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Part made on my CNC mill

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Dave C View Post
    Nice work BF. If I were 20 years younger, I would try going the CNC route as you have done.
    I don't know how old you are Dave. I turned 70 this year. No spring chick for sure. By far the CAM side is much easier to learn than the modeling side. I am no expert on the modeling side and a rank beginner on the CAM side.
    Location: The Black Forest in Germany

    How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Black Forest View Post
      I tipped over a fan in my bedroom a while back.
      That is always where it starts, at home. Falling over, as we get older. My balance is crap.

      What is cool is we all can make what we break. JR

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      • #18
        Nice job on the part BF.

        It’s funny…From ‘87 to ‘03 I did CAD/CAM and CNC machining in job shops. Rapid turnaround, super stress related high end muti-axis jobs.

        When I lost a 4th job in 3 years to offshore/China moves ( Right after I saved them Thousands by revamping a long running, oft repeated, Swiss Turning routine.) the TWC lady walked me down the unemployment office hall to the local oil refinery hiring session and I was one of 20 hired out of 1600 applicants. To work outside in the process units. So different, so much to learn just to keep from killing myself and others.

        I haven’t done a program since ‘04. My little CNC Sherline collects dust and I only reference Acad or Cadkey when I absolutely need to.
        My shop is manual and will probably stay that way. That door has long since closed.


        I salute you digital guys.
        Illigitimi non Carborundum 😎
        9X49 Birmingham Mill, Reid Model 2C Grinder, 13x40 ENCO GH Lathe, 6X18 Craftsman lathe, Sherline CNC mill, Eastwood TIG200 AC/DC and lots of stuff from 30+ years in the trade and 15.5 in refinery unit operations. Now retired. El Paso, TX

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Black Forest View Post

          I don't know how old you are Dave. I turned 70 this year. No spring chick for sure. By far the CAM side is much easier to learn than the modeling side. I am no expert on the modeling side and a rank beginner on the CAM side.
          81 last April, already past the national average life expectancy. Fortunately, longevity is prevalent on both sides of the family, so I should have a few years left. Dad made it to 95 but his last few years were spent battling dementia.
          “I know lots of people who are educated far beyond their intelligence”

          Lewis Grizzard

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Tim The Grim View Post
            I haven’t done a program since ‘04. My little CNC Sherline collects dust ... That door has long since closed.
            As long as the door hasn't been nailed and barricaded shut, there remains an opportunity to reopen it.

            G-code is still G-code, but a LOT has changed since '04 with respect to how the G-code is generated. Not to mention the knowledge base and variety of mediums through which this is available to be drawn upon.

            When time (and humility) permits, I encourage dabbling.

            With open eyes & ears, along with the willingness to ask questions and chuckle at inadvertent bobbles, great things can happen.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Black Forest View Post

              I don't know how old you are Dave. I turned 70 this year. No spring chick for sure. By far the CAM side is much easier to learn than the modeling side. I am no expert on the modeling side and a rank beginner on tCAM side.
              You made it happen.

              This is all that matters, make it happen in real time.

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              • #22
                My neighbor came to me yesterday for me to drill a hole in a piece of 50mm square tubing with 5mm thick wall. The hole needed to be a through hole 40mm diameter. I don't have a 40mm drill so what does any self respecting guy with a CNC mill do? Yep I threw it on the drill press and drilled a 16mm through the two sides of the tubing. Then plopped in in the vise on the mill with the 16mm drill mounted in the spindle and located the hole with the drill to get my part zero. Opened up the conversational section on the Centroid Acorn software and in two minutes had the circular pocket programmed to bore it out to 40mm. I used the 8mm end mill to touch off on the tube to get my Z height and I was off to the races. I only bored the one side and then flipped the part to do the other side using the 16mm drill again to locate my X and Y part zero. Slam bam thank you Ma'm. Done. My neighbor stood there in wonder and I was having a great time also. Funny how the simple things can be so satisfying.
                Location: The Black Forest in Germany

                How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

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                • #23
                  Yep - that's what you do when you have CNC. YAY!!!
                  Kansas City area

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                  • #24
                    Interpolating whatever size holes you want is one of the most under rated benefits of CNC.

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