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Why do people not use anti-seize?

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  • Why do people not use anti-seize?

    Is it like vegetables? Good for you, so they don't want to use it? I'm greasing or putting anti seize on everything on the tractor so 20 years down the road I don't have to wage a battle on it. Seriously, why do people not use it?

  • #2
    Because we know every damn time we use it we are going to get it all over ourselves! Its the devils silver goo!

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    • #3
      I use anti-seize for extreme conditions, usually high heat, like exhausts and spark plugs. I think an ample coating of motor oil or grease is sufficient for everything else metallic, except high-pressure oxygen fittings.
      Last edited by fiddle fixer; 08-16-2022, 07:59 PM.

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      • #4
        Most people don't think 20 years in advance. When I work on machinery, I do think of the difficulty of the work and how to mitigate the bother for somebody else in the future. Things like taper pins can be fitted so that the small end is not only visible, but identifiable too. Parts that do not require a tight fit can be eased and lubricated so they can be dismantled in a fraction of the original time. Oil, grease or assembly compounds keep the joints and fasteners from corroding.

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        • #5
          I use it for nearly everything. I'm likely the guy that'll have to remove it later anyway. I also use it on gaskets.
          I do, however, miss the old lead-based stuff. It worked better than any other and wasn't so darn hard to clean up.
          Southwest Utah

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          • #6
            Does not take 20 years down the road can just take 1 or two out in the elements to warrant using it, wheel lugs are a good example being in constant water and salt and corrosion,
            another honorable mention is spark plug threads - some of today's double iridium plugs can go up to 100,000 miles, and most people think "great" yeah till you go to remove them and pull part of the cylinder heads aluminum threads with it...

            anti seize takes up the space that carbon normally would - carbon fills all the little area's between the threads and the plug, but with anti-seize the grease will leave but the solid lubricants will not - better to have that in there then the carbon,,,

            Of course you have guys like Andy (VTP) afraid of the silver color and afraid of washing his hands or something...

            I been using anti-seize for over 45 years, it's a must have and a must do on certain parts....

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            • #7
              I use it all the time. I must have 10 cans floating around in different places between the shed, the basement and the garage.

              But we are all shop guys. Asking why "people" don't use it is another matter entirely. Most average folks don't use it because they don't have any technical knowledge. Basically, they don't know any better.

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              • #8
                ...same reason I don't use toothpaste on everything.

                Anti- seize is good for what it does, and I use it on things where
                -they get stuck if I don't
                -they won't come off if I use it
                -the fastener goes into aluminum.

                It's messy, but also, it derates both the attaching torque and the resistance of a
                fastener to backing out. So for wheels that rust onto hubs, I use it all the time.
                For driveline bolts that are torqued to 80% of plastic, AND have a history
                of backing out, I never would. Because it'd both mess with the assembly
                torque AND increase the chance that they'd loosen.

                For tractor bits that sit outside? All the time.

                t
                rusting in Seattle

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
                  Does not take 20 years down the road can just take 1 or two out in the elements to warrant using it, wheel lugs are a good example being in constant water and salt and corrosion,
                  ...........................................
                  Originally posted by Tobias-B View Post
                  .................................................. ..........
                  Anti- seize is good for what it does, and I use it on things where
                  -they get stuck if I don't
                  -they won't come off if I use it
                  -the fastener goes into aluminum.

                  It's messy, but also, it derates both the attaching torque and the resistance of a
                  fastener to backing out. So for wheels that rust onto hubs, I use it all the time.
                  .....................................

                  t
                  Gosh I mentioned it for wheel lugs a year or two back. What did I get? A long list of people telling me how bad and downright dangerous it is to do that......... "it's gonna kill you!"...... "the wheels are gonna fall off when the lugbolts break off because you used your full weight on the wrench and then jumped on it".......
                  Last edited by J Tiers; 08-16-2022, 01:03 PM.
                  CNC machines only go through the motions.

                  Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
                  Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
                  Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
                  I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
                  Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Tobias-B View Post
                    ...same reason I don't use toothpaste on everything.

                    Anti- seize is good for what it does, and I use it on things where
                    -they get stuck if I don't
                    -they won't come off if I use it
                    -the fastener goes into aluminum.

                    It's messy, but also, it derates both the attaching torque and the resistance of a
                    fastener to backing out. So for wheels that rust onto hubs, I use it all the time.
                    For driveline bolts that are torqued to 80% of plastic, AND have a history
                    of backing out, I never would. Because it'd both mess with the assembly
                    torque AND increase the chance that they'd loosen.

                    For tractor bits that sit outside? All the time.

                    t
                    Yes you have to use common sense - it's not to be put on everything and not to be slathered on some of the stuff you do put it on,

                    and things like wheel lugs take common sense also ---- it can derate the proper torque application for them too, but so can dry chirping on the verge of galling or galling lugs and iv seen plenty of them also...

                    Used correctly it's great stuff and in fact I cannot imagine being a mechanic and never using it on anything - to me that's irresponsible ignorance...

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by J Tiers View Post



                      Gosh I mentioned it for wheel lugs a year or two back. What did I get? A long list of people telling me how bad and downright dangerous it is to do that......... "it's gonna kill you!"...... "the wheels are gonna fall off when the lugbolts break off because you used your full weight on the wrench and then jumped on it".......
                      I find a long list of people live in California where things don't rust at all.

                      t
                      rusting in Seattle

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by RB211 View Post
                        Is it like vegetables? Good for you, so they don't want to use it? I'm greasing or putting anti seize on everything on the tractor so 20 years down the road I don't have to wage a battle on it. Seriously, why do people not use it?
                        I use it for many items, not everything though. And when I do forget it on a needed item it costs me money.

                        Example. I was making up some links for the rear suspension of my car. The threaded inserts for the bar were mild steel and the rod ends were stainless steel. I was just mocking it up. So I threaded the rod end on and measured then was going to disassemble for welding. It was stuck, I tried everything except for heat. The 5/8" rod end was a loss. As was the weldable insert. I never forgot again.. JR

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                        • #13
                          Rust is just one reason to use it to guard against --- just plain dry where im at is another,,, also SS fasteners don't stand a chance without it, a plethora of reasons why it will always be on my shelf ready to go...

                          My compound bow has adjustability between 30 - 70 lbs pull and my main adjusters go into the aluminum frame of the bow, those I do have slathered as the very long bolts are also my built in bow press that allows me to disassemble the bow to work on and iv had it down many times... just grease would suffice but anti-seize attracts less dirt and does the job better...

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                          • #14
                            Well, it rains around here a LOT. And when I lived in Ontario for a few years they used beaucoup amounts of salt on the roads. So I've learned to use grease or NS on just about anything vehicle related that I worked on to save myself from future annoyance. This translated over to the bicycles that were used for year round commuting for both corrosion reasons PLUS many bicycle fasteners are threaded directly into aluminum parts. So grease or NS was almost a must to avoid galling and thread damage.

                            It's like the Frank's hot sauce commercial.... I use that *[email protected]& on EVERYTHING!

                            I've had some folks ask me if I'm not concerned about the screws backing off due to the oil, grease or NS. I can get the same tension on the fasteners with less torque and suffer from less thread wear and I've never had any of them lose any of their initial torque load.
                            Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                            • #15
                              You guys talk about 'de-rating' the torque as though it was de-rating the 'tight'. The torque is lowered because you get the same tension on the fastener with less resistance. I have personally never had a properly torqued fastener, anti-seize or not, loosen by itself. Yes, I use it on lug-nuts and they're still hard to remove, just not impossible on the side of the road with OEM tools.
                              Southwest Utah

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