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Case 430 brake job

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  • Case 430 brake job

    Never seen brakes like these, but I like them. The brakes are geared to spin 50 times faster than the wheels. A band brakes actuates from the pedals and slows down the outer drum. The drum is two piece held together with two springs. Between the pieces are large ball bearings sitting in ramps. So when the outer drum slows down from the band, the drum expands width wise and rubs against two wear plates. It's a band and reverse disk brake at the same time.
    Click image for larger version

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  • #2
    I’ve heard them called “self energizing brakes”.

    In tractor mechanic circles thy are called “finicky PITA’s” but the idea IS elegant.

    IH used a similar idea in that era, probably others as well.
    Last edited by SVS; 08-02-2022, 12:18 AM.

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    • #3
      Brakes on tractors are more of a suggestion really....
      I just need one more tool,just one!

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      • #4
        Originally posted by wierdscience View Post
        Brakes on tractors are more of a suggestion really....
        Not if properly maintained--80 per cent of the problems with farm equipment are owner created...
        Keith
        __________________________
        Just one project too many--that's what finally got him...

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        • #5
          Originally posted by LKeithR View Post

          Not if properly maintained--80 per cent of the problems with farm equipment are owner created...
          Yeah, lemme just pull these final drives off all the time...
          21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
          1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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          • #6
            Originally posted by The Metal Butcher View Post

            Yeah, lemme just pull these final drives off all the time...
            On IHC tractors they are under a side cover.
            Not bad really.

            -D
            DZER

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            • #7
              I just sent my John Deere tractor in for its yearly service and TUV. The idiots sent it back 12 liters low in the hydraulic fluid. Gotta love these service guys.
              Location: The Black Forest in Germany

              How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Doozer View Post

                On IHC tractors they are under a side cover.
                Not bad really.

                -D
                Not easy on Fergusons from my understanding.
                21" Royersford Excelsior CamelBack Drillpress Restoration
                1943 Sidney 16x54 Lathe Restoration

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                • #9
                  Replaced both fuel filters and hydraulic filter, engine filter and oil was changed. Should probably drain the coolant and put fresh in it. Still working on the brakes, as in waiting for parts to come. Have to make or fix the throttle rod. This sucks not having my machine shop here

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by RB211 View Post
                    Never seen brakes like these, but I like them. The brakes are geared to spin 50 times faster than the wheels.
                    Typical for slow moving machinery like your tractor, the transmission spins and deals with high engine speeds and gear reductions just like any common automotive application. When you do this and power a large drive wheel, like in your backhoe, (agricultural drive tires can be HUGE) there needs to be a hefty gear reduction ratio in the mix. This is normally accomplished with what's referred to as a "planetary final drive" at the rear axle. If we recall from our high school physics class; speed and torque expressed as a ratio are inversely proportional. What this means is that when properly adjusted that little bitty brake assembly spinning at the much faster speed before the planetary gear reduction will have enough braking power to lock up that rear tire if need be.

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                    • #11
                      Here's an update, just waiting to replace the oil seal on the bull pinion. Mostly new brake parts. Old oil seal looks bad, using caveman tools to remove old seal.
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                      • #12
                        That’s not caveman tools I’ve done the same numerous times and it usually works good,did you use claw hammer to pull it out🤓

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                        • #13
                          yup, just replaced rear main crank seal on a small block chevy. used a sheet metal screw and nail puller.
                          OH!, and then you need pressing tooling to seat the new seal.
                          4" PVC plastic pipe plug

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                          • #14
                            My Case 580C needs a brake job. But first I have to get it running again. Took the fuel pump off for a rebuild last November... Still haven't put it back together

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                            • #15
                              The screws rip out, the nail I bent 90 degrees and tried heat treating failed. Of course nails are cheap pot metal. Trying to avoid losing 2 hours of my day driving to Ellsworth, I went to Hamilton Marine and picked up a "packing removal tool. Let's see how this works...
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