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Are you a Job shop, Production shop or a Retired shop? Curious minds want to know.

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  • #31
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ID:	2009946 I had my own (one man shop) that did mostly prototyping, tooling, and fixturing. I pretty much closed down after my main customer was bought out by BAE Systems. I think they thought I was too small to do any work for them. I officially retired and kept my shop pretty much the same except for selling off a few tools and scrapping a couple of HC lathes. I'm still downsizing, but intend to keep at least one lathe and my Bridgeport until I can no longer work in the shop. I use my shop in support of my other hobbies such as restoring antique Salsbury scooters and ham radio related stuff. I can't stand as long as I used to, nor walk as far; but I keep putting one foot in front of the other.
    Last edited by Jim Caudill; 07-25-2022, 01:58 AM.
    JHC Dayton, OH

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    • #32
      Originally posted by sarge41 View Post
      I retired This was before getting into the machinist apprenticeship. Now, most mornings, just swap lies with other old farts at a coffee shop, then naps and lawn mowing keeps me occupied.
      Sarge41
      (If you are wondering where the Sarge nickname came from, I did 6 years in the Indiana National Guard as a Recovery Sergeant.)

      To answer the O.P's original query, i guess it's a retired shop.
      Yeah, I guess I am the O,P. Thanks Sarge. You do good work Mr. Yeah, Id salute you.

      (I dont want to back in the brig, I have only been there once) So yeah, hi Sarge :

      Nope, Kidding.

      The National Guard.. I salute you. JR

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      • #33
        Production for decades with cabinet/millwork....

        Job for the machine shop....

        Auto/MC shop ain't no slouch..


        Retirement is seeing some slight tangents,but overall things haven't changed too much. Spending very quality time organizing,and spearheading restoration efforts on my 4 grown boys homes. Youngest just bought a 1910 four square. It's in a historic district,him and his darling wife are setting new stds as far as I'm concerned with resources. He's a history teacher at a $$ boys school and she's a hard charging entrepreneur.

        Number 2 son is restoring a lovely,quite sprawling '47 estate house. Slate hip roof amongst other cool amenities.

        Number 1 has an 1850's house that needs some attention.

        Number 3 has a stupid $$$ '91 that is at a turning point. Great period,a high node of sorts.... pre OSB,has hardwood floors,and quality brick construction. Original plumbing is on the bubble.

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        • #34
          What shop?
          I dunno what you are talking about.
          I'm a lawyer.

          -D
          DZER

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          • #35
            Originally posted by Jim Caudill View Post
            Click image for larger version

Name:	plain city.jpg
Views:	210
Size:	114.2 KB
ID:	2009946 I had my own (one man shop) that did mostly prototyping, tooling, and fixturing. I pretty much closed down after my main customer was bought out by BAE Systems. I think they thought I was too small to do any work for them. I officially retired and kept my shop pretty much the same except for selling off a few tools and scrapping a couple of HC lathes. I'm still downsizing, but intend to keep at least one lathe and my Bridgeport until I can no longer work in the shop. I use my shop in support of my other hobbies such as restoring antique Salsbury scooters and ham radio related stuff. I can't stand as long as I used to, nor walk as far; but I keep putting one foot in front of the other.
            Jim
            How awesome to see your post ! For you youngsters, Jim was a frequent knowledgeable poster back in the MetalWeb News days ( turn of the century ) when passwords were only a few numbers and threads had no graphics as we see today , and looked like a continuous letter with additions
            Glad to see the shop still a part of your life Jim and welcome back
            Rich
            Green Bay, WI

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            • #36
              I am totally a hobby shop. I've tried a little bit of working for others in my shop, but didn't really enjoy it. I still do the odd engineering drawing for some of my long time customers, but that just makes enough money to pay for my hobby.---Brian
              Brian Rupnow
              Design engineer
              Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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              • #37
                My shop is to support my other hobbies. I like coming up with ideas and seeing them to final product. One day I might even come up with a marketable one lol. I also take on some outside work occasionally, if it interests me, and pays well.

                I haven't been in my shop to do work in over 2 months though, and right now there is a pile of garbage bags stacked up in the main isle of my shop that contain a bunch of fleeces waiting to be processed, so I can't even go out there if I wanted to. I think my Wife is taking them in next week, so I'll at least be able to walk out there again lol. The summer sports schedule is winding down too, so I'll start having time for it again.

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                • #38
                  Recovering job shop owner. After 20 years out of the trade I am rediscovering the joys of machining, that which brought me to it in the first place. I went to school to learn machining for my own purposes. I never wanted to work as a machinist, I CERTAINLY NEVER wanted to own a shop. When I finally left the business, I was so depressed I was having panic attacks on the way to work. There's not much worse than hating your job when you own the business. Now I can't wait to get out in the shop and make some chips. No partner, no employees, no customers. Just me, the machines and the material. It's heaven!
                  It's all mind over matter.
                  If you don't mind, it don't matter.

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                  • #39
                    I have a home woodworking job shop specializing in the repair of violin-family stringed instruments and their bows. I also buy instruments and bows to restore and sell. It's mostly hand work based on 18th Century technology, but I also have a band saw, table saw, drill press, disc/belt sander and grinder. For machine tools, I have a South Bend 9A and a Taiwanese benchtop drill/mill that I occasionally use for bow work, tool making and general messing around. I have been semi-retired since 1976.
                    Last edited by fiddle fixer; 07-26-2022, 08:58 AM.

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                    • #40
                      Mine is a hobby shop (machining for the sake of machining). But now, in my retirement, it is also a source for some extra income via sales of restored items and also the occasional article that I write. I enjoy both activities.
                      Paul A.
                      SE Texas

                      And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                      You will find that it has discrete steps.

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                      • #41
                        Retired fabricator, EE, shipfitter, BBQ builder. Now I don't work for money other than the small revenue I get from buying and selling things. In my shop I mainly restore machine tools.

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by fiddle fixer View Post
                          I have a home woodworking job shop specializing in the repair of violin-family stringed instruments and their bows. I also buy instruments and bows to restore and sell. It's mostly hand work based on 18th Century technology, but I also have a band saw, table saw, drill press, disc/belt sander and grinder. For machine tools, I have a South Bend 9A and a Taiwanese benchtop drill/mill that I occasionally use for bow work, tool making and general messing around. I have been semi-retired since 1976.
                          Very cool. There is a member here, Frank Ford that is a top of the line guitar person and machinist. I havent seen him post lately, I hope all is well..
                          His site
                          http://www.frets.com/FretsPages/pagelist.html JR

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                          • #43
                            Not a job shop, but….
                            i made my Big Nickel and so don’t have to work. My fabrication, machine shop woodshop was to support my 135 year old sailing ship and my 116 year old tug boat. Those vessels went away. Because i am a creative sort and hate twiddling my thumbs, i developed a couple of product lines that keeps me busy and enjoyably so. Oh and building the odd cannon
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                            • #44
                              I have been retired for three years and made my hobby shop my full time gig! By full time gig I mean hobby projects I sell on a casual bases. So I work when I want, not all day every day.
                              Ontario, Canada

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