Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Advice or Ideas for spanner on Rohm Chuck

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Advice or Ideas for spanner on Rohm Chuck

    After reading gld post on his Albrecht Drill Chuck and the problems with getting them loosened off (seems like all keyless brands have same issues).I got this Rohm for free from a friend and was wanting a way of loosening it before putting into service( not a fan of pipe wrench method)I’ve only used the fixed style spanners and was curious if the a pivoting style have any advantages. Click image for larger version

Name:	869C3473-133A-499D-BBBC-61B03663F667.jpg
Views:	289
Size:	3.34 MB
ID:	2010944

  • #2
    I've used a strap wrench when a keyless chuck tightened too much. Something like this but with nylon strap:

    https://www.harborfreight.com/rubber...-pc-69373.html

    Comment


    • #3
      Strap wrench is good. I might prefer a pin spanner otherwise if it was necessary. There might not be enough wall thickness there for something like wrench flats.

      Pivoting spanners are for using on multiple diameter sizes. Fixed are always better/more secure.

      Comment


      • #4
        I bought a Cutwel 13mm with an integral R8 shank and it came with a C spanner to tighten/loosen if needed. You would have to dismantle the Rohm before contemplating adding 3 blind holes to use with a C spanner. It happens to be the best drill chuck we have, 0.001" tir or better throughout its full range. The joint on your Rohm is probably at the shiny metal band near the halfway point on the body.

        Comment


        • #5
          One of the guys in work had a stillson wrench with brass or bronze jaws ( looked tig applied) very useful for collets, chucks and drawbars that had gotten stuck
          a project on my list though I do have a nylon jaw one for faucets.
          mark

          Comment


          • #6
            If the idea is to fit a pin spanner to the top ring with the hole then that's not going to work. That top ring does not move for tightening. Although using it with a pin spanner to counter the strap wrench used on the lower sleeve would be an option.

            Another option could be a friction spanner made from some plywood with a split and a bolt or something to tighten it around the sleeve. The wood is non-marring and easy to use for making something like this. Of course it would not be hard to make something similar out of 1/2" aluminum as a metal working alternate.

            I find that something solid like that instead of a strap wrench is handier to use in a hurry or on a fairly regular basis. Strap wrenches are great tools but they are a bit fumbly to use.
            Chilliwack BC, Canada

            Comment


            • #7


              BCRider is right on, especially when he says to use aluminum. I made one a couple of years ago for an Albrecht chuck. 1/2" aluminum with a hole to fit the sleeve and a slot going to an edge. My piece was rectangular for the leverage. Put the chuck in, put the slotted area in a good vice and tighten to get a ~360 degree hold. Grab the other part of the chick in a big pipe wrench lined with a piece of leather (like an old belt), and spin the two apart.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Tundra Twin Track View Post
                After reading gld post on his Albrecht Drill Chuck and the problems with getting them loosened off (seems like all keyless brands have same issues).I got this Rohm for free from a friend and was wanting a way of loosening it before putting into service( not a fan of pipe wrench method)I’ve only used the fixed no style spanners and was curious if the a pivoting style have any advantages. Click image for larger version

Name:	869C3473-133A-499D-BBBC-61B03663F667.jpg
Views:	289
Size:	3.34 MB
ID:	2010944
                My 13mm Rohm-like chucks came with holes for a pin vise for tightening/unloosening, but not a second set for disassembly. So far they have always worked smoothly.

                However, I also have a real Rohm 8mm chuck that sat for a couple of years and seized up. I soaked it in IPA & mineral spirits until it worked smoothly, then wrapped it in paper towels and spun it dry (thanks, Chris Wood!). Since then I have made a point of “exercising” all of my chucks periodically. Fortunately, I’ve not run into a chuck that was so jammed that soaking didn’t fix things.
                Avid Amateur Home Shop Machinist, Electronics Enthusiast, Chef, Indoorsman. Self-Proclaimed (Dabbler? Dilettante?) Renaissance (old) Man.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I have not in many years had a keyless chuck get stuck on a shank.
                  Rules to obey...
                  No hole saws.
                  No Silver&Deming bits.
                  Nothing with a hex shank.
                  Then you will have no issues.
                  Seriously.
                  Simple as that.
                  Anything else is abuse.
                  Yes abuse.
                  You are a hack.

                  --Doozer
                  DZER

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Doozer View Post
                    I have not in many years had a keyless chuck get stuck on a shank.
                    Rules to obey...
                    No hole saws.
                    No Silver&Deming bits.
                    Nothing with a hex shank.
                    Then you will have no issues.
                    Seriously.
                    Simple as that.
                    Anything else is abuse.
                    Yes abuse.
                    You are a hack.

                    --Doozer
                    Yah........... maybe...........

                    I've had a plain ordinary drill tighten the damn chuck to seem more like a welded connection. I forget what brand the chuck was, but it was a a decent one. Chuck went straight into the box of "to be got rid of" stuff. I don't recall if I did get rid of it or not, I don't look in that box much. If I didn't, maybe it should go to scrap instead. I just took 800 lb to the scrapyard, and I hope a similar amount tomorrow. So when I get home I'll be in the mood to scrap useless stuff.

                    Those chucks just do that. They have to or they would not even work. Have seen no magic yet that avoids it. If there is some, I might dig that POS out and see if the incantation works.
                    CNC machines only go through the motions

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Doozer View Post
                      I have not in many years had a keyless chuck get stuck on a shank.
                      Rules to obey...
                      No hole saws.
                      No Silver&Deming bits.
                      Nothing with a hex shank.
                      Then you will have no issues.
                      Seriously.
                      Simple as that.
                      Anything else is abuse.
                      Yes abuse.
                      You are a hack.

                      --Doozer
                      I think this is good advice: while I don't use hole saws in the lathe or mill (have been thinking about getting a special R8 arbor and some of the smaller annular cutters), but I have occasionally used Silver & Deming bits - always use the cheap keyed chuck that came with the machine for these as precision isn't an issue.
                      Avid Amateur Home Shop Machinist, Electronics Enthusiast, Chef, Indoorsman. Self-Proclaimed (Dabbler? Dilettante?) Renaissance (old) Man.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Thanks guys for the ideas,may make a aluminum band clamp that was mentioned.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Shop rag and water pump pliers....... done.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I did make a mistake a while back and used a hole saw to cut into cast iron with the hole saw in one of my keyless chucks. Won't make that one again. I got it apart but it took a mighty grunt with a pipe wrench and thick belt like leather to grab the collar well enough.

                            I've done quite a few S&D drills. But I don't have any extreme sizes. The biggest is a 3/4" which has never resulted in needing additional leverage to loosen.
                            Chilliwack BC, Canada

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Tundra Twin Track View Post
                              Thanks guys for the ideas,may make a aluminum band clamp that was mentioned.
                              Honestly? A wood gripper would be fine. And hopefully you don't need it all that often. The only reason to make one from aluminium would be if you just don't have any woodworking gear at all. But even then wood can be "machined" on our metal gear.

                              My recent mistake with the hole saw into cast iron is the first time in years that I needed an aid to loosen any of my three Albrecht style chucks. Even hole saws in wood and really big Forstner bits in hard wood only require a slight extra jerk by hand to come free. Just don't do hole saws or major size difference S&D drills in metal with a keyless and life should proceed as normal.
                              Chilliwack BC, Canada

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X