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Vib finishing,anyone else here do it?

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  • Vib finishing,anyone else here do it?

    A big part of my reel building requires vibratory finishing machines, synthetic cones and then treated cob. I find these machines fascinating and could watch them all day lol. I built the machine with the treated cob and saved thousands doing so. Currently working on a few reels....

    Rounding off corners, dimensional polishing surfaces


    Last edited by RSG; 08-06-2022, 06:09 PM.
    Ontario, Canada

  • #2
    Originally posted by RSG View Post
    A big part of my reel building requires vibratory finishing machines, synthetic cones and then treated cob. I find these machines fascinating and could watch them all day lol. I built the machine with the treated cob and saved thousands doing so. Currently working on a few reels....
    Those are nice machines. I do the synthetic tetrahedron with dish soap and walnut shells with liquid wax . I use two large brass cartridge tumblers, works well. JR

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    • #3
      I use ceramic pyramids in a cement mixer with poly tub and paddles. That was about 1/10th the cost of the vibratory tumbler that I really wanted. The cement mixer gets the job done, but takes about 3 times as long.
      Kansas City area

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      • #4
        Originally posted by JRouche View Post

        I do the synthetic tetrahedron with dish soap
        And what do you primarily finish, steel or aluminium components? I only use mine for aluminium parts and a big finishing company near me recommended using synthetic cones way back so that's all I've ever used but from what I've read Tetrahedron media can get into tight spots and puts a very fine finish on the parts suitable for anodising as well.

        How do you like them and how long does a cycle take to cut the edge and smooth the face?

        Ontario, Canada

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Toolguy View Post
          I use ceramic pyramids in a cement mixer with poly tub and paddles.
          Gets the job done no doubt but I assume with those paddles and the fall of the media the parts have a high impingement rate. I assume you only use it for steel parts?

          Ontario, Canada

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          • #6
            I do steel or aluminum (not together) as needed. It 's more of a rolling motion, so they don't bang together much. There's a good amount of water to smooth out the action, and Dawn and water keeps the media from loading up with metal particles.
            Kansas City area

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            • #7
              Originally posted by RSG View Post

              And what do you primarily finish, steel or aluminium components? I only use mine for aluminium parts and a big finishing company near me recommended using synthetic cones way back so that's all I've ever used but from what I've read Tetrahedron media can get into tight spots and puts a very fine finish on the parts suitable for anodising as well.

              How do you like them and how long does a cycle take to cut the edge and smooth the face?
              Aluminum. And yes, the corners do get into tight spots. Ill run a cycle of the hard media for 12hrs and then follow up with the walnut if its a steel part for 24-48hrs. I dont run aluminum through the walnut shell. JR

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Toolguy View Post
                It 's more of a rolling motion, so they don't bang together much.
                Ah so the same sort of principals as a high energy centrifugal barrel finisher only slower. Speaking of which I almost built one had I had enough room to store it.
                Ontario, Canada

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by JRouche View Post

                  Ill run a cycle of the hard media for 12hrs
                  Wow 12 hours? My parts would be ruined if I let my machine run that long. What size is your finisher?
                  Ontario, Canada

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                  • #10
                    Never used vibratory finishing. I do tumble parts sometimes, with varying types of media.

                    What would you say is the biggest difference, aside from the potential of impact damage from tumbling?

                    I have wanted the parts deburred or sharp edges removed, and have found that tumbling really does not do that very well. Does vibratory finishing do a better job of deburring and blunting sharp edges?
                    CNC machines only go through the motions.

                    Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
                    Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
                    Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
                    I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
                    Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                      What would you say is the biggest difference, aside from the potential of impact damage from tumbling?

                      Does vibratory finishing do a better job of deburring and blunting sharp edges?
                      When you say "tumble" I assume you are referring to those small barrel shaped units that sit on a roller cage? If so then the difference is the amplitude is higher on a tub style machine like mine which in turn is much more aggressive in action. Burrs are removed much faster and the edges are rounded over in about an hour on aluminium leaving the part soft to the touch while maintaining it's geometric integrity.
                      Ontario, Canada

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                      • #12
                        Yes, the vibratory finishing does a better (faster) job than tumbling. The media is sitting there rapidly rubbing back and forth over everything. The more media (weight) you have in the container, the better it works. You can only fill up a given size of bin to a certain level for optimal media action, so to have more weight, you would have to upsize to a larger unit.

                        The rotary tumbler does a passable job, but you have to run the parts longer. Most of the vibratory finishing I've had done didn't leave the parts in as long as I wanted them to. I get the results I want in the cement mixer. The run time really doesn't matter, because you can be doing something else the whole time.
                        Kansas City area

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by RSG View Post

                          Wow 12 hours? My parts would be ruined if I let my machine run that long. What size is your finisher?
                          Hahaa. Yeah, your delicate parts would be eaten up. For those parts you make a run of 30-90 minutes would knock down any sharp sections in my vibrator. Its about 18" in dia 12" tall. I slow the speed of it way down and most of my stuff is bulky. I might have been thinking about steel too. Steel I will let vibrate for more than 12hrs. JR

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                          • #14
                            Thanks. It does take a very long time in the tumbler, and 12 hours is not unknown at all.
                            CNC machines only go through the motions.

                            Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
                            Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
                            Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
                            I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
                            Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by JRouche View Post
                              Steel I will let vibrate for more than 12hrs. JR
                              Good to know! I plan to do some stainless watch cases I'm making in mine soon and have no clue really how long to run other than a visual.
                              Ontario, Canada

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