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New blade break-in on a 4 x 6 bandsaw

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  • New blade break-in on a 4 x 6 bandsaw

    Rather than insert a new sub-topic in the other active 4 x 6 thread I'll start a new one.

    I just got some new Lennox Diemaster-2 blades, and read the back of the pizza box they came in. Seems they think that breaking in a blade is important. As I understand it, you want to give the blade a chance to slightly round over the razor sharp new teeth before making aggressive cuts. They direct you to their website for details. https://www.sawcalc.com/break-in-instructions. There are three problems. Parameters for import 4 x 6's aren't shown, you can't set such parameters on these simple, inexpensive saws anyway, and you can't even get parameters for 1/2" blades. So what to do? Simply control the feed by hand for the first minute or so, so as to allow the blade to cut very gently without taking a real bite and possibly fracture brand new dead sharp teeth?
    Last edited by Randy; 08-11-2022, 03:34 PM.

  • #2
    I seem to recall reading somewhere that it's a good idea to start the blade on brass or aluminum for a short while.
    I've never pursued any break-in regimen myself ...probably why I've never enjoyed particularly good longevity from a blade.
    Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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    • #3
      All I've ever done to break in a blade is make the first couple of cuts on something solid like 1-1/2"
      or 1" square and take it easy on the feed. This allows the blade to be supported in the cut so the
      teeth aren't entering the material too aggressively. Just don't make your first cuts on thin angle or flat
      bar stood on edge where the blade has no support at all.

      We bought an Ellis 1600 years ago and this is how the dealer said we should break in blades. We've
      done it the same way ever since and have always had generally good blade life...
      Keith
      __________________________
      Just one project too many--that's what finally got him...

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      • #4
        Start with aluminum, but at a slower feed/speed than you would expect to normally use. Probably won't hurt to cut like that for 20 minutes or more before considering the blade to be "broken in". Brass is soft, but ideally wants a completely different tooth than steel or aluminum. Not sure how this might effect break in.
        "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

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        • #5
          With the 4x6 a lighter cut means dialing up the support spring a little more. Other than that I agree with the idea of using it on a couple of pieces of solid bar stock for the first couple of cuts.

          We don't want to go TOO light though. The tips need to be removing stock or they'll rub and wear sooner. It's very much one of those "Goldilocks" happy middle values. With bigger section solid stock I'd say that the regular pressure is fine since it's distributed across such a wide number of teeth.

          For any cuts that are going through thinner walls be it tubing or thin angle stock I tend to stand there and take off some of the load or for very thin items hand control the feed fully. It's far kinder on the blades doing that. I do that for the whole life of the blade. Besides, the items that need that extra care tend to cut rapidly anyway. So it's not a lot of time.
          Chilliwack BC, Canada

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          • #6
            I just hold the saw up and feed gently for a minute or two

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            • #7
              Originally posted by LKeithR View Post
              All I've ever done to break in a blade is make the first couple of cuts on something solid like 1-1/2"
              or 1" square and take it easy on the feed. This allows the blade to be supported in the cut so the
              teeth aren't entering the material too aggressively. Just don't make your first cuts on thin angle or flat
              bar stood on edge where the blade has no support at all.

              We bought an Ellis 1600 years ago
              That is an old bandsaw

              Comment


              • #8
                Here's a link to the break in procedure outlined by Ellis saw. I use their blades and follow their break in recommendations. A blade usually lasts 2 to 3 years with daily use.

                Band Saw Blades - Ellis Mfg, Inc. (ellissaw.com)

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by LKeithR View Post
                  All I've ever done to break in a blade is make the first couple of cuts on something solid like 1-1/2"
                  or 1" square and take it easy on the feed. This allows the blade to be supported in the cut so the
                  teeth aren't entering the material too aggressively. Just don't make your first cuts on thin angle or flat
                  bar stood on edge where the blade has no support at all.

                  We bought an Ellis 1600 years ago and this is how the dealer said we should break in blades. We've
                  done it the same way ever since and have always had generally good blade life...
                  Doall Rep gave very similar advice.

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                  • #10
                    You're basically just trying to wear off, or knock off, the burr that remains from grinding the teeth. I would just use steel, and do two things- go really easy when first dropping the blade into the steel so it loses any tendency to wander, and secondly keep the pressure lower for the first couple minutes of cutting. Also, try to keep several teeth in the cut- in other words don't cut thin material where there might only be two or three teeth in the cut in any moment.

                    Not sure what I think about starting with aluminum- if there's any tendency for it to stick in the gullets of the teeth, it might not be wise to start with it. If you're not afraid of having some wood dust on the machine, you might cross cut some maple or other hardwood to start with. At least with wood there's some give and ability to absorb segments of burrs that might otherwise pinch in the cut. When you cross cut, the end grains do a pretty good job of 'wiping away' anything stuck to the teeth.
                    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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                    • #11
                      Break in a new band saw blade. That's the first time I've heard that.

                      I wonder if that helps with those cheap, import blades.

                      .........

                      Just kidding. They're just junk.
                      Paul A.
                      SE Texas

                      And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                      You will find that it has discrete steps.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
                        Break in a new band saw blade. That's the first time I've heard that.

                        I wonder if that helps with those cheap, import blades.

                        .........

                        Just kidding. They're just junk.
                        A Doall Rep explained it like this,take a wood pencil sharpen it to a pin point touch the paper and the fine point breaks off.Same goes for new blade with razor sharp edge on teeth.He recommended round mild steel with half speed & feed of usually for a couple cuts to dull it so to speak.

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                        • #13
                          When I was running a CNC Marvel 81APC saw the Lennox rep told me 1/2 speed and 1/2 feed until about 6 sq inches of material had been cut. Two cuts through a 2"rd bar would usually suffice. On my 4X6 I tighten the spring up to lighten the blade pressure as much as a I can and find a chunk of scrap to make a couple of cuts through for break in.

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                          • #14
                            I've never followed any break in procedures and I get all of 5 years out of a blade, and that's cutting everything including a lot of SS.

                            I've also noted that different blade mfg's. have their own break in procedures and some differ quite a bit.

                            JL.............

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                            • #15
                              The Doall Rep I mentioned earlier was selling a lot of blades to a large manufacturing company cutting bundles of thin wall square tubing.After showing them the correct break in procedure they were getting 5 times the life out of a blades.The owner thanks the guy for being a excellent rep but mentioned he was a pi$$ poor salesman as blade sales dropped accordingly.

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