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Corollaries to Murphy's Law

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  • Corollaries to Murphy's Law

    While adding a water filter to my Heat Pump's Humidifier I developed several additions to Murphy's Law (https://www.thoughtco.com/murphys-la...truths-2832861), related to the handling of small parts:

    1) If (when?) a part is dropped, it will bounce/roll further than seems physically possible.

    2) If dropped inside, the part will travel until it is under an immovable object; if outside, the part will end up in a deep, narrow hole or in tall grass.

    3) The part will be precisely 1/2" ± 1/8" further away than can be reached, regardless of the tools at hand.
    Avid Amateur Home Shop Machinist, Electronics Enthusiast, Chef, Indoorsman. Self-Proclaimed (Dabbler? Dilettante?) Renaissance (old) Man.

  • #2
    Chaz; I have encountered a few other discrepancy's with the the Laws of Nature

    4) if a part is dropped directly above a foot or shoe, it grows in Mass and Density

    5) if a part is dropped and hits another object before the floor, it violates the physics law of equal reaction by doubling in deflection energy and distance
    Last edited by Rich Carlstedt; 08-13-2022, 01:46 PM.
    Green Bay, WI

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    • #3
      A bench grinder equipped with a wire wheel to buff/clean objects is a device that randomly grabs said objects and transports them to a different dimension in time and space rarely to be seen again.

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      • #4
        I have a Black Hole under my bench that will suck any difficult to replace part into another dimension
        Helder Ferreira
        Setubal, Portugal

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        • #5
          O'Toole's corollary: Murphy was an optimist.
          At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

          Location: SF East Bay.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Noitoen View Post
            I have a Black Hole under my bench that will suck any difficult to replace part into another dimension
            Noitoen, I solved the problem with the Black Hole under my main work bench a few years ago:

            Before (note that I need access to the foot switch for my Foredom Flex-Shaft):
            Click image for larger version  Name:	Before - No Toekick.jpg Views:	0 Size:	110.0 KB ID:	2012604
            Typical Craftsman sheet metal workbench, with shelves (behind the door on the left) and multiple drawers; I placed the legs on "excess" melamine-coated particle board to spread the load and make it easier to move the bench (before I made it immobile by filling the shelves & drawers).

            After:
            Click image for larger version  Name:	After - Removable Toekick.jpg Views:	0 Size:	114.7 KB ID:	2012605

            Details:
            Click image for larger version  Name:	Anatomy of the Toekick.jpg Views:	0 Size:	89.9 KB ID:	2012606
            The main board is pre-primed MDF, cut to a little wider that the gap between the legs. To this is attached a piece of PVC lattice that is a close fit between the Melamine "pads" and touches the concrete floor. If you look closely:
            Click image for larger version  Name:	CloseUp of the Toekick (1).jpg Views:	0 Size:	53.5 KB ID:	2012609
            under the white vinyl tape there is a recessed Neodymium magnet, one of a pair that holds the toe kick in place until access to the foot switch is needed. The tape makes it easier to remove any steel chips that would otherwise fill in the recess the first chance they got (another corollary?).

            However, I'm not going to address the numerous other Blackholes in the shop, I get little enough accomplished as it is.

            [Edit: added an oval around the tape-covered magnet so you will have a fighting chance of finding it]
            Last edited by ChazC; 08-13-2022, 08:01 PM.
            Avid Amateur Home Shop Machinist, Electronics Enthusiast, Chef, Indoorsman. Self-Proclaimed (Dabbler? Dilettante?) Renaissance (old) Man.

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            • #7
              Another similar "Law of Nature":

              http://bullfire.net/Articles/LAWS%20Short.pdf

              Ed
              For just a little more, you can do it yourself!

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              • #8
                I do not like anything in my shop that things can roll under. PERIOD! When I design a work bench, it sits on a COMPLETELY sealed base. No holes what-so-ever.

                Of course others do not follow that rule so I have a number of benches and tool boxes that do have space under them. C’est la vie!

                This was the inspiration for this tool, which has helped me more times than I can count:

                Click image for larger version  Name:	Photo05R800x600.jpg Views:	0 Size:	218.2 KB ID:	2012636 Click image for larger version  Name:	Photo07R800x600.jpg Views:	0 Size:	218.2 KB ID:	2012637 Click image for larger version  Name:	Photo06R800x600.jpg Views:	0 Size:	168.4 KB ID:	2012639
                A big feature is the light can be adjusted to strike the floor at a low angle, producing a long shadow. That helps the part, which stands above the surface, to be distinguished from the pattern in the floor, WHICH IS A DELIBERATE WAY OF HIDING THINGS ON IT. "My floor is dirty? Na! I don't see no stinking dirt. Just ignore the clouds of dust when you walk on it."

                In case you have never tired, I can assure you that it is extremely difficult to buy flooring in a solid color with no pattern. You have to paint the floor to get that feature which would be an immense help in finding dropped parts.
                Attached Files
                Last edited by Paul Alciatore; 08-14-2022, 01:13 AM.
                Paul A.
                SE Texas

                And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                You will find that it has discrete steps.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by ChazC View Post

                  1) If (when?) a part is dropped, it will bounce/roll further than seems physically possible.

                  2) If dropped inside, the part will travel until it is under an immovable object; if outside, the part will end up in a deep, narrow hole or in tall grass.

                  3) The part will be precisely 1/2" ± 1/8" further away than can be reached, regardless of the tools at hand.


                  1. Your fault. You bought good tools. Crap tools don't bounce.

                  2. I dont want to go there...

                  3. I got old and got some extendo-claw type grabbers. Human sized, not the lil micro units I have seen.

                  JR

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                  • #10
                    You will drop the carburetor screw in the gravel at 1AM, and so you will also disassemble the engine, thinking that it rolled down one of the cylinders instead. And then re-assemble everything because you have to go to work in the morning. Ask me how I know....
                    25 miles north of Buffalo NY, USA

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by nickel-city-fab View Post
                      You will drop the carburetor screw in the gravel at 1AM, and so you will also disassemble the engine, thinking that it rolled down one of the cylinders instead. And then re-assemble everything because you have to go to work in the morning. Ask me how I know....
                      What is stupid is I have been down that road. JR

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                      • #12
                        If a spring is involved, there is a pretty good chance that either it or the piece it goes with will make a successful launch into orbit to places Nasa or SpaceX can only dream of going.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Paul Alciatore View Post
                          I do not like anything in my shop that things can roll under. PERIOD! When I design a work bench, it sits on a COMPLETELY sealed base. No holes what-so-ever.

                          Of course others do not follow that rule so I have a number of benches and tool boxes that do have space under them. C’est la vie!

                          This was the inspiration for this tool, which has helped me more times than I can count:

                          Nifty arrangement, Paul; Frank Hoose made a similar item, including a camera, but didn't include a way to retrieve the "mis-placed" object:

                          https://youtu.be/yoNghhXw7eI

                          Devices such as these get more appealing as I age, and although after dropping 1/3 of my weight it is easier getting down (and more importantly, back up) the concrete floor is still hard on my knees so I have several sets of knee cushions strategically located throughout the house:

                          Click image for larger version

Name:	Kneeling Pads.jpg
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ID:	2012696
                          Avid Amateur Home Shop Machinist, Electronics Enthusiast, Chef, Indoorsman. Self-Proclaimed (Dabbler? Dilettante?) Renaissance (old) Man.

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                          • #14
                            Has anyone other than yours truly, used a vacuum cleaner with long extension tubes to retrieve a small aluminum part by opening up the vacuum to fish the part out? Yep, that may be my one claim to fame.

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                            • #15
                              Having arthritis, I have telescopic magnets at the museum and at home, at least good for 50% of dropped items.

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