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Are you a Job shop, Production shop or a Retired shop? Curious minds want to know.

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  • #16
    My hobby shop supports other hobbies I'm afflicted with.
    Parts for cars. Parts for tractor. Parts for backhoe.
    Parts to make parts for musical instruments.
    Parts of the house, shed, barn, etc...
    Tools to fix above.
    Once in a long while I'll make something to take into work,
    but I never tell anyone (except you guys) about it.

    Sometimes I turn things on the lathe purely for therapy.

    t
    rusting in Seattle

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    • #17
      I am retired and only have a little 7x12 lathe at home. As a volunteer at the Helicopter museum in Somerset, UK, I use the Smart & Brown model A , the Taiwanese round column mill and the Tom Senior light vertical mill, plus a drill press, and some sheet metal tools along with Mike, Rod and Alan. Parts and tools needed for restoration get made and I also like to improve the machines, the Tom senior is currently getting a new knee nut and an adjustable backlash Y nut is also underway, the main column has been raised by 25mm for a little more Z height.

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      • #18
        I retired once from my original job at a large maintenance shop for a big aluminum smelter and rolling mills. Spent 30 years there, including my 4 year apprenticeship. Took early retirement at 53 and then started my own small (one man) shop. Stayed busy for about 20 years, then retired again. Now do a few little jobs if someone runs me down and corners me. Like others, at 81 years of age, mostly just putter for my self and honey do's. Over the years as a young man, worked for a few years, as an auto and truck mechanic, then worked for a couple of years as an industrial mainenance mechanic. This was before getting into the machinist apprenticeship. Now, most mornings, just swap lies with other old farts at a coffee shop, then naps and lawn mowing keeps me occupied.
        Sarge41
        (If you are wondering where the Sarge nickname came from, I did 6 years in the Indiana National Guard as a Recovery Sergeant.)

        To answer the O.P's original query, i guess it's a retired shop.
        Last edited by sarge41; 07-24-2022, 09:43 PM.

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        • #19
          Retired from Northrop 2 years ago. Been a mold maker / press die, and sheet metal guy. 50 years in the biss. Last project was JWST telescope. Now it's my favorite radio station and coffee in the garage. Small lathe and mill, but still gets my work done. Probably could make money with these Chi-com machines, but not interested. Had a mold making company back in 1980. What a skillful dying business that has become. Now its bantering on HSM ......lol. 👀
          Last edited by Fasturn; 07-24-2022, 05:01 PM.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by MichaelP View Post
            No option for home hobby shop?
            Ooops. I was being a lil too introspective. I am retired so I just translated that to Hobby Shop which is what I am. I overlooked the definition.. Yes!! Hobby Shop (Retired shop) is what I meant. Thanks, JR

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            • #21
              Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post

              You're a job shop? https://www.isecorp.com/machining-in...shop-industry/
              Have you ever made a part for a "customer" and charged real money for it, not said, " Here just take it and drop off a bottle of Johnny Walker Red."
              By that definition no. Have I worked in a job shop? Yes, not my own. I do not charge folks for the infrequent fixing or welding. I just say bring it over and Ill look at it. The ol friends and family deal. Why did I say I am a job shop leaning retired? Cause, if someone brings me a job Ill look at it and deal with it if I can.. I dont do much of that anymore do to the labor of it all. Hence the retired part... JR

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Tundra Twin Track View Post
                ...have hosted golf tournaments in shop during the winter months...
                That's funny. But I guess when your shop has an 80 foot lift-up hangar door on one end you might have enough room
                for a (mini) golf tournament.

                My brother and I ran a jobbing shop (welding, fabrication, machining and repairs) for the better part of 50 years. My
                brother phased himself out over the last year and a half and early in June of this year I down-sized from the 2200
                square feet we had been in to 300 square feet in a customers shop. Had to get rid of a lot of stuff but I'm left with
                my 3200 lb. 13x40 lathe, a nice Taiwanese mill and all of my tooling and measuring equipment. I kept a lot of stock
                and other junk which I probably don't need but so far it's fitting nicely in the space I have.

                I guess you cold say that I'm semi-retired now. I still intend to do some paying work but my overhead is so low that
                I can be choosy about what I do and when I do it. I won't have to hit the shop every day just to pay the bills and I'll
                have lots of time to tinker on my own projects...

                Keith
                __________________________
                Just one project too many--that's what finally got him...

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                • #23
                  My signature says it all, and by my count I am in my 5th Act: Freelance Technical Writer & Engineering Management Consultant.
                  Avid Amateur Home Shop Machinist, Electronics Enthusiast, Chef, Indoorsman. Self-Proclaimed (Dabbler? Dilettante?) Renaissance (old) Man.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post

                    The "naysayer", yes aptly so.
                    Since you've outed yourself in older posts, I'm sure you are well armored with a business license, EIN, etc., etc.
                    IRS rules defining the difference between a business and a hobby that makes occasional money are quite clear and a good defense, against an attempt to deny a claim.

                    Insurance tried to deny a claim for the loss of about 100+ board feet of hardwood lumber that got wet when my parents steam boiler split open. Their adjuster's insistence, "No home woodworker would have such a large amount of lumber/" The demand, "Show me the language in the policy that states such a restriction or limit. Adjust signed off and even paid to have the wood removed, kiln dried and returned.
                    Thank you for confirming that the INSco pulled exactly the sort of thing that I mentioned, on you.

                    Just as I said, they "tried it on", hoping you would give up. They might have done it anyway, but we cannot know that. All we know is your statement that the insurance actually DID try to classify you as a "business" and deny the claim.

                    As you point out, IRS would not allow me to claim it as a business, since it has not "made net money" in any 5 year period, let alone in the last 5. That does NOT mean that the INSco would not "try it on", and deny the claim. After all, they tried it out on you.

                    For 100 board feet? Really? That is not so much. If you had had 500, well, I can see that, maybe. But you could have gotten a good deal, and might have had that pile for 4 years already.

                    A "job shop" operating from home, would have advertising (possibly), and certainly a steady stream of business. So not too great to call yourself a job shop unless you ARE a business.
                    CNC machines only go through the motions.

                    Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
                    Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
                    Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
                    I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
                    Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                      ...........................
                      For 100 board feet? Really? That is not so much. If you had had 500, well, I can see that, maybe. But you could have gotten a good deal, and might have had that pile for 4 years already.

                      A "job shop" operating from home, would have advertising (possibly), and certainly a steady stream of business. So not too great to call yourself a job shop unless you ARE a business.
                      100 board feet is what a hobby woodworker might have in the shop, or maybe a whole lot more, it's really nothing. I think he may have balked at paying any claim for clear hardwood. He made no claim of operating a business, just disbelief..

                      I've had people approach me with work while working on a freelance job. I've also had calls which start out something like, "Pete told me you can..."
                      I can't imagine anyone trying to net a little fish.

                      "So not too great to call yourself a job shop unless you ARE a business.", not sure what you are trying to infer.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post

                        ....................................
                        I can't imagine anyone trying to net a little fish.
                        ....................
                        They don't. But when the claim "lands in the boat", they are likely not to throw it back..... You should know that, they did it to you.

                        As for not claiming you were a business, what did you suppose he meant by "so much wood" ? It seems obvious. Hobby = not much wood (to him). Lots of wood (by his lights) means maybe a business.

                        The comment about "not calling yourself a job shop" is too clear and obvious to require ANY explanation.
                        CNC machines only go through the motions.

                        Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
                        Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
                        Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
                        I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
                        Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          I'm a retired chemist who always enjoyed the time he spent in the machine shop making gizmos to do chemistry. I make silly stuff for my own enjoyment. Every now and then a neighbor asks me to help with some part... so I make stuff for them.

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                          • #28
                            well over 30 years ago I used my home shop for a very unusual application, I made patent models
                            it was a very interesting experience , not rewarding, but interesting. I didn't charge the inventor, but took a piece of the action ( Like 1 or 2 %)
                            So one guy wanted a wine bottle cap made , which I did with improvements for functionality and he insisted he pay me , which he did -a few hundred dollars
                            Guess what, "That" idea was a blockbuster, but I had no idea of the market.. how about this one , a Engineering friend created a new way of making plastic pipe
                            and that idea was patented and I thought I would be in hog heaven . To this day no one makes pipes with his idea, and here is the kicker- his pipe use 1/2 the material
                            and are 8 times stronger. But here is the reason why --try to change - industry standards- government standards -international standards. State and Federal law.
                            I lost my shirt on that deal 500+ hours no one was willing to invest millions into that ordeal
                            So you can have a great idea, but it will never go anywhere.

                            I have to say I met my share of perpetual motion guys and those conversations did not last long

                            Rich
                            Green Bay, WI

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by LKeithR View Post

                              That's funny. But I guess when your shop has an 80 foot lift-up hangar door on one end you might have enough room
                              for a (mini) golf tournament.


                              The Hyd Door is 40’x18’,had a few get togethers and everyone had a blast.Only putters allowed,no drivers you know how boys can be lol!

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by reggie_obe View Post

                                You're a job shop? https://www.isecorp.com/machining-in...shop-industry/
                                Have you ever made a part for a "customer" and charged real money for it, not said, " Here just take it and drop off a bottle of Johnny Walker Red."
                                I dont know. I try to be nice. Some times I just dont get it.

                                Why? You seem to like to follow me around this site and comment. Yes. I still copy this entire web site, it takes TBs, in multitudes. Its all documented.

                                I dont know you from beans. Please stop covering me and posting about me.

                                Only if I am that disinteresting. Thats all. I mean no harm. JR

                                Edit: The Job Shop was a friend of mine's. He was my teacher per-say. He taught me everything I know in RE: machining and more importantly Lathe work. JR

                                I said work. Not for money, for free. He had three lathes, one vertical lathe of about 48". A B&S horizontal. One skinny bridge port. No CNC crap. 300 ton press, the ram was two feet in diameter. Big press in a very small shop. Welding space, ok table, not so much a space lol Small shop.

                                Learned how to fire flame some build up on shafts. Powder welding. Fixed his south bend 13" Fixed alot of his stuff actually now that I think about it. All of it except for one. The Prentice (money maker).. The only break we had was the 10hp motor. The motor starter was the culprit.

                                Yeah, I worked in a job shop for about five years until the Machinist died. So yeah, that was not a paying Job, it was a M-F for me. I still miss the guy... JR

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