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Are you a Job shop, Production shop or a Retired shop? Curious minds want to know.

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  • Are you a Job shop, Production shop or a Retired shop? Curious minds want to know.

    Just kidding, curious minds have better things to think about.

    I think I am a Job shop leaning retired.

    What say you? JR

  • #2
    Yes
    I just need one more tool,just one!

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    • #3
      I'm mostly disabled these days, can't do a full day anymore. In my own shop I tinker for fun and a few extra dollars, also repairing things around the house and small modification projects. I do what little I can part time in a job shop as a supervisor and doing some training/teaching.

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      • #4
        No option for home hobby shop?
        Mike
        WI/IL border, USA

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        • #5
          Part job, trying to get away from some of that, heading toward full-time (if admittedly small scale) production.

          Doc.
          Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

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          • #6
            Originally posted by MichaelP View Post
            No option for home hobby shop?
            Which is surprising for a site which from its title claims to be for home shop machinists.
            'It may not always be the best policy to do what is best technically, but those responsible for policy can never form a right judgement without knowledge of what is right technically' - 'Dutch' Kindelberger

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            • #7
              Hobbyist at home, R&D shop at work. Putting hours into one with the hope that it'll pay off and fund the other eventually.
              -paul

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              • #8
                hobbyist at home, maintenance shop at work. Hoping to turn the home shop into a business at retirement age. -- in about 10 yrs.
                25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by JRouche View Post
                  Just kidding, curious minds have better things to think about.

                  I think I am a Job shop leaning retired.

                  What say you? JR
                  You're a job shop? https://www.isecorp.com/machining-in...shop-industry/
                  Have you ever made a part for a "customer" and charged real money for it, not said, " Here just take it and drop off a bottle of Johnny Walker Red."

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                  • #10
                    I’m a, “I do what ever I want, whenever I want” shop. Those other options don’t sound as fun! Waiting to retire sounds like a horrible way to waste your life away.

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                    • #11
                      Hobby shop.. As dad always says.. Some people have boats..

                      sam

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                      • #12
                        I'm partly job shop, partly R&D (prototypes of new inventions), partly short run production, partly maintenance and repair for other companies, partly hobby shop. As a tool & die maker of 45+ years, went through Boeing and Cessna Tool & Die schools in Wichita, KS, worked in the aircraft industry for several years, I can make just about anything, and have a small, but well equipped home shop to do it in. I mostly do whatever work comes in the door to pay the bills. Sometimes I do projects for myself just because I can.
                        Last edited by Toolguy; 07-25-2022, 11:00 AM.
                        Kansas City area

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                        • #13
                          Publishing status may not be a great idea...... if you happen to be doing paying jobs in your "home shop", then insurance may turn out to be non-existent on the basis that you should have had business insurance, but only had homeowner's.

                          Someone will for sure look for any possible reason to avoid paying any significant claim you make. That is what insurance companies do these days. Documenting it on the web is about like posting video of the robbery you commit on facebook.

                          Even if you never do any outside work, simple possession of "industrial machinery" may cause an initial denial, with you having to get lawyers involved to get the insurance payment you are entitled to. It could be considered to be proof of doing production work, leaving you to "prove the negative".

                          Yeah, I know, I'm being "that guy". OK, hopefully you never have the problem in the first place.
                          CNC machines only go through the motions

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                            Yeah, I know, I'm being "that guy". OK, hopefully you never have the problem in the first place.
                            The "naysayer", yes aptly so.
                            Since you've outed yourself in older posts, I'm sure you are well armored with a business license, EIN, etc., etc.
                            IRS rules defining the difference between a business and a hobby that makes occasional money are quite clear and a good defense, against an attempt to deny a claim.

                            Insurance tried to deny a claim for the loss of about 100+ board feet of hardwood lumber that got wet when my parents steam boiler split open. Their adjuster's insistence, "No home woodworker would have such a large amount of lumber/" The demand, "Show me the language in the policy that states such a restriction or limit. Adjust signed off and even paid to have the wood removed, kiln dried and returned.

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                            • #15
                              My farm shop has a large variety of uses,mainly farm repairs.We’re blessed with fairly long and cold winters so parking semi truck inside while grain hauling is happening is common.I like doing R&D with shop or agriculture related machines,have hosted golf tournaments in shop during the winter months for Seed Customers.

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