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Identify this tool please

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  • plunger
    replied
    Originally posted by Noitoen View Post

    Nope. I'm Portuguese. Went to South Africa when I was 10 years old, after the revolution in Mozambique in1974. Since we lost everything then, in 1981 my parents sold the house and shop, put everything transportable into a 60 cubic metre container and came back to Portugal. We also wanted to avoid me going to the Angola border. I was turning 17 that year.
    We must be about the same age then. I went to the border in 82 /83 .It was either that or three years jail and being shunned by your community. It must have been tough losing everything . I think you are in a better position now in Portugal. As much as I love this beautiful country things are falling apart real fast. We experience two sessions of two hour blackouts during the day every day these days and the corruption and violent crime is getting out of hand .I have always wanted to see the big waves of Nazare.Its on my bucket list.

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  • Noitoen
    replied
    Originally posted by plunger View Post

    Are you South African?
    Nope. I'm Portuguese. Went to South Africa when I was 10 years old, after the revolution in Mozambique in1974. Since we lost everything then, in 1981 my parents sold the house and shop, put everything transportable into a 60 cubic metre container and came back to Portugal. We also wanted to avoid me going to the Angola border. I was turning 17 that year.

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  • plunger
    replied
    Originally posted by Noitoen View Post

    I learned ho to use a shaper at John Orr Technical High, in Johannesburg back in 1980
    Are you South African? In 1980 I was sight seeing on the Angolan /South west Africa border during our border war against the Cubans ..Then I did my apprenticeship with Hart ltd. Funny how I hated using the shaper then but now that I don't have one I wish I did. But mainly for dove tails. I have a big wish list .

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  • Noitoen
    replied
    Originally posted by plunger View Post

    Thats true. I was taught to use a shaper in 1988 but when we progressed to the toolroom there wasnt even a shaper there. Only in the apprentice room.
    I learned ho to use a shaper at John Orr Technical High, in Johannesburg back in 1980

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  • CarlByrns
    replied
    Originally posted by old mart View Post
    One of those custom made things, the use of which probably died with the original maker. Keep it just in case it can be useful for metal stock and repurpose it.
    It looks like you have got the pictures going ok, so have another go with your other thread photos.
    It looks a lot like a 'factory' transmission tool, something to hold the reverse gear idler shaft next to the secondary shaft.

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  • plunger
    replied
    Originally posted by Richard P Wilson View Post

    Yes, apprentices were still taught how to use shapers at least up to the 1980s. Whether they ever used one again ouside the apprentice training school is another issue.
    Thats true. I was taught to use a shaper in 1988 but when we progressed to the toolroom there wasnt even a shaper there. Only in the apprentice room.

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  • Richard P Wilson
    replied
    Originally posted by Doc Nickel View Post
    It's interesting to note that the blocks, including the notches, appear to have been planed, not milled. Whoever made that, used a shaper.

    Which means it's probably a lot older than we think. Would they have still been having apprentices learn to use shapers, even into the early sixties? They were generally already considered obsolete twenty years before that. (Though yes, I know they were still in common use for years afterward, and can still be found in use today.)

    Doc.
    Yes, apprentices were still taught how to use shapers at least up to the 1980s. Whether they ever used one again ouside the apprentice training school is another issue.

    Leave a comment:


  • DrMike
    replied
    Originally posted by Peter. View Post
    We all made what would seem like 'idiot' mistakes back when we knew little or nothing.
    For me, "back when" has been all day today.
    To limit the damage I should just stop what I'm doing, go back to bed and start over.

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  • Peter.
    replied
    I think that's a student- or novice-made part that just went wrong as others have said. I bet the vees were filed in the wrong faces by mistake then corrected. That the short vees are on opposite sides when it's assembled is of no consequence, although it might hold taps better if the sides were filed down flat.

    We all made what would seem like 'idiot' mistakes back when we knew little or nothing.
    Last edited by Peter.; 09-16-2022, 02:38 AM.

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  • Doc Nickel
    replied
    It's interesting to note that the blocks, including the notches, appear to have been planed, not milled. Whoever made that, used a shaper.

    Which means it's probably a lot older than we think. Would they have still been having apprentices learn to use shapers, even into the early sixties? They were generally already considered obsolete twenty years before that. (Though yes, I know they were still in common use for years afterward, and can still be found in use today.)

    Doc.

    Leave a comment:


  • Richard P Wilson
    replied
    The difference between your tap wrench and the one Doozer showed is that yours appears to have been made by an idiot, and his doesn't. Yes we know that is an extra groove, for goodness sake we spent long enough telling you it was. Apart from that one groove, eventually you listened to what we all said and have now assembled it properly so that it looks like Doozers.

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  • longrifle007
    replied
    Dr. Mike,
    I never said it would not hold a tap...I was just saying I couldn't assemble the two parts and have it look like Doozers pic in post 33...In other words in his pic both blocks are flat across the top...
    Yes that is an extra groove...Now do you understand. End of story....Thank you

    Leave a comment:


  • DrMike
    replied
    Originally posted by longrifle007 View Post
    Just when I thought I was out, they bring me back in...LOL...Anyway if you look at this pic you will see that it can hold a tap, however it is not the same orientation as Doozers pic in post 33, and that is what I was trying to tell you guys...It is IMPOSSIBLE to line these blocks the way Doozers pic is lined up, it just can't happen. I'm never gonna use them as such anyway, I just wanted to know what they were.....This has been a VERY interesting post to say the least and I thank you guys.
    longrifle007:

    If you have assembled your parts in Post 51 as they are labeled below (and it appears that you have), then you have assembled them exactly as Doozer did in Post 33,

    As several have pointed out, it appears that your parts have an extra, useless, V-notch that may have been a mistake by whoever made this assembly.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	Tool 11.jpg
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ID:	2017156


    Best quote of the thread... "It looks to me that whoever made it filed one of the vees in the wrong plane by mistake, and didn't bother to make another block. Imagine what he would have thought if he had known that the picture was going worldwide one day." - old mart

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  • longrifle007
    replied
    Oh no, here we go again....lol....Anyway Joel, I think you better make a new post of your own with that question cause I think mine is done and nobody will be looking at mine anymore...Good luck, I will follow your post cause I sure as heck don't know what it is....Pete

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  • Joel
    replied
    Now, if someone could just help me identify this tool:

    Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20220914_153724341.jpg
Views:	179
Size:	1.36 MB
ID:	2017148

    (Ducking to avoid impalement by various hurled shop items.)

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