Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Anyone have a schematic for an old Sharp 1660C lathe?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
    He said a "proper" E-stop. That's NOT one that the manual start button can bypass.

    A "real" E-stop should shut down the machine regardless of how the controls are set, or even if they are messed up.
    As far as I can tell, all safetys and the E-stop kill power by triggering the contactor to break power. Someone suggested physically disabling the contactor to stay on to eliminate all safetys.

    I never believe in rigged solutions unless it's to limp a vehicle into a building, etc. My repairs are permanent and clean or they wait until they can be.

    Comment


    • #32
      E-stops go all the way on up to being a "disconnect" upstream of anything. There isn't just one kind.
      CNC machines only go through the motions.

      Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
      Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
      Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
      I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
      Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

      Comment


      • #33
        Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
        E-stops go all the way on up to being a "disconnect" upstream of anything. There isn't just one kind.
        We had LOTO (lock-ou, tag-out) at the factory I worked at where I was required to put my assigned padlock on a physical switch to disable everything while I was inside a cell servicing equipment. We didn't refer to those switched as "E-stops". An E-stop is a panic button in plain sight that you hit to shut everything down in a hurry. Usually when you see someone get their hand caught in something moving or something like that.

        I wouldn't call the lockable kill switch on the panel an E-stop because it's not something you could just hammer to kill all power.

        Comment


        • #34
          Good job Fear,
          finding that bungled wire.
          Most times, that is really what it takes.
          No real need for a schematic.
          Just look for something out of the ordinary.
          Happy you found it.
          I bet you make your next diagnosis in half the time.

          ---Doozer
          DZER

          Comment


          • #35
            Originally posted by Fear View Post

            We had LOTO (lock-ou, tag-out) at the factory I worked at where I was required to put my assigned padlock on a physical switch to disable everything while I was inside a cell servicing equipment. We didn't refer to those switched as "E-stops". An E-stop is a panic button in plain sight that you hit to shut everything down in a hurry. Usually when you see someone get their hand caught in something moving or something like that.

            I wouldn't call the lockable kill switch on the panel an E-stop because it's not something you could just hammer to kill all power.
            I'm talking about switches you can just hit to shut down. Red button and all.
            CNC machines only go through the motions.

            Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
            Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
            Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
            I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
            Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

            Comment


            • #36
              Originally posted by J Tiers View Post

              I'm talking about switches you can just hit to shut down. Red button and all.
              Yes, it kills the control power, but if you have a manual bypass jammed in with a stick its defeated. Thats why the lock out tag out on the main power disconnect is required, not control power but 3 phase or whatever powers the machine. Or depending on the layout of the machines, a lockable work switch within sight of the motor or other that kills the 3 phase or single phase power.

              When I first logged in here 20 years ago you were a sound or communications tech, now your a EE that designs solar and VFD systems and everything else. Congratulations.
              Last edited by wmgeorge; 07-30-2022, 06:08 PM.
              Retired - Journeyman Refrigeration Pipefitter - Master Electrician

              Comment


              • #37
                Thanks everyone for the input. The lathe is finally up so that's one more step to having the shop going.

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by Fear View Post
                  Thanks everyone for the input. The lathe is finally up so that's one more step to having the shop going.
                  Did I miss the pictures??
                  Retired - Journeyman Refrigeration Pipefitter - Master Electrician

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by wmgeorge View Post

                    Did I miss the pictures??
                    It's a 16x60 with backsplash and a 3-jaw chuck but little else.

                    I figured this should cover most basic lathe duties with the addition of a DRO, a second 4-jaw, a collet chuck and a bunch of other tooling.

                    I'm still searching for steady rests that fit it.
                    You may only view thumbnails in this gallery. This gallery has 1 photos.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Fear View Post
                      I figured this should cover most basic lathe duties with the addition of a DRO, a second 4-jaw, a collet chuck and a bunch of other tooling.

                      I'm still searching for steady rests that fit it.
                      I think that the 16x60 would be a nice size lathe to have.

                      I don’t know what your budget is like but personally, I would go with the DRO last if it’s kind of tight.

                      A DRO on the lathe is nice but I view it more of a luxury rather than a necessity on a lathe. For a vertical mill, I view it as a necessity to use the machine efficiently. It would be one of the first things I added if it didn’t have one. Other opinions may vary on this.

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Originally posted by Fear View Post

                        It's a 16x60 with backsplash and a 3-jaw chuck but little else.

                        I figured this should cover most basic lathe duties with the addition of a DRO, a second 4-jaw, a collet chuck and a bunch of other tooling.

                        I'm still searching for steady rests that fit it.
                        Looking sharp mate!
                        21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
                        1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Originally posted by The Metal Butcher View Post

                          Looking sharp mate!
                          I see what you did there...
                          There are no stupid questions. But there are lots of stupid answers. This is the internet.

                          Location: SF Bay Area

                          Comment

                          Working...
                          X