, I’m impressed, first go I had did not go well, found out why there are interlocking doors round a mill, end mill turned into a bullet.
                          not only did you make the machine that made the part you made a part of a machine, winner
                          now you need a furnace and some moulds to cast stock I reckon, especially with the price of a billot stock, oh I used the b word ( accurately btw)
                          well fabricobbled.
                          ( she who must be obeyed sends her regards to the nice man in Germany, you have a fan)
                          mark
                          Thank you Mark. I did break a endmill today trying to face off the bottom of the part. Luckily the end that broke lodged itself in the part. My shop looks like it snowed in there. Alu chips eveywhere in everything. I will have to at least put up some welding curtains to contain the carnage to a small area.

                          Please tell your better half I said hello.
                          Location: The Black Forest in Germany

                          How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Nice work BF. If I were 20 years younger, I would try going the CNC route as you have done.
                            “I know lots of people who are educated far beyond their intelligence”

                            Lewis Grizzard

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I am writing an article for a sailing magazine about CNC and old boats featuring the huge number of parts I’ve made for my saiboat.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X