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  • air compressor.. home built

    my bandsaw project is coming to an end.. soooo i need a nuther project.. thinking of building a pump, from scratch, a v twin, 4 inch bore 3 inch stroke. hydraulic tube for cylinder bores, 8 inch tube 1 inch wall for crankcase.. .id make the crank like a harley, three peice .. what u think? mabee use chevy pistons. yes i know i can buy one but whats the fun of that? a bit of feed back would be ok... lol might be kind of fun..
    freddy
    Last edited by freddycougar; 07-06-2006, 01:11 AM.
    15X50 colchester.. 9 inch southbend. milrite, wire feed

  • #2
    Oh golly, so many things to make and so little time. That would certainly be an interesting project, all right. But a compressor seems like an awful lot of trouble relative to what they cost. There must surely be another tool that has a better price/performance ratio?

    Best,

    BW
    ---------------------------------------------------

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    • #3
      well bob i want air soon.. dont need anything else...dont seem that difficult i have more than a file... lol
      fredy
      15X50 colchester.. 9 inch southbend. milrite, wire feed

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      • #4
        Freddy,

        Hmmm...could be an interesting project...

        Since you're determined to make one, what about getting sleeves for the cylinders. A good choice would be to use the piston, sleeve, etc made for a Perkins Diesel.
        Last edited by Mike Burdick; 07-06-2006, 02:22 AM.

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        • #5
          I had a strong urge to pick up an automotive air conditioner compressor from the scrapyard the other day. I wonder what it would be like to convert for shop air? Looks to me like they turn at engine speed- could work to go direct drive (through a coupling ) from a 3450 rpm motor. Might need a good 2 or 3 horse motor to run it, I don't know. There could be some issues with the clutch, but it shouldn't be too hard to arrange a positive drive without needing to power the clutch.

          Maybe there would be an issue with lubrication, like with some home fridge compressors. Maybe not.

          It's a thought anyway.
          I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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          • #6
            Why not start with a lawn mower engine. Most of the necessary stuff is right there. A new head with reed valves...

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            • #7
              Get an old straight six. Remove the exhaust valve pushrods and cam followers for the back three cylinders. Block off the intakes to those cylinders and port them to fresh air. Install one way valves in place of the spark plugs and plumb to a common manifold and air receiver. It will now fire 1, 3, 2 and pump air on 5, 6 and 4 (order 153624) Hook the unused spark plug cables to the unused spark plugs and ground the plugs as usual someplace so they still spark. This stops the voltage rising too high.

              Vrooom. Sandblaster!
              Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

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              • #8
                Just to throw out some more ideas:

                A compressor can be made out of an engine by replacing the valve train with disk valves and a few other mods.

                Could even convert half of the cylinders and power it with the other half - not an uncommon setup.

                BC
                BC

                If ya wannit done your way ya gotta do it yourself.

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                • #9
                  Air Con Compressors make very good air compressors. You can usually get 12-14 CFM from one. Lubrication is an issue, as they use the refrigerant as a lubricant, but I have seen setups that just use an in line drip oiler (like you would use on an air tool) in the inlet, and then a big coalescing filter on the output. I have also seen setups where the compressor has been packed with grease, but I would be less confident of that!

                  This is the setup I am plannig to use on my Land Rover for on-board Air, but I see no reason it couldn't be used with a decent electric motor.

                  Mark

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                  • #10
                    "Why not start with a lawn mower engine. Most of the necessary stuff is right there. A new head with reed valves..."

                    You mean like this?


                    Which I made from a discarded almost-brand-new mower with a bent crank from hitting a stump. It's got a new head with an O-ring check valve for the outlet. The original intake valve remains with a very light spring on it for the inlet. The exhaust valve is held down by the new head, and the valve lifters were removed. It's powered by a 1/3HP washing machine motor.
                    It's good for about 50psi, but the flow's pretty low.

                    It's been running since 1968 with no problems, and it still has the original oil in the crankcase. I did clean the air filter a few times though.

                    Roger
                    Any products mentioned in my posts have been endorsed by their manufacturer.

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                    • #11
                      There are many compressors made from IC engines. There was at least one that was self powered. It resembled a tractor and had a large air tank mounted on the front. It may have been a Schramm, I don't recall for sure. They did make a combo compressor.

                      One of my next projects is to build a hit & miss engine out of an air compressor. It works both ways. All you need is to make a suitable head and add or remove the valve train depending on which way you are going.
                      Jim H.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by darryl
                        I had a strong urge to pick up an automotive air conditioner compressor from the scrapyard the other day. I wonder what it would be like to convert for shop air? Looks to me like they turn at engine speed- could work to go direct drive (through a coupling ) from a 3450 rpm motor. Might need a good 2 or 3 horse motor to run it, I don't know. There could be some issues with the clutch, but it shouldn't be too hard to arrange a positive drive without needing to power the clutch.

                        Maybe there would be an issue with lubrication, like with some home fridge compressors. Maybe not.

                        It's a thought anyway.
                        Mine works okay. Takes a little while to fill the 60gallon tank. Just a york AC compressor. Pretty common on volvo's and older fords.

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                        • #13
                          Thats the kind my older brother built for filling up tires and stuff, we used it for at least a decade and had no lube issues, it didnt have a tank, it just had a motor, compressor, hose and adj. pressure relief.

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                          • #14
                            I cant remember for the life of me but somebody makes a pretty strange automotive compressor or at least did, it had like 6? tiny little cylinders all in a circle, (not radial but circular), the crank was some kind of an offset lazy susan thing, very strange, but i bet it was smooth,,, you could over bore three and connect them to the remaining standard three and have a pretty extravagant high rpm two stage...

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                            • #15
                              The York automotive compressors hold their oil in the crankcase. On some instalations they had shutoffs on the inlet and outlet so the oil level could be checked.

                              The round compressors - radial and axial - rely on oil circulating with the refrigerant.


                              BC
                              BC

                              If ya wannit done your way ya gotta do it yourself.

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