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Identify this tool please

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  • #46
    Here is the difference between my blocks and the blocks in the video...His blocks have one groove in each block that line up....mine don't. My blocks have two grooves in each block.
    Like I said I think each of my blocks go to another set... I know you guys are tired of this post so lets drop it...At least I found out what they are supposed to be for, mine are just not a matched set for that purpose......Thanks again everybody...I always wanted to be a machinist but I ended up being a Pennsylvania State Trooper for 30 yrs..now retired, but machinist was my second choice.
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    • #47
      Originally posted by longrifle007 View Post
      lynnl, Look at my second pic in my 34 post...Blow it up, as you can see the V's would line up correctly however the handle can't get threaded thru the unthreaded hole and go into the threaded hole...because it will go into the other unthreaded hole.....I never use the word obtuse....I only ever saw that word used in the movie The Shawshank Redemption...LOL
      Did you go back and look at Joel's Schaublin post?
      (edited: Something weird is happening with the editor here! that should read "Joel's (pound-sign) 24 post." It happened to me earlier, and I see the same thing in bcrider's post 43 above.) Somehow typing pound-sign with a number copies in some unrelated link. ...???)

      From that 2nd (#34 picture):
      a. flip one of them end for end (thru a vertical plane, not horizontally)

      b. Make each threaded hole align with a clearance (non-threaded) hole.

      c. ignore those V notches on the narrow edges. They're not relevant here. (one will be on top, one on bottom) They may've been intended to use as small V-blocks ...who knows?

      d. Then stick a threaded end of each handle thru the clearance holes and then thread it into the threaded holes (see item b. above).
      Last edited by lynnl; 09-14-2022, 02:01 PM.
      Lynn (Huntsville, AL)

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      • #48
        Originally posted by longrifle007 View Post
        Here is the difference between my blocks and the blocks in the video...His blocks have one groove in each block that line up....mine don't. My blocks have two grooves in each block.
        Like I said I think each of my blocks go to another set... I know you guys are tired of this post so lets drop it...At least I found out what they are supposed to be for, mine are just not a matched set for that purpose......Thanks again everybody...I always wanted to be a machinist but I ended up being a Pennsylvania State Trooper for 30 yrs..now retired, but machinist was my second choice.
        Ok, so the guy fixed the screwup in order that the part that he already spent time on, could be used. And, yes, it still works, but it obviously was messed up when made. There is a groove that works, and there is a groove that cannot work.

        CNC machines only go through the motions.

        Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
        Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
        Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
        I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
        Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

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        • #49
          Yes, completely ignore the V groove on the side without any holes ('side' being 90° to the face with the holes).
          This groove was a mistake - the student/apprentice screwed up and went on to add the V groove in the correct orientation so the tool was at least usable after all that work. This is just as Doc stated way back in post number 5, he didn't know you had more parts, so his last 2 sentences can now be ignored.
          Tap wrenches like this are an extremely common student project. They are very simple to make yet require several operations on a lathe and mill, and yield a functional and useful tool.
          Location: North Central Texas

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          • #50
            Look, just forget about the v groove in the narrow edge of the block. It serves no apparent useful purpose and was probably a screw up on the part of the original maker. Go back to the photo in your post 44. The blocks are correctly aligned, all you need to do is to slide the threaded ends of the handles through the plain holes and screw into the threads of the other block. Then you've got a useable, if not very pretty, tap wrench. Just forget about the v grooves in the narrow edges of the blocks.
            'It may not always be the best policy to do what is best technically, but those responsible for policy can never form a right judgement without knowledge of what is right technically' - 'Dutch' Kindelberger

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            • #51
              Just when I thought I was out, they bring me back in...LOL...Anyway if you look at this pic you will see that it can hold a tap, however it is not the same orientation as Doozers pic in post 33, and that is what I was trying to tell you guys...It is IMPOSSIBLE to line these blocks the way Doozers pic is lined up, it just can't happen. I'm never gonna use them as such anyway, I just wanted to know what they were.....This has been a VERY interesting post to say the least and I thank you guys.
              Attached Files

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              • #52
                It looks to me that whoever made it filed one of the vees in the wrong plane by mistake, and didn't bother to make another block. Imagine what he would have thought if he had known that the picture was going worldwide one day.

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                • #53
                  Yaaa! <Confetti Emoji>

                  Hey, at least we are all in agreement that this was pretty painful.
                  Location: North Central Texas

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                  • #54
                    Yes it was painful, especially for you guys.....I'll be following you guys in this forum, now that I found it...as I said in my post 46, this has always been my second love...L8R BTW, I like being called a Junior Member....ha ha ha, I'm 78
                    Last edited by longrifle007; 09-14-2022, 05:44 PM.

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                    • #55
                      Now, if someone could just help me identify this tool:

                      Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20220914_153724341.jpg
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Size:	1.36 MB
ID:	2017148

                      (Ducking to avoid impalement by various hurled shop items.)
                      Location: North Central Texas

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                      • #56
                        Oh no, here we go again....lol....Anyway Joel, I think you better make a new post of your own with that question cause I think mine is done and nobody will be looking at mine anymore...Good luck, I will follow your post cause I sure as heck don't know what it is....Pete

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                        • #57
                          Originally posted by longrifle007 View Post
                          Just when I thought I was out, they bring me back in...LOL...Anyway if you look at this pic you will see that it can hold a tap, however it is not the same orientation as Doozers pic in post 33, and that is what I was trying to tell you guys...It is IMPOSSIBLE to line these blocks the way Doozers pic is lined up, it just can't happen. I'm never gonna use them as such anyway, I just wanted to know what they were.....This has been a VERY interesting post to say the least and I thank you guys.
                          longrifle007:

                          If you have assembled your parts in Post 51 as they are labeled below (and it appears that you have), then you have assembled them exactly as Doozer did in Post 33,

                          As several have pointed out, it appears that your parts have an extra, useless, V-notch that may have been a mistake by whoever made this assembly.

                          Click image for larger version

Name:	Tool 11.jpg
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ID:	2017156


                          Best quote of the thread... "It looks to me that whoever made it filed one of the vees in the wrong plane by mistake, and didn't bother to make another block. Imagine what he would have thought if he had known that the picture was going worldwide one day." - old mart
                          SE MI, USA

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                          • #58
                            Dr. Mike,
                            I never said it would not hold a tap...I was just saying I couldn't assemble the two parts and have it look like Doozers pic in post 33...In other words in his pic both blocks are flat across the top...
                            Yes that is an extra groove...Now do you understand. End of story....Thank you

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                            • #59
                              The difference between your tap wrench and the one Doozer showed is that yours appears to have been made by an idiot, and his doesn't. Yes we know that is an extra groove, for goodness sake we spent long enough telling you it was. Apart from that one groove, eventually you listened to what we all said and have now assembled it properly so that it looks like Doozers.
                              'It may not always be the best policy to do what is best technically, but those responsible for policy can never form a right judgement without knowledge of what is right technically' - 'Dutch' Kindelberger

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                              • #60
                                It's interesting to note that the blocks, including the notches, appear to have been planed, not milled. Whoever made that, used a shaper.

                                Which means it's probably a lot older than we think. Would they have still been having apprentices learn to use shapers, even into the early sixties? They were generally already considered obsolete twenty years before that. (Though yes, I know they were still in common use for years afterward, and can still be found in use today.)

                                Doc.
                                Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

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