Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Moving an 8000 lb tractor

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    Originally posted by larry_g View Post
    When I bought a small 10k lb crawler I paid Sunbelt or United rentals to move it for me. They have the equipment to move equipment and will move this for you. As I remember it was ~$300 for a 50 mile move. A whole lot less worry than renting a trailer and towing it myself and assuming all liability.

    lg
    no neat sig line
    Backup plan is a local mover at 150$ an hour. The distance alone makes this pricey.

    Comment


    • #32
      Yeabut, the cost of delivery is part of the purchase.

      Comment


      • #33
        Originally posted by RB211 View Post

        Backup plan is a local mover at 150$ an hour. The distance alone makes this pricey.
        How many hours to get it to your destination,sometimes trucking is a good investment.I had a piece of farm equipment trucked 700 km for $4800 cdn.,I could have legally towed it with a truck being a farmer but at 26’ wide had no interest.

        Comment


        • #34
          Originally posted by SVS View Post
          Holding air is more important than tread on a backhoe. You aren’t going mudding with a
          2wd. anyhow.
          Holding air (or ballast?) is important. I ran a case backhoe back in the 70’s, a 580B IIRC, that had bald rear tires from running on pavement most of its life and it was sketchy when you had to take it in the dirt with some moisture in it. Back end slid around a lot and would have to use the hoe to get out of some areas due to lack of traction. Just saying…
          Sole proprietor of Acme Buggy Whips Ltd.
          Specialty products for beating dead horses.

          Comment


          • #35
            Originally posted by Beazld View Post

            Holding air (or ballast?) is important. I ran a case backhoe back in the 70’s, a 580B IIRC, that had bald rear tires from running on pavement most of its life and it was sketchy when you had to take it in the dirt with some moisture in it. Back end slid around a lot and would have to use the hoe to get out of some areas due to lack of traction. Just saying…
            Yep. Most holes you dig with a backhoe have be backfilled at some point, so you’re usually pushing a pile with the loader. Bald tires on a 2WD machine make that a bit more difficult, especially with a relatively light (8000 lb) machine.

            Comment


            • #36
              I’m not criticizing RB’s purchase, but it’s an OLD backhoe. Numerous things could break that are unavailable or uneconomical to repair. I’d want to get some hours on the machine and feel good about it’s prospects before buying new tires that will add near zero productivity in good conditions. Would they help in mud? Some, of course, but it isn’t gonna set the world on fire either way.

              That $4300 bargain could turn into a $10,000 paperweight in a heartbeat, but at least it would go to scrap yard with nice shoes.

              Comment


              • #37
                Originally posted by SVS View Post
                I’m not criticizing RB’s purchase, but it’s an OLD backhoe. Numerous things could break that are unavailable or uneconomical to repair. I’d want to get some hours on the machine and feel good about it’s prospects before buying new tires that will add near zero productivity in good conditions. Would they help in mud? Some, of course, but it isn’t gonna set the world on fire either way.

                That $4300 bargain could turn into a $10,000 paperweight in a heartbeat, but at least it would go to scrap yard with nice shoes.
                I have all the shop manuals, what I really like about this Case is that parts are plentiful. However, the guy backed out of the deal as I had parts on the way, My business partner is working on him reconsidering. What pisses me off is that we shook hands, exchanged a check. It looks like they both are coming to an agreement. Maybe I am old school, but when you shake hands that should be it!

                Comment


                • #38
                  Isn’t the exchange of the check, legal and binding??

                  Sid

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by sid pileski View Post
                    Isn’t the exchange of the check, legal and binding??

                    Sid
                    I was stupid and forgot bill of sale. This guy has worked for my business partner in the past, so some benefit of the doubt existed. Lesson learned.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by RB211 View Post

                      I was stupid and forgot bill of sale. This guy has worked for my business partner in the past, so some benefit of the doubt existed. Lesson learned.
                      Even with a bill of sale or a signed contract, you'd have to sue him to force him to go through with the sale. Hardly with the effort for a $4300 machine.

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Originally posted by tomato coupe View Post

                        Even with a bill of sale or a signed contract, you'd have to sue him to force him to go through with the sale. Hardly with the effort for a $4300 machine.
                        True.

                        But you can also enjoin him from any OTHER sale pending resolution. That's more trouble for the seller than for you, assuming he really wants to sell it. (needs the money, etc).

                        Likely not worth it overall, unless for some reason you want THAT tractor.
                        CNC machines only go through the motions.

                        Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
                        Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
                        Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
                        I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
                        Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Originally posted by RB211 View Post

                          I'm sure they are pricey, might put chains on them. Hopefully it's the less expensive size on the tractor. Came in two sizes, one is very common, the other is not. Just spent 580$ on new brake components for it.
                          Understand from reading down thread that the deal may be off. However, if you do wind up getting it, or another one with similar rear tire wear, chains would be a good, cost effective option. For winter use chains work better on smoother tires, as on new tires the chain falls in between the new tire's deeper lugs, allowing the tire to spin on ice. In the mud the chains on smooth tires will be self cleaning vs newer tires without chains where the lugs can get packed with mud, especially if it's spinning in heavy clay, leaving you with a smooth tire and a stuck tractor. Only drawback to chains is they're a pain in the summer on smooth pavement. They can do some serious damage to pavement on a hot day.

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            We are pretty much settled on getting a Case Construction King, if not this one, another.

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              My buddy recently got a Case backhoe.
                              Not sure the year, but an older one.
                              The block on the diesel engine had a
                              huge blowout just above the oil pan rail.
                              Larger than a Coke can. It was all welded
                              back together and the engine ran well.
                              He said he was not afraid of it, as the welds
                              were not cracked or leaking at all. An old
                              repair that stood the test of time is apparently
                              nothing to worry about. He is an old tractor
                              puller guy, and he says the alloy in the old
                              Case parts is really good. More like steel than
                              cast iron. Aside from blowing an old hose once
                              and a while, he uses the heck out of it.

                              -Doozer
                              DZER

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                Originally posted by RB211 View Post
                                We are pretty much settled on getting a Case Construction King, if not this one, another.
                                Good decision. They're the Chevy of the construction site. Not the prettiest, nor does it always have all the bells and whistles. However, there's tons of 'em out there. That shear popularity speaks volumes about them. Find the best one that you can afford, and don't forget to post some photos! Remember; pictures, or it didn't happen.😀

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X